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March 21, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

a =-

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
COLDER

All-ago

40
A!a
Amw t

iIaiI

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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VOL. XXIX. No. 120. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

CONORDT WTH PROFESSOR FROM
ONCORDIT WITH ROME TO LECTURE
Thirty thousand miles in 13 months
UNof lecturing were covered recently by
Dr. Charles T. Baylis, who will de-
liver his war travelogue, "With the
CROWICTORY Doughboys from Paris to the Rhine,"
at 8 o'clock Friday evening in Hill
PARTY FEELING FURNISHING auditorium.
STICKS TO BELABOR Dr. Baylis witnessed fighting inside
the German lines before the United
DEMOCRATS States entered the war, and he is
known as "the man who refused to
SOLE WISH TO WORK be the guest of Kaiser Bill." Hehas
FOR IDEALS OF BOTH just returned from the war zone.
The lecture is under the auspices of
British Rave Sought to Reconie the University Oratorical association
and the admission will be 35 cents.
Views of French and Am- Slides and 1,000 feet of film will il-
ericans lustrate Dr. Baylis' lecture. It is plan-
ned to throw some of the best war
(By Associated Press) songs on the canvas; soloists will
Paris, March 2Q.-Under a Posen" sing the verses and the audience will
date of March 19 the Havas corres- in in -the chorus.
pondeat says that the Germans, hav-
ing refuse to sign the terms virtu- PRESIDENTS TO AID
sly agreed upon through negotia- IN ALL-CAMPUS MIXER
tions, have been considered by the
Allies as broken off. The correspond-
ent adds that the Germans are quit- Presidents of all University classes
ting Posen immediately. will assist the introduction committee
at the All-Campus mixer to be given
London, March 20.-The League of by Masques Saturday afternoon in Bar-
Nations controversy in the United bour gymnasium. The plan of re-
Natos contrversy in the Unied quiring formal introductions among
tates as bearing upon the English students, which was initiated at the
attitude is the subject of the following last mixer, will be facilitated, it is
commnent in the London Times. hoped, by having the class presidents
"Crown of Victory". aid students in filling out their p'ro-
"The English without distinction of grams.
party, regard a bettero'understanding Chaperones for the mixer are Dean
with Americans as the crown of vic- Myra B. Jordan, Miss Lucy E. Elliott,
tory. Prof. and Mrs. J. Raleigh Nelson, and
"It is unfortunate for the ideal so Prof. and Mrs. C. O. Davis. The com-
many of us on both sides of the At- mittee in charge of the occasion con-
lantic have at heart that party feeling sts of Jean Maclennan, '19, Mary
should be running so high just now in Overman, '19, Beatrice McKnight, '19,
America and that we who are working and Isabelle Swah, '22.l
withPreidet Wlsonin ari shuld The receipts of the mixer will be
with President Wilson in Paris should used toward paying the $100 royalty
furnish the sticks with which the Re- ued or Qay te a rriy
publcan arebelborng te Dmo-required for "Quality Street," a Barrie
publicans are belaboring the Demo- comedy which Masques will present
ratsr May 8 and 9. Tickets will be limited
"Outr sole 'wish is' to work with the to 500 and may be secured at Wahr's
American people in what we believe Busy Bee, and University hall.
to be as much their Ideals and inter Buy ____ad ____sy____
eats as our own."W EH
Two iewsWOMEN TO H AVE
The Times points out that there ANNUAL BANQUET
were at the opening of the conference --
tw, general views about the kind of Women of the University will hold
peace that the world ought to have- their fifth annual banquet at 5:30
the French view, and the American o'clock on April 2 in Barbour gym-
view, and adds: nasium. Attendance is not restricted
"There is no question of our in- ,to women registered as students, but
posing a policy of our own at the con- is 'to include alumnae, wives of the
ference. Our policy, has been that of faculty and league house heads.
mediator. Wat we have done was to Alumnae tickets may be secured at
seek to reconcile so far as possible Dean Jordan's office for 75 cents.
the French and American views." Women active in the University may
-_secure tickets for 50 cents from Mar-
cella Moon, '21. They will also be
sold on Friday, March 28, Monday,
Unim UI iHULi li U iL U March 31, and Tuesday, April 1, In
TO E SUBJECT OfTALKUniversity hall.
TECHNIC TO HOLD
GERALD THAYER, AUTHORITY ON ANNUAL BANQUET;
DISGUISING ART, TO SPEAK]
APRIL 4 The Technic staff wil hold its an-
nual banquet at 8 o'clock Friday
What will probably be one of the evening at the Delta cafe.
F. W. Parsons, '20E, and W. F.
most interesting of the year's lectures TschaechearOnE, willbe installed in
at the University will be given by Mr. the offices of managing editor and
Gerald Thayer, co-author of a work business manager, respectively, suc-
on camouflage which is aid to have ceeding W. C. Babbitt, '19E, andt
been used largely by European arm- Dow, '19E. Prof. E. M. Bragg will t
les, on April 4 in Hill auditorium He present medals to the members of the1
Ies n Aril4 i Hil auitoium Heoutgoing staff, and Prof. J. R. Nelson1
will explain the principles of camou- wil give a short talk. Parsons will
flage, or concealing coloration, in war act as toastmaster.
and nature, a subject that he is an

authority on. He brings with him Thief Returns and Admits Crime
views to illustrate the methods and Following the theft of a watch, c
viwstoills trat th n e todsn d some pieces of jewelry, and six or a
applications of this new science, eight dollars in cash from the homey
With his father, Mr. Abbot Thayer of Louis Springer at 601 Mary street a
the eminent artist, Mr. Thayer became last Saturday, a mai giving his name c
interested in the concealing coloration as Otto Krueger was arrested here
of 'animals a number of years ago. yesterday, and confessed to the burg- f.
The Thayers published in 1906 an lary.
he Ta e rs pubklisthed in t 1906 h an Krueger left for Detroit after the d
elaborate book on the subject which robbery, but returned to Ann Arbor 1
immediately attracted the attention yesterday, when his arrest was effect- E
of naturalists and others interested ed by officers Soldt and Marz.
in the this new field both in this coun-

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WORK Of MEDICAL
SCHOOLIN TALKS
WAR HAS OPENED LARGE FIELD
FOR 'PHE MEDICAL PRO-
FESSION
DEAN THINKS INTERN
YEAR MOST IMPORTANT
Dean Vaughan Gven Credit for Suc
Mess of Medical School at Fnal
Exercises
"Due to the interest created in med
icine by the war the class of 1919 1
entering the profession at the psycho-
logical moment," stated Dr. John
Dodson, dean of Rush medical school
in his commencement address given
at 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall, "and I
feel that this interest should not re-
lax."
As to the "intern year," which was
the subject of his talk, he said that
he felt that it was the most impor-
tant 'time in the young dotcor's life.
Although no year could be omitted,
each leading to the other, and each
being slightly more important than
the preceding one, the intern period
affects to a great measure the physi-
cian's future success. He also stated
that he was in favor of internships
which were longer than one year, as
long as five or six perhaps. The use
of this system in Europe has been the
cause of their turning out so many
leaders in medicine and its absence in
America the reason that we produce
so few. He also sketched the devel-
opment in the teaching of medicine
since its start in America in 1775.
At the luncheon which preceded the
graduation, Dr. C. B. Burr of Flint
was among those who responded to
toasts. He spoke on the psychology of
the medical stdent. President Harry
B. Hutchins told of the developments
in the medical school since 1887. To
Dean Victor C. Vaughan he credited
this advance. Carl Badgeley, presi-
der of the senior medical class, spoke
on the indebtedness of the graduating
class to the faculty of the medical
school.
1.0 0o NOT TO BE SHOWN
IN, DETROITTHIS YEAR
NO THEATER COULD BE RENTED
IN DETROIT SO OPERA GOES
TO PORT HURON
Inability of the Union to rent a
theater will prevent a showing of
'Come On Dad" in Detroit. It was
"cheduled to appear there the night
f April 9, but will be. taken to Port
Jluron instead.
No Theaters Available
None of the leading theaters in De-
roit was available, the Union found.
attempts were made to obtain a
maller house, but nothing at all suit-
ble was to be had. It was decided
Thursday atfernoon, therefore, to go
o Port Huron inestead. The alumni
,here. are evry anxious to have the
roduction come, and promise a full
ouse, and good entertainment for
nembers of the company.
Many Detroiters Expected Here
It is expected /that many Detroit
eople will come to Ann Arbor for one
f the productions here, as consider-

ble interest has been manifested. It
Hill be advertised in Detroit, and mail
rders filled in the order they are re-
eived.
There are still many seats unsold
or the Wednesday night and Satur-
ay afternoon performances. For the
emaining performances they have
argely been taken. E. Mortimer Shut-
r, director, said last night that the
(Continued on Page Six)

MEDIC GRADUTES
FORM ASSOC IATION
STOIENIST9ALUMNI
D NEW CRADATES SENSE LACK O
ALUMNI SUPPORT IN ALL
FIELDS'-
H. W. PORTER NAMED
TEMPORARY PRESIDENT
Plan to Keep in Touch with Wha
Is Going on in Various Activ-
ities in :Medical School
With the purpose of establishing
5 fellowships and bringing the alumn
of the Medical school into more inti-
mate contact with the affairs of the
school and undergraduates, a Medica
Alumni association was formed at a
special meeting of the senior class
- held at 11:30 o'clock Thursday morn-
ing.
Alumni Not Organized
Michigan, not being an endowed
school is distinctly handicapped as
compared with other institutions hav-
ing greater resources, and many good
men have been lost for this reason,
The alumni, also, due . to the loose
structure of the present alumni as-
sociation, have not been able to keep
in touch with the school'and thus give
assistance when needed.
The association which was formed,
although it is only a temporary or-
ganization, is planing a most vigor-
ous campaign to enlist the support of
all fromer graduates. The members
of this class will automatically be-
come charter members. All classes
following them will be expected to
join and support the institution.
Upon them, in a great part depends
its success, it was stated.
Officers Elected
At the meeting which was held
Thursday the following men were
elected as temporary officers: Presi-
dent, Horace W. Porter; vice-presi,
dent, Theophile Raphael; secretary
'treasurer, Henry Moes; faculty advis-
or, 'Dr. James G. Van Zwaluwenberg,
professor of roentgenology.
BOOTHS FOR 1-HOP TO
BE ALLOTTED SATUDA
TICKETS FR BIG EVENT TO BE
SENT TODAY OR TO. 1=
MORROW
I
Drawing for J-Hop booths by the
fraternities giving house partie) will
be held at 1 o'clock Saturday after-
noon in the lobby of the old Union.
It is thought b the Hop committee
that this will be as fair a method as
could be foind since it has proven
satisfactory in past years.. This will
do away with any of the hard feeling
or 'dissatisfaction which might arise
by the use of some other devise.
Tickets for the Hop are to be mail-
ed out some time Friday or Satur-
day by. W. G. Harbert, the chairman
of the ticket committee. Karl Velde,
'20, chairman of the Hop committee,
is making arrangements with the taxi
companies of the city by which a uni-
form rate will be charged. As yet he
has encountered no difficulties in lin-
ing up the companies.
It is probable that the same rate

of $2 will be charged, except in the
case when both couples come from the
same house. Some firms are willing
to give a lower rate in this case.
All men interested in keeping their
visiting girls at the Newberry resi-
dence should meet at 2 o'clock Satur-
day afternoon on the second floor of
the new Union. Karl Velde will ex-
plain the details of the offer, of the
dormitory by Dean Myra B. Jordan.

WOMEN'S HONORARY
TO CONVENE HERE,

Mortarboard, national hnorary se-
nior society for college women, wil
hold its first biennial convention fro
April 25 to April 29 in Ann Arbor
Delegates from a number of other in-
stitutions, including Cornell univer-
sity, the University of Illinois, th
University of Colorado, Ohio State
university, and Swarthmore college
will be guests of the local chapter
during that time.
The program has been arranged to
include an equal division of business
and entertainment. A banquet on
t Friday night will open the conven-
tion. It will be followed Saturday
morning by a meeting in Lane hall,
noon luncheon in Foster's tea rooms,
and a reception Saturday afternoon in
Martha Cook dormitory, at which
SDean Myra B. Jordan, as hostess, will
- introduce the visiting delegates to all
senior women of the University. -
i The convention will close informal-
ly Sunday morning with an up-river
breakfast for the guests.
BIG DEMAND FOR
ECONOMICS GRADS
Several letters have been received
by Prof. I. Leo Sharfman, of the Eco-
nomics department, asking for recom-
mendations of students of economics
for business positions.
Professor Sharfcan has been ask-
ed by officials of the Michigan Agri-
cultural college to name a man for a
position as assistant in accounting
in the department of markets in the
college. A man who has had some
experience in farming is preferred.
The recommended man, who will be
placed on a civil service status with
a salary of approximately $2,000, must
be satisfactory to the United States
Burtau of Markets as well as to col-
lege officials.
A letter has been received from a
Chicago employment concern speak-
ing for a large weekly trade jourial
which desires to establish a depart-
ment of econocics and labor. A man
trained in economics, business meth-
ods, policy, and efficiency is to be plac-
ed in charge with a salary of about
$2,500. The concern prefers that a
recent college graduate with some
practical experience be chosen. The
position is one which offers splendid
opoprtunities for advancement.
All persons interested should see
Professor Sharfman.
REFUSED TO BE GUEST
OFGERMAN EX-KAISER
Prof. Charles Upson Clark will give
a lecture illustrated with moving pic-
tures and slides at 8 o'clock April 2
in Hill auditorium, his subject being
"With Italy at War."
The Italian government, whom Pro-
fessor Clark represents, will furnish
the slides and films. The lecture is
given under the auspices of the Uni-
versity and no admission will be
charged.
Professor Clark is at present di-
rector of the American School of
Classical Studies at Rome, and pre-
vious to that he was for many years
a professor at Yale university.
What is considered the best lecture
of last season, according to the Uni-
ersity authorities, was given by Pro.-
essor Clark. O
af GIVEN RECEPTION
Miss Dora Barnes, of Brooklyn, New
York, and a graduate of Johns Hop-
kinsiollege, who is to be a professor
of public health nursing in the Uni-
verstO, was tendered a formal re-

ceptiorif Thursday evening at Martha
Cook by Dean Myra B. Jordan and the
social directors of the different halls'
on the cadipus.
More tahn 300 were present at the
reception, 'ncluding many members of
the faculty.

VARSITY BAND IN'
CHICAGO; TO PLAY
AT TWO MEETINS

PARADED THROUGH ANN ARBOR
STREETS BEFORE DE.
PARTRE
LARGE CROWD GIVES
SEND OFF AT STATION
Captain Wilson Confident of a Good
Snowing on Initial Trip; 35
in Band
Parading all the streets in the
neighborhood of the campus playing
the University songs, the Varsity band
left Thursday night at 10:42 for Chi-
cago, where it will play at the meet-
ing of the county chairmen for the
fifth Liberty loan.
In a triumphant march down State
street to the Michigan Central sta-
tion the band was greeted with cheers
and loud applause by the many peo-
ple who thronged to 'their doors. A
short rehearsal was held Thursday
night.
Captain Wilfred Wilson, director of
the band, said, "The band has never
been in better musical condition. The
men who made this trip have all had
previous experience with the organi-
zation, and their playing will add
prestige to the name of Michig'an. The
35 men going to Chicago are the pick
of the band, which is the best in many
states."
The band will arrive in Chicago at
7 o'clock and will then be taken to
the La Salle station. It will play at
the afternoon and morning sessions of
the Liberty Loan meetings, and will
return at midnight to Ann Arbor. The
men will have the evenings to them-
selves.
Catpain Wilfred Wilson, Treasurer
Robert A. Campbell, and Registrar
Arthur G. Hall will make the trip
with the folloiwng men:
E. F. Apple, '21; D. C. Arner, '19D;
E. H. Beerink, '21; H. A. Brinker,
'21E; U. A. aCrpenter, '22M; G. W
Collins, '19P; G. H. Cummings, '21;
W. G. Colin, '22; J. C. Edwards,'.20E;
H. R. Every, '20E; M. R. Fox, 19E;
H. J. Goodwin, '19D; P. W. Husted,
'20E; F. E. Jacobs, '21; I. D. Lunfby
'21E; R. L. McCutcheon, '19; H. P.
McNaughton, '21E; R. F. Merner, '20L;
J. D. Miller, '21; E. A. Osirs, '21M;
L. H. Phelps, '21E; E. J. Porter, '21;
S. J. Rubley, '20M; J. F. Sander, '21;
L. Sayner, '19E; H. S. Sherman, '21E;
H. C. Seeley, '21E; F. M. Smith, '22;
H. F. Stotzer, '20; B. F. Thomas, '22;
A. R. Wagner, '20A; H. S. Wensenius,
'20E; E. F. Merrill, '20M.
About 25 men of the band were un-
able to go to Chicago, but in the near
future it is probable that they will be
taken. Captain Wilson expressed the
hope that plans would mature by
which Michigan could be represented
by a complete band.
SENIOR LAW CLASS .
TO SWING DANCE
Tickets have been selling rapidly
for the Crease dance of the senior
laws 'to be held at 9 o'clock Friday
evening in the old Union building, ac-
cording to John L. Simpson, '19L,
chairman of the ticket committee. But
10 were left late Thursday night, and
if these are not sold to senior laws
before morning, students irrespective
of class and college may buy them.
Abraham J. Gornetzky, '19L, has
written a song in honor of the Crease
dance, which he will sing Friday even-
ing.
A lunch will be served in the ban-
quet hal of the new Union during the
intermission. ancing will last until 2
o'clock.

i
a
9

try an
One
of the
that a
them
loking
they s
colored

t-

d abroad.
of the results of the studies
se two men was the discovery
nimals may be painted to hide
in several other ways than by
like their background. In fact
howed that the most strikingly
d animals may be thereby seem-
obliterated.
lecture will be complimentary
Michigan Academy of Science
the Michigan Schoolmasters'
but it will also be free to the

i

TO-NIGHT

TO-NIGHT

DR. CHA RLES T. BA YLIS talks on

DEDICATE TREES TO DEAD
Washington, March 20.-Na-
tion wide observance of Arbor
day, through the planting of
trees dedicated to soldiers who
dide during the war was urged
today by Secretary Huston in a
letter to governors of the
states. He asserted he could not
conceive a better way to keep
alive the memory of those who
had fallen for their country.

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With the Dough-boys." 2
HILL J9UDITORIUM
8:oo -P. .

--- w

zooo ft. of ivar-film and 150 Slides
FRIDA Y, NA RCH 2fi
Admission 3 cents

p. ,*, -

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