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March 23, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-23

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THE WEATHER I7T- ur~ASSOCATED.I
WARTI ERD FAIR;DAY 'AND NIGHT WIRE
VOL. XXIX. No. 122. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

_ -

MONROEDOCTRINE
PROTECTION FINAL
CON FER EN C ESTEP
JAPANESE AMENDMENT ASKS FOR
JUST RACIAL TREAT-
MENT
SETTLEMENT OF FIUME
QUESTION IS PROBLEM
Italy to Fight for "Indispensable''
Completton of the Mother
Country
Paris, March 22. - Amendments
safeguarding the Monroe doctrine and
a Japanese amendment for just racial
treatment were among the last number
oC proposals before the peace confer-
ence commission on the league of na-
tions which met at American head-
quarters Saturday afternoon under the
chairmanship of President Wilson.
These and other propositions up to
this time have been in a controversal
state and the commission met today
to decide if they will be included in
the covenant. Numerically the neu-
trals have proposed the largest num-
beg of proposals. They are largely
formal except the Swiss amendment
concerning sovereignty.
fl use's Plan Ready Soon
There is no hint yet as to the char-
fcter of the plan under consideration
by Colonel E. M. House, for settle-
went of the Fiume problem. It is ex-
pected that the plan will be ready
soon, -
The Italian delegation has answered
all advances made aiming at the es-
tablishment of the eastern frontier
without assigning Flume to Italy by
declaring that any such solution, even
if eaccepted by the delegates here,
would be useless as neither the Italian
parliament nor people would ratify.
such an agreement for the abandon-
ment of what they consider the "in-
dispensible completion of the mother
country."
Determine Economic Subjects
The economic subjects to be intro=
duced intoi the preliminary treaty have
been definitely determined by the eco-
nomic commission. These take a wide
range, ,the important subjects includ-1
ing the disposition of German patents,
trade marks, copyrights, and alien
property. The main subjects which
will appear in the treaty are:
First, the status of German com-
(Continued on Page Six)
How Ye Cash Can
Burn Ye Pocket
What would you do with $120,000?
That is the amount of money which
will pour gloriously into Ann Arbor
before the end of the month as a re-
sult of the- $60 bonus donated by Un-
cle Sam.
A lot of good could be done with
that much cash, but "easy come, easy
go," so the chances are that the great-
er portion of this bonus will go for
the little things, will fritter away ex-
actly as a five dollar bill melts after
it is cracked.
Inquiries as to just what the $120,-
000 would buy if lumped in varied
purchases resulted in the following
suggestions:
Pay for 342,857 hair cuts or 600,000'
shaves.
Mean 7,200,000 dances in a hal

where the admission is 50 cents. The
distance covered in this number of
dances totals to 5,400,000,000 feet or
40.88 times around the world. If the
dancer started from New York. and
traveled in a straigth line, he would
run out of tickets in London.
Buy 1&,000,000 camels, which placed
end to end would distance about 521
miles or the distance from Chicago
to Buffalo. The death of a cigarette
involves five minutes. The aforesaid
12,000,000 would fume for 115 years.
Purchase 51,111 gallons of ice
cream, which amount is sufficient for
1,635,552 C. 0. D3. sundaes.
At 15 cents per pound buy 1,699,-
200,000 navy beans.
Enable the owners to play billiards
or pool for 10,000 days and nights or
27.4 years.
Take in 600,000 picture shows, thus
causing 900,000 hours of eye strain.
Pay the car fare for 40,000 round
trips to Detroit or 20,000 round trips
+o Tnlp.n

Council Decries-. w
.,1iob .Rule Hazing
Hazing was the important subject
for discussion at the last meeting of
the Student council.
It was the opinion of those present,
not as councilmen, but as student up-
perclassmen, that the average fresh-
man needs some hazing, but that there
is a point where a definite line must
be drawn. Mob hazing, which inva-
riably results in destruction to prop-
ert andbodily injuries, is not to be
countenanced.
'The outcome of the formation of a
Mob is harmful to the reputation ofr
the University," said alph E. Gault,
'19, president of the council.f
The council is ready to take dras-
tic action should any such demon-
strations occur.t
NEWI COMMUNITY HOUSE
THROWN OPEN STURUAY
REUNION OF ITALIAN POPULA.-
TION PLANNED FOR
THIS WEEK
r E
With 4ew furniture and fresh paint,
the Community house opened its doors
to the public yesterday afternoon for
the first time.
Work will begin immediately at the
house, the purpose of which is to dis-
pense any possible service to the gen-
eral public.
Italian Reunion This Week
Those in charge are planning a re-
union this week for the Italian popu-
lation of the city. One of the inten-
tions of this institution is to promote
a good feeling among the foreigners
and the city.
The Community house is being man-
aged by the Community Service Fed-
eration and the city council. A bud-
get of $2,400 has been appropriated for
one year's expenses, $600 of which was
contributed by the city.
City Societies Furnished Rooms
The rooms on the third floor are al-3
ready applied for by girls who wish
to make their permanent residence
there. The rooms were furnished by
different organizations of the city,
which were the King's Daughters of
the city churches, Pythian Sisters, Ann
Arbor Woman's Federation, Lois Re-
beccah Lodge, Federation of Labor,
Homeopathic hospital and the Grange.
Mrs. Minnie McClelland will be the
house matron and will make her per-
manent home at the Community
house. The board of directors of the
community federation are Mrs. Ella
Heartt, Mrs. B. Dewey, Mrs. Aus-
tin Scott, Mrs. R. A. Field, and Miss
Josephine Randall.1
RABBI HERSHMAN TO DELIVER
MENORAH SOCIETY LECTUREI
"Zionism-A Liberation Movement"
will be the subject of an address by i
Rabbi A. M. Hershman, of Detroit,
who will usher in at 8 o'clock this
evening in Lane hall the first of the
lecture series arranged by the Michi-
gan Menorah society.
Great enthusiasm over the subject1
has been shown at recent meetings
of the society, and a general discus-
sion both pro and con is expected to
be held after the talk. Rabbi Hersh-
man is president of the Detroit dis-
trict of Zionists and is a leadei' in theI
movement. He will speak in part on
the plans for a Jewish homeland in
Palestine.I

THREE PRIZES TO
WINNING ORATOR

To Receive Chicago Alumni Medal
Kaufman Testimonial of
Hundred Dollars

and

WILL REPRESENT U. OF M. IN
ORATORICAL LEAGUE CONTEST
Besides being selected as Michigan's
representative in the Northern Ora-
torical league contest May 2, the win-
ner of the 29th annual University or-
atorical conest which will be held at
8 o'clock Monday evening in Univer-
sity hall, will receive the Chicago
alumni medal as well as the Kaufman
testimonial of $100.
Medal Is World Famed
The Chicago alumni medal whch is
presented annually to the person win-
ning first honors in University ora-
tory, is of bronze. It was designed
by Mr. Sullivan, architect of the Chi-
cago Auditorium, and is considered by
critics to be the finest of its kind. At
an expense of $1,350 the medal was
engraved by the engraver of the Unit-
ed States mint. Replicas of the medal
are in the art museums of London,
Paris, Petrograd, and Berlin.
Only Contest This Year
The oratorical conest Monday eve-
ning is the only event of that nature
in the college year, since all other
campus public speaking activities
(Continued on Page Six)
HOP TICKETS WITH TAX
PAID SENT YESTERDAY
BOOTH DRAWING COMPLETED BY
SATISFACTORY
METHODS
SEND IN HOP LISTS!
Lists of all girls to be in the
booths of fraternities and in-
dependents at the J-Hop, with
the cities from which they come,
must be in by Monday night.
These lists will appear in the-
J-Hop Extra. They should be
addressed to Hugh W. Hitchcock
at the Daily office, Press build-
ing.
Tickets for the J-Hop have all been
distributed with the exceptions of
those for which the war tax has not
yet been received. It will be neces-
sary for all who have paid for their
tickets to send in the money for the
war tax at once if they desire to at-
tend the Hop. If this money is not
reecived by the committee by Monday
the $5 already received will be return-
ed to the applicant.
Booth Drawing Completed
Drawing of the booths was com-
pleted Saturday and the system used
in this was found to be satisfactory.
Few Dorm Reservations Made
More ticket holders will have to
make known their intention of taking
advantage of the offer made by the
directors of Newberry dormitory or
the proposition will have to be taken
back altogether. The latest that it
will be possible to apply for a room
there will be Monday.

Newspaper en
TofrMeet Tuesday
Students of jounalism in the Uni-
versity, correspondents of outside
newspapers, members of the staffs of
the different campus publications and
others interested in newspaper work
are to get together next Tuesday night
to talk over different phases of the
profession. *
Prof. J. R. Brumm and Prof. F. N.
Scott, of the rhetoric department, and
Mr. Lee A. White, formerly an in-
structor of journalism in the Univer-
sity and now on the editorial board
of the Detroit News, are on the pro-
gram for talks.
The get-together, which is to be in
the form of a smoker, will begin at
7:30 o'clock, and will be held at the
Union.
The smoker is to be given under the
auspices of Sigma Delta Chi, pro-
fessional journalistic fraternity.
URGE COLLEGE USE S
AERO TR91NING CAMPS
M1ILITARY OFFICIALS PLAN NEW
FIELD FOR WORK OF
R .OT. C.
New York, March 22. - With a view
to preparing men for future military
or commercial aerial activities, the di-
vision of military aeronautics has pre-
pared a program for college students
which will not interfere with their
prescribed courses, and which will fit
[teem in three years' time for any kind
of aviation.
According to Col. B. E. Castle for-
nmerly of the military aeronautics con-
trol board, aviators will become su-
perannuated more quickly than any
other kind of officer, consequently it is
imperative that the supply of trained
personnel be kept up.
The machinery of the Reserve Of-
ficers' Training Corps has been chos-
en as most likely to bring about the
desired results. The equivalent of
ground school work exclusive of mil-
*itary practice will be given at the col-
leges during the college year, and fly-
ing and military training in six week
summer camps held at northern flying
fields.
JMixer Perp lexes
Formality Hater
Shades of army chow lines and bar-
gain day rushes-did you go to the
All-Campus mixer? They were all
there, seniors and freshmen, those who
danced and those who didn't, those
who couldn't, but intended to, all in
line awaiting the reception commit-
tee ordeal. Some tried to evade it
and effect a side door entrance to the
floor but here the hand of the lawe, in
the form of a janitor in uniform,
stepped in and they were forced to
take their place at the end of the line.
Of course introductions were neces-
sary, in formality it was rivaled only
by the Fresh mixer..
The limited attendance of 500 was
soon reached and many were turned
away. The proceeds of the mixer willJ
go toward the production of the play
"Quality Street," to be presented by
the Masques May 8 and 9.

BISHOP CHARLES Di WILLIAMS,
PREACHER OF LENTEN SERMON
AT ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH THIS
MORNING.
VARSITY BAND M AKEIS
NEW WESTERN CONQUEST~
CAPTAIN WILSON PLEASED WITH
CONDUCT OF ORGANIZATION
ON TRIP
Due to the excellent showing made
by the Varsity band at the Victory
loan meeting Friday, in Chicago, an
engagement with the Camp Grant or-
ganization for the evening banquet of
the loan workers was cancelled in fav-
or of the Michigan band.
Every member of the Michigan mus-
ical organization was highly compli-
mented, both in press reports and in-
dividual comments, following both the
appearances before the convention in
Chicago. The chairman of the vari-
ous state commissions publicly ex-
pressed their thanks for the service
done by the band.
Registrar Arthur G. Hall stated that
in every particular the band had main-
tained Michigan standards. More than
1,000 Michigan delegates backed the
band, supporting its music by Michi-
gan yells and other "pep" measures
introduced for the occasion.
Capt. W. Wilson, speaking of. the
conduct of the personnel of the band,
during its stay in Chicago, pronounc-
ed himself as highly pleased. lie re-
marked further that instead of mere-
ly being an organization for the pro-
motion of "pep" at games and other
intercollegiate contests, the band is
now an organization capable of pro-
ducing a high standard of music.
PROFESSOR WATERMAN TO BE
ORIENTAL SOCIETY PRESIDENT
Prof. Leroy Waterman, of the semet-
ics department, was elected president
of the middle west branch of the
American Oriental society at a meet-
ing held recently at the University of
Illinois. The association is made up
of university teachers of Oriental lan-
gues in the middle west.

MICHIGAN WINS MEET BY 2 POINTS;
JOHNSON TIES WORLD'S RECORD IN
DASH; MAONTKESECOND PLACE

WOLVERINES SECURE HONRS BY
RELAY TEAM FORGING
IN SECOND PLACE
MAIZE AND BLUE SHOT
PUTTERS GRAB 8 POINTS
Farrell's Well-Balanced Track Squad
Score Points in All of Ten
Events
(Special to The Michigan Daily)
Chicago, March 22 (via the Associ-
ated Press) .-Scoring in every one
of the 10 events, the well-balanced
team of the University of Michigan
won the Western Conference indoor
track field meet with a total of 36 1-2
points. Chicago was second with
34 1-2, and Illinoi& third with 18.
The remaining points were split up
as follows: Northwestern, 13; Pur-
due, 4 1-2; Minnesota, 2; Iowa, 1 1-2,
and Wisconsin, 1.
Wolverines Battle Maroons
The victory was a repetition of the
Wolverine triumph in the Big Ten a
year ago. The meet was a hard bat-
tle between Michigan and Chicago,
traditionally athletic rivals of the
west.
The teams alternated in taking the
lead, and before the relay, the last
event, Michigan led by four points.
Chicago won the relay, but Michigan
finished second, which gave the cham-
pionship to the Michigan athletes.
Johnson Hero of Meet
Carl Johnson, of Spokane, the 20-
year-old ace of the Michigan squad,
was the star of the meet, scoring 15 of
his team's points. In the 50-yard dash
he tied to world's record.
The meet developed several spirited
races, but the thriller was the two-
mile event in which Harry MCosh,
captain of the Chicago team, defeat-
ed Sedgwick for Michigan in a re-
markable finish at the tape. McCosh
nosed out the Wolverine by a ,scant
two inches, after Sedgwick had led
all the way for the last mile.
Summaries of Meet
Western Conference indoor meet won
by Michigan; Chicago, second; Illnois,
third; Northwestern, fourth; Purdue,
fifth; Minnesota, sixth; Iowa, seventh;
Wisconsin, eighth.
50-yard dash-Won by Johnson,
Michigan; Carroll, Illinois, second;
Cook, Michigan, third; Mills, Illinois,
fourth. Time, :05 2-5. (tied world's
record). 60-yard high hurdles-Won
by Johnson, Michigan; Hamilton,
Northwestern, second; Jensen, Min-
nesota, third; Zmmerman, Illinois,
fourth. Time, :08. High jump-Won
by Johnson, Michigan, Linn, North-
western, second; Weghorst, Purdue,
and Brigham, third, Iowa, 5 feet 9
inches, third. Height, 5 feet 11 inches.
440-yard dash-Won by Kennedy,
Chicago; Emery, Illinois, second; But-
ler, Michigan, third; Webr, North-
western, fourth. Time, :53 4-5. 880-
yard dash-Won by Speer, Chicago;
Lewis, Chicago, second; Gardiner, Il-
linois, third; Burkholddr, Michigan,
fourth. Time, 2:04. Mile run-Won by
McCosh, Chicago; Lewis, Chicago, see-
ond; Saskey, Illinois, third; Bouma,
Michigan, fourth. Time, 4:40.
Two mile run-Won by MCosh,
Chicago; Sedgwick, Michigan, sec-
ond; Moore, Chicago, third; Burr,
Wisconsin, fourth. Time, 9:48. Pole
vault-Won by Eielson, Northwestern;*
Burcheit, Illinois, second; Westbrook
and Cross, Michigan, third, 11 feet 6
inches. Height, 12 feet 4 inches. Shot
put-Won by Smith, Michigan; Bum-
morish, Purdue, second; Walls, Mich-
.igan, and Gorgas, Chicago, third. Dis-
tance, 41 feet 2 3-4 inches. Relay-
Won by Chicago (Kennedy, Harris,
Hall and Speer); Michigan, second; Il-
linois, third; Northwestern, fourth.

Time, 3:35 2-5.
CITY DEVELOPMENT PLANS
EXPECTED IN SHORT TIME
Plans for the development of the
city on which the Olmsted City
Planning company has been working
are expected here in a short time.
The plans were ordered by the
University Board of Regents and the
Civic association before . this coun-
try entered the war, and their com-
pletion was suspended when the
company was obliged to devote its
entire activity to war work.

..

First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
10:o, Address by Leonard A. Barrett
Theme, "Applied Patriotism"
Noon, Prof T. E. Rankin speaks to Students
6:30, Young People's Evening Serbiee

WESLEYAN *GUILD LECTURE
James Austin Richards
Pastor of the Congregational Church, Winnetka, Illinois
"The Religion of a Conqueror"
TONIGHT METHODIST CHURCH ONHT

a r

29th

ANNUAL

ORA TORICAL

Under the

A uspices

of The

Oratorical

Assoc

CONTEST
┬░iation
8 P. H.
Admission free

MONDAY EVENING, MA RCH 24,

Everybody Cordially

Inbited

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