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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 22, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
COLDIEJ'

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ASSOC:I ATE D
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VOL. XXIX. No. 121.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 1919.

PRICE THREE CENT

I

-SEIFRHIDGE FIELD
AND CUSTER MADE
PERMANENT POSTS
WAR DEPARTMENT HAS READY
$10,000,000 TO PURCIIASE
ARMY SITES
27 CAMPS WITH 15
'DROMES ABANDONED
Whole Future of Cantoniments De-
pends Upon Nation's Military
policy

Smoker Planned
-By Journalists
Sigma Delta Chi, professional jour-
nalistic fraternity, will hold a smoker
Tuesday evening at the Union. The
smoker will be open to the public,
and anyone interested in journalism is
inivited.
Talks will be given by Lee A. White,
of the Detroit News, Prof. F. N. Scott,
of the rhetoric department, and oth-
ers. Mr. White will speak on "Moderi
Journalism."
Pi Delta Epsilon, honorary frater-
nity in journalism, has been invited
to attend in a body and it is expected
that everyone else interested in any
way in journalism will be present.

WANT COMPULSORY
LIT ASSEMBLIES

Hazing Imperils University 's
Welfare, Says President Hutchins

Class

Unity and Spirit Would
Gained; Engineers Seto
Example

Be

C
71
fJ
I
k
J

STUDENT LEADERS AS UNIT,
IN FAVOR OF PROPOSED PLAN

"Appropriations of over a million
and a half dollars, now before the
legislature at Lansing, are seriously
threatened," stated President Harry
B. Hutchins Friday night, "because of
the recent hazing, and the disgrace-
ful conduct of certain students.
"Hazing has always beensdiscour-
aged by the University," said the
President, "but coming at this time
may be suicidal to the plans now
formulating for new buildings and
better salaries. It is inconceivable to
me how, any student who has the in-
terests of Michigan at heart can 'act

in such a tuanner at this time."
The President deplored the atti-
tude taken by Detroit papers on re-
cent events at Michigan, and said that
it was this kind of publicity that gave
the legislature the wrong impressions
of the University, and caused appro-
priations to be cut.
"Thepresent appropriations now
before the houses at Lansing are
probably the most important in the
history of Michigan. Any actions of
the students thaf the public may crit-
icise are liable to imperil appropria-
tions," the President concluded.

UNIVERSITY BAND
DRAWS ATTENTION
AT LOAN, MEETINE
LEADS MICHIGAN DELEGATION T4
HOTEL WITH PLAYING OF
"VICTORS"
"CREATES SENSATION"
SAYS DIRECTOR'S WIRI
Government Officials Spe at Con
ventlon; Prepare for
Loan
Playing the "Victors" as the
marched at the head of the Michiga:
delegation into the La Salle hotel, Chi
cago, where the Victory Liberty Loa:
committee was in session Friday, th
Varsity band drew enthusiastic at

(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 21.-Two army
camps in Michigan are among those to
be retained bythe government. Camp
Custer cantonment upon which the
government l4as expended approxi-
mately $13,000,000 is to be taken
over for $625,000. Selfridge flying
field at Mt. Clemens is to be pur-
chiased for $190,000.
Decision of the war department to
proceed with the purchase.of the sites
of 15 army camps and 13 balloon and
flying fields over the country was an-
nounced today by Acting Secretary
Crowell.
Ia,000,000 Involved
less tlan $15,000,000 will be ivoly-
ed, Mr. Crowell said and it will not be
necessary to await action by congress
as the department now has the nec-
essary funds. With these purchases
eomnplted the army will have 30 train-
ing. camps Including the original 16
cantonments constructed for the
training of the national army and 19
aviation centers most of which will
be in the southeastern states, Texas
and California. The few fields to be
-retained in the north will be regard-
ed as summer flying fields only.
Abandon Camps
Twenty-seven camps and 15 avia-
tion fields will be abandoned. Orders
have already gone out for the aban-
donment of 20 of the camps Including
nearly all of the national guard train-
ing centers put up after the United
States declared war on Germany.
Construction work on the 27 camps
according to war department figures
represents a cost of approximately
$110,000,000 of which $43,000,000 was
spent on four embarkation canton-
meuts.
Approximately $280,000,000 has been
spent in construction work on the 15
cantouments to be bought and the 15
now owned and it was largely because
of the sum Involved that the depart-
ment decided to go ahead with the
purchase.
Now Demobilization Centers
Most of the 30 camps now are be-
ing used as demobilization centers but
no definite plans for their employ-
ment after the war army is disbanded
has been evolved. It was explained
the the whole problem of the future
use of the camps depended on the na-
tion's military policy and no conclu-
sions as to that could be reached until
the peace conference at Paris had
rendered its decision as to the world
disarmament.
PRELIMINARY SUMMARIES
Chicago, March 21-(Special)-But-
ter and Burkholder of Michigan qual-
ified Friday in the preliminaries to the
western Conference track meet to be
held here Saturday night. Summar-
les: 440 yard dash, first trial,*Emary,
Illinois won; Kennedy, Chicago sec-
ond; time 54 1-5. Second trial, qrin-
ach, Northwestern, won; Butler,
Michigan, second; time 53 3-5. Third
trial, Weber, Northwestern, won; Hall,
Chicago second; time 54 2-5. Half
mile run, first trial, McCosh, Chicago,
won; Ramsey, Wisconsin, second;
Burkholder Michigan, third; time 2.08
1-5; second trial, Spencer, Chicago,
won; Lewis, Chicago, second; Gardi-
ner Illinois, third; time, 2.06 2-5.

COMMUNITY HOUSE OPENS
D TO PUBLIC TODY

RECEPTION TO BE HELD
RESIDENTS OF COUNTY
AND CITY

FOR

Ann Arbor's Community house will
open its doors and enter upon its ac-
tivities at 1 o'clock this Saturday aft-
ernoon with a reception for townsfolk
and residents of Washtenaw county.
Organizations Furnish Rooms
The house, located at tie corner of
Main and Williams street, will be
thrown open to the inspection of the
public. Its 16 rooms are being com-
pletely furnished by organizations of
the city and granges.
Will Aid Welfare Work
The Community house is the result
of the joint efforts of the city coun-
cil and the various units constituting
the new Community service, formerly
the Federation of Charities. These
societies will carry on a great share
of their welfare work there, and the
house will be run in co-operation with
the local Y. M. C. A.
LAWS FROLICA' AT
ANNUAL FESTIVAL
fRed, white, and blue sounded a
patriotic note in the decorative scheme
of the annual Crease dance of the sen-
ior laws, which was held last night in
the old Union building. The programs
were drawn up in legal form and un-
der each of the 16 dance numbers
were quotations from law text books
with suitable and appropriate com-
ment added.
A dancing act, a song trio, a solo
by Garrett Pat Conway, and a special
song composed for the occasion by
A. J. Gornetzky, ';19L, were features
of this entertainment. The Crease
paper, written by A. J. Levin and his
aides, was distributed during the in-
termission, Lunch was served in the
banquet hall of the old Union.
L. J. Carrigan was chairman of the
committee in charge and the chaper-
ones were Dean Henry M. Bates and
Mrs. Bates, Prof. Edson R. Sunderland
and Mrs. Sunderland, and Prof. Wil-
lard T. Barbour and Mrs. Barbour.
SALARY QUESTION
TOPIC IN ALUMNUS
Discussion of the conditions regard-
ing University professors' salaries
opens the editorial columns of the
March number of the Michigan Alum-
nus which appeared Thursday.
Included in the issue is an urgent
plea to the alumni for funds to secure
the completion of the new Michigan
Union building. Statement is made
to the effetc that only 12,301 out of
30,000 living alumni have subscribed.
Prof. Jesse S. Reeves has contrib-
uted an article endorsing strongly the
League of Nations. Among the other
writers in this issue are Dean Alfred
H. Lloyd, Prof. S. F. Kimball of the
fine arts department, Mr. Earl V.
Moore, and Prof. L. J. Young of the
forestry department.

Do the students in the literary col-r
lege want compulsory class assem-f
blies?l
After inquiring as to whether or not r
the students were in favor of thet
plan, the Student council appointed
a committee to take the matter up
with the authorities of the college.
Various representative men and wom-
en of the different campus organiza-
tions were questioned with the fol-
lowing results:
Cause no Confusion
Ralph E. Gault, '19, president of the
Student council: "I am strongly in
favor of compulsory literary assem-
blies. We have a plan formed which
we think can be put into effect with
little confusion. t
"If the women and men of the cam-
pus are in favor of these compulsory
assemblies I think this fact ought to
induce the faculty to start the sys-'
tem as son as possible."
Aids Class Spirit
Doris C. McDonald, '19, president ofI
the Women's league: "I am sure thatz
the women on the campus would bet
glad to see the realization of this
project."t
L. A. Lundquist, '19, president of the
senior lit class "The compulsory as-t
semblies are the only thing I canI
see to instill class spirit into every
member of the literary college."
Emily Powell, '19, president of New-r
berry residence and vice-president ofI
the Women's league: "The proposedf
method for assemblies would be anI
excellent thing for the unity of thet
classes."
D. M. Springer, '19E, president of the
Union: "The plan has worked fine in
the engineering College, and there is
no reason why it should not meet with
eual success in the lit school. I
heartily approve of it"
U.S. FIGHTERS' PICTURES
SHOWNBYR. "BALISS
Pictures showing realistically the
stages through which the American
soldiers went in reaching the front,
from the cantonments and parade
scenes in London and Paris to the
front line trenches, were the feature
of Dr. Charles T. Bayliss' lecture last
night in Hill auditorium.
The thoroughness with which the
Hun devastated the beautiful cities of
Rheims, Noyons and many others was
shown in the pictures and in direct
contrast to this, 'scenes of the un-
harmed Rhineland were depicted.
Many illustrious scenes such as the
signing of the armistice and the joy-
ful heralding of the news at the front
were also featured among the great
number of fine views shown.
BIG PROGRAM ARRANGED FOR
ALL-SOPI SMOKER TONIGHT
If a program bringing in several of
the best campus speakers and acts by
Phil Diamond's 10 piece Jazz orches-
tra and other entertainers can contrib-
ute toward an enjoyable evening, the
All-Soph smoker at the Union this
evening is going to be some show.
Plenty of eats and smokes have of
course been provided.
Dean Marcus L. Ward of the den-
tal college and C. T. Van Dusen, '19E,
of the Student Council, will address
the Sophomores on subjects of inter-
est. E. T. Usher, '21, general chair-
man of the Soph Prom committee, will
announce the plans that have been
made for this coming event.

STUDENT, COUNCIL
WANTS OLD GAMES
Return of Former Class Rushes De-
sired; Plans for Spring
Laid Out

'GENSTOCKINGS'
COMEDY CLUB PLAY

I

Selection Is Well Known Success in
Theatrical World; First Appear-
ance Here

p-lause from representatives
states.
s es.Creates Sensaton

MOB

of

HAZING EMPHATICALLY
OPPOSED BY ALL MEMBERS

Tentative plans for the senior
"swing out" and the spring games;
were made at a special meeting of the
Student council Thursday evening. W.
W. Hinshaw, '20, was appointed chair-
man of the committee to arrange for
the "swing out." J. I. McClintock, '19,
is chairman of the spring games com-
mittee.
Every effort will be made to bring
the spring games back to their former
place. The faculty will be consulted
in an effort to reinstate pushball.
The new constitution for the coun-
cil was passed on as a whole. It will
be subjected to the committee on non-
athletic student affairs and then will
be voted on by the entire -campus at
the annual All-Campus election.
The subject most discussed at the
meeting was that of hazing. The coun-
cilmen were firm in denouncing mob
hazing.
SPEAKERS, JUDGES FOR
ORATOICALMEETONMED
Drawing of lots for places on the
program of the 29th annual Univer-
sity oratorical contest of the North-
ern Oratorical league took place Fri-
day afternoon. Morris Paris, '19, will
be first with "The Eternal Fog;" E.
0 Brinkman, '20, follows with "A No
Man's Land of Ostracism;" Carl G.
Brandt, '21L, will present "Our Mod-
en Modern Babel;" Donald C, Shel-
ton's, '21, selection will be "The
Marne;" and Alice M. Hoelzle, '19,
will speak last on "The Voice of Ar-
menia."
Regent Beal to Preside
With little changes, the speeches
are the ones which secured the con-
testants honors in the class prelimin-
ary contests held two weeks ago. Re-
gent Junius E. Beal will preside at the
contest which will be held at 8 o'clock
Monday evening in University hall.
Judges for the contest are announc-
ed as Dean Alfred H. Lloyd, of the
Graduate school; Registrar Arthur G.
Hall; Dean John R. Effinger; Dean E.
H. Kraus, of the summer session;
Dean William H. Butts and Prof.
George W. Patterson, of the engineer-
ing college; Miss Grace Greenwood,
social director of Martha Cook dormi-
tory; and Mrs. Margaret Irving Wal-
lace, social director at Alumnae house.
Winner to Be Honored
The winner of the contest-.will rep-
resent Michigan in the Northern Ora-
torical league contest to be held early
in May, besides securing the Kaufman
testimonial of $100 and the bronze
' nedal presented by the Chicago alum-!
ni. Second place will secure the Kauf-
man testimonial of $50.

PROF. HOLLISTER DIRECTS PRO-
DUCTION; SURE OF SUCCESS
Comedy club announces "Green
Stockings" as its 1919 production.
The piece is a sparkling, straight
comedy from the pen of A. E. W. Ma-
son, and was written in 1911. While
the play is new to the campus, it nev-
er having been given a local produc-
tion, it is well known to the theatrical
world as a constantly revived suc-
cess. It was given perhaps its most
famous. presentation at the hands of
Margaret Anglin and H. Reeves Smith,
who did much to bring the public to
a realization of the merit of the play.,
Prof. Hollister, Director
.prof. R. D. T. Hollister, of the ora-
tory department, has consented to di-
rect the production of "Green Stock-
ings," since he will .not be occupied
with the direction of the annual Ora-
torical association play which will" nt
be given this year.
- "The play should prove a distinct
success," declared Professor Hollis-
ter before the Comedy club, "inas-
much as it will be the only campus
theatrical production of the year that
I know of which will be modern in
character and acted by both men and
women." ~
Work to Start Now
"Although the exact date of the pre-
, sentation has not yet been decided,
work will begin immediately,' 'declared
Richard A. Forsyth, '20, president of
the club. "It is our ambition to stage
a finished production as nearly pro-
fessional as possible."
Members of Comedy club who wish
to try out for parts in the play,
should report at 9 o'clock Saturday
morning in University hall, at which
time Professor Hollister will make se-
lections. Freshmen are not eligible
to take part.
INLANDER TO BE[COME'
ALL-CAMPUS MAGAZINE
Instead of being an exclusively lit-
erary publication, the Inlander is to
become an All-Campus magazine,
more truly representative of the Uni-
versity as a whole. Decision to this
effect was reached yesterday after-
noon at a meeting of the editorial
s-taff.
Beginning with the April issue,
there will be a department devoted
to freshman interests and edited by
freshmen; sections for each of the
colleges and schools of the University;
and a space given over to campus or-
ganizations of general interest. There
will also be columns for faculty mat-
ters.
The changes will necessitate in-
creasing the size of the magazine con-
siderably.

- "The band made a wonderful im-
pression in the now famous 'maize
and blue uniforms, as it played the
Victors' as, only the Michigan band
can play it," states a telegram receiv-
ed :Friday night from the assistant
director of the band. "We created a
big sensation and showed that the
University is on the map. We were
the official andonly band here."
Delegation Largest
Besides Michigan, which had thE
largest delegation at the convention
Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and Wisconsin
were represented.
At a meeting of the Michigan dele
gation, of which the chief speaker was
the Hon. Mr. Vanderberg, of Grand
Rapids, Captain Wilfred Wilson led
the band in several opening number.
and also incidental music throughou
the afternoon's program.
. Notable Speakers
Among the chief speakers who ad
dressed the conference were Gen
Leonard Wood, Secretary of the Treas
ury Carter H. Glass, and Brig. Get
Louis C. Covell, who told of the gal
lant work of the thirty-second divi
sion on the battle-front.
Mr. Frederick R. Fenton, federal re
serve director of sales for Michigar
extended a vote of thanks to the Var
sity band for their work in addin
zest to the meetings and leading th
Michigan delegates in yells.
1-HOP TICKETS MAILED
0N RECEIPT OF W R T
Tickets for the J-Hop were maile
Friday evening to all those who hav
paid the war tax. The remainder wi
be sent out as soon as the money t
cover the tax is received.
More than 300 tickets were distril
uted Friday which means that onE
half went out on the first day. ApplI
cations are on hand to more tha
fill the number which is to be sold.
. Ask for List of Girls
Fraternities are asked to make u
a list of the girls tQ be in the
booths, and to give this list to Ka
Velde. The towns from which tb
girls come should be include als
This list is for 'the use of The Dail
in putting out the Hop extras, whkt
have proven so popular in the pa
years.
To Draw for Booths Saturday
Drawing for booths by fraternitiE
will be held in the lobby of the o
Union at 1 o'clock Saturday afte
noon. No discrimination can be show
by this method of booth selection.
An explanation of the offer of Nev
berry residence by Dean Myra Jorda
3 will be given by Karl Velde, '20, chai
man of the J-Hop committee at
o'clock Saturday afternoon on tl
second floor of the new Union. A
independents interested in this matt(
should be present.

.

-- -

3.

I

TODAY

i

ALL -CAMPUS

MIXER

2:30p.m.
Barbour

TODAY
2:30 p. m.
Barbour

Gym

Under auspices of MASQUES

Tickets 25c

Gym

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