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March 20, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-20

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY; BECOMING
UNSETTLED 2

Jle
all

tilij

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIIt
SERVICE

I

I

VOL. XXIX. No. 119. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS
____________ I

KREA UNFIT FOR
SEF 6.YRMN
CLIMS DR.,SOPER
POLITICAL AGITATOR S STIR PEO-
PLLE UP OVER NEW EM-
PEROR
INFLUENTIAL NATIVES
FAVOR JAPANESE RULE
Old Administration Marked by Better
Methods in Farming, Finance.
and Transportation
' (By Associated Press)
Washington, March 19.- American
government agents in the orient have1
been asked for information regarding
reports that during the independ-
enee demonstrations in Korea the
American council at Seoul was ar-
rested by Japanese soldiers, and Am-
erican missionaries, including wom-
en, subjected to indignity.
Madison, N. J., March 19.-The re-
volution in Korea was described today
as "wildfire agitation with the people
as yet unfit for self government," by
Reverand Dr. E. D. Soper, a profes-
sor in the Drew Theological semin-
ary here, who has just returned from
a seven mouths' tour of the far east,
part of which was spent in Korea.
Dr, Soper was of the opinion that
jitwithstanding abuses of power by
some of the Japanese the Koreans
were otter off under Japanese con-
trol than when they were independent,

TRIANGLES ELECT
TWO NEW MEMBERS
Two junior engineers were taken in-
to Triangles at the initiation rdlununn
to Triangles at the initiation held at
4:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon un-
der the engineering arch. The ini-
tiates were extended the usual priv-
ilege of giving the Triangle design a
thorough sapolio bath, shining each
others shoes with the same material,
and entertaining the onlookers with
wild and weird tales of bears and
spooks.
Those initiatd were Henry N. An-
drews, '20E, and Howard N. Collins,
'20E.
PROFESSOR A.'EL WHITE
RETURNS FROM WARWORK
fADE CHIEF OF TECHNICAL
STIAFF OF ORDNANCE DE-
PARTMENT

+Japanese Untactfult
What the Koreans complained of asf
misrule he attributed to the inaptitude
of the Japanese in handling a big andr
delicate problem and not to any wil-t
ful' desire to injure or exploit the
Koreans, "Many influential Koreans."
he said, "favored Japanese control,
but. they are not in the majority."'
Politlea Agitators r
Among the chief causes of the up-t
rising, according to Dr. Soper therel
is a widespread talk of "self determ-
lnation of small nations," fostered by
agitation and the recent step of Yit
IHeut, the former emperor who made
a Japanese prince of Korea, when he
was -deposed. When the ex-emperor,
died last January, Korean women ,
wailed for days at the palace gates.
This was aggrevated by a report that
the emperor had committeed suicide!
in disgrace over the bethrothal of a,
son to a Japanese princess. Political
agitators took this opportunity to stir
up the people and reminded them that
they might obtain independence for
(Continued on Page Six)
Engineers Revive
Class Banquets
Assemblies for both the fresh-
man and the senior 'engineering class-
es were held Wednesday. in the En-
gineering building.
The meeting of the senior engineers
was, called to discuss plans for the
cla.ss dinner which is to be held on.
Friday evening at 6:30 o'clock in the
new Union building. The plan of
holding class dinners, periodically is
a return to the old custom that for-
merly held in the Engineering col-
lege. Prof. William D. Henderson of;
the physics department will be the
chief speaker. Roy _W.. Elliott, '19,
will act as toastmaster.
The regular weekly freshman as-
sembly was held at 11 o'clock on
Wednesday. Only class activities were
under discussion. Reports were heard
from various committees and it was
decided that a freshman engineer
dance should be held in the near fu-
ture.r

Albert E. White, assistant professorn
of chemical engineering, returned
Tuesday to the University after an ab-r
sence of almost two years, duringr
which time he received the commis-i
sion of major in the military serviced
of the United States, and attained thet
position of chief of the metallurgicalp
department of the technical staff of
the ordnance department.
Enlisted as Civiliana
Professor White entered the servicet
of the government in June, 1917, as ac
civilian and was made chief of thed
nietallurgical branch of the inspec-
tion division of the ordnane depart-
ment in July, 1917. In August he re-n
ceived the commission of captain. His
duties then consisted in the inspec-
tion of artillery ammunition, shells,
fuses and cartridge cases.
Professor White remained in charge
of this work until January, 1918, when
the whole ordnance department was
reorganized.
The inspection division was then
given the inspection of all ordnance
including artillery ammunition, can-
non, small arms, small arm ammuni-
tion, carriages, tanks, and tractors.-
Professor White was commissioned as
major in January, 1918, and made
chief of the metallurgical branch of
that division.
Made Chief of StaffI
In 1919 the ordnance departmente
was again reorganized and Professor'
White, then major White, was made
chief of the technical staff of the
Ordnance department. The technical<
staff had final authority on all matters
which included phases of engineering,t
design and inspection.
In telling of his work as 'chief of
this staff, Professor White says, "The
ordnance department was divided into
13 districts. There were branch of-
fices in Boston, Philadelphia, Roches-
ter, New York, Baltimore, Philadelph-
ia, Pittsburg,kCincinnati, St. Louis,
Chicago, Toronto, Cleveland and De-'
troit. The work got so heavy that it
was necessary to establish a district
inspecting metallurgist in each dis-
trict office. Also, a supervising engi-
neer of tests was also needed for
every office.
"In the inspection division alone
were 30,500 employees on the day that
the armistice was signed, and the de-
partment had approximately 500 engi-
neers of tests and 200 chemists at
work.
"The metallurgical branch had di-
rect supervision of all inspection of
the work of steel mills, of steel cast-
ing plants, of all cannon forging
plants, and in all plants wherein any
heat treatment was used. Also, the
work of copper and zinc smelters
was supervised."
Tribute to Michigan MIen
Professor White resigned his posi-
tion on March 10, 1919. He was very
anxious to pay tribute to the work of
Miichigan men in the war. " con-
santly came in contact with Michi-
gan men in charge of affairs. Mich-
igan men were chosen because they
were suited to the work"
Round-Up Club Initiates Thursday
Seventeen oandidates for the Round-
Up club will b initiated at 7:30
o'clock Thursday evenig on the cam-
pus. Due to the inability of the club
to secure the Union for its dances,
the membership limit has been reduc-
ed from 100 to 50. At present the
active membership totals about 30.

ISTRONOMERS CONVENE
IN ANN ARBOR IN FLL
DELEGATES TO COME FROM ALL
PARTS OF EUROPE AND
CANADA
For the first time in the history of
the University observatory, the Amer-
ican Astronomical society, composed
of the leading working astronomers
of the United States and Canada, will
hold its annual meeting in Ann Ar-
bor. The conference will begin about
September 1, 1919, and will last
three days.
Foreigners Represented
The society, which has been in ex-
istence for 20 years, is made up of
more than 200 American and 50 Cana-
dian members, every large observa-
tory in these two cAuntries which has
working astronomers, being repre-
sented. About a dozen foreign ob-
servatories including Grenwich, Ox-
ford, Vienna, Potsdam, and Cambridge,
also send representatives to the an-
nual gatherings.
At these meetings, reports of the
results of investigations by the va-
rious observatories as well as by the
individual members are made. Facts
discovered during the year preceding
the meeting are submitted and ex-
plained.
Announce Program Later
The University observatory ranks
with the average in equipment, aid its
telescope is one of the large size, ac-
cording to Prof. William J. Hussey,
director of the Observatory, who has
charge of the comig meeting. The
program for the conference will be
made out sometime in July.
GRANT IPLOMAS
TO SENiOR0 MEDICS
First Class in Forty Years to Be
Graduated During
March
STATE BOARD EXAMINER SAYS
FEW WILL NOT PASS EXAMS
The 1919 medical class will be the
first medical class to graduate in
March in 40 years. Commencement ex-
ercises will be held at 4:30 o'clock
Thursday afternoon in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall.
The entire medical school will be
excused in the afternoon in order to
attend the exercises. The address of
the day will be given by Dr. John
Dodson, of Rush medical college, Chi-
cago.
Although the enrollment of the
medical school is only 350, more than
400 tickets have been issued for the
luncheon which is to be held at 12:30
in Barbour gymnasium. ,
Many years ago the medical course
extended over two years only, each
academic year being but six months
long, bringing the commencement day
about the middle of March each year.
It was 40 years ago that the course
was lengthened to the regular acad-
emic year of nine months, thus mak-
ing the medical graduation coincide
with that of the other shools. The
change in date this year is not due
to any shortening of the course but
results from the fact that the senior
class took no vacation last summer
in order to meet the great demand fo
doctors caused by the war.

The last of the State Board exam-
inations were given Wednesday aft-
ernoon. Several students were given
the primary examination, which is giv-
en at the end of the second year and
nine men took both the primary and
final examinations. Finls alone were
given to 4$ seniors who were
Arthur D. Allen, Einer B. Anderson
Walter F. 1Each, Harold D. Barnard
Harry F. Bech;er, Lawrence G. Bein
hauer, William M. Bell, Norman C
Bender, Herriman E. Bozer, Catherin(
A. Brown, Edward J. Coram, Ceci
Corley, Casimir A. Damzalski, Don W
Gudakunst, George R. Hageman, Ed
gar S. Henry, Walter Johnson, Elmor
F. Lewis, William H. Ludwig, L. M
Lyons, Arthur B. McGray, Richar
McKean, Margaret A. Miller, Henri
Moes, C. Stewart Nash, Frank D
Novy, Robert C. Novy, Ira D. Odle
Earl D. Osborne, John P.. Parsons
Horace W. Porter, Theophile Raphae
Charles F. Roche, James W. Schmidt
(Continued on Page Six)

LEAGUE OF NATIONS ONE
WAY OUT, SASMAURICE
FIRST WAR ENGLAND EVER
FOUGHT AS WHOLE
NATION
(By Associated Press)
Paris, March 19.-The stuation in
Galicia was considered by the su-
preme council at its session this aft-
ernoon and It was decided to request
the Poles and Ukranans to cease hos-
tilities under certain conditions.
New York, March 19. - Because
"there is some hope of making war
impossible through a league of na-
tions, but no chance of doing it in any
other way," Major General Sir- Reder-
ick Maurice, former director of mili-
tary operations of the British General
Staff, declared here tonight that he
favored the project.
The general, who held his military
portfolio from 1915 to early in 1918
added his opinon that a great major-
ity of the British people are enthusi-
astic for the league plan.
General Maurice told interviewers
that for the first time in history the
British people had been in a war that
they didn't like. "Previous conflicts
with the enemy," he said, "had been
fought with the fleet, gold, and a pro-
portionately small army, but this time
the whole nation had been engaged.
For every American mother who had
lost a son, 15 British and 25 French
mothers were in mourning for the same
cause. This had a tremendous effect
4 popular sentiment, at least in
Great Britain, for an instrumentality
offering a chance of preventing fuure
wars.
DORMITORDY TO CAR E
FORD -HPGUESTS
Arrange to Furnish Accommodations
for Sixty Girls; Plan on No
Profit
ALL MEN INTERESTED TO MEET
SATURDAY AT UNION BUILDING
Independents who intend coming to
the J-Hop may make arrangements
by which their out-of-town partners
may secure not only accommodations,
but also entertainment for them at
the Newberry residence.
* Mrs. Myra B. Jordan, dean of wom-
en, has offered the dormitory for the
Puse of as many as 60 girls. Because
of this kindness it means thate the
trouble of boarding and rooming out
the girls will be avoided. These con-
veniences will be offered at a lower
1cost and will include more advan-
tages.
Accommodations for Two Days
Lodgings for Friday and Saturday
nights, dinners for Friday and Satur-
day nights and Sunday noon, and
3 tray breakfasts for Saturday and Sun-
day mornings. No lunch will be serv-
ed Saturday noon. No attempt to
make a profit will be made.
_ The offer does not stop at this, but
also includes maid service, proper
chaperons, and the use of the whole
building. Victrolas and pianos will
be at the use of the visitors, and it
t may be possible to arrange a dance
r for Saturday night if the men get to-
gether. They may also take all din-
r ners with their partners.
Meet Saturday
This action was made possible be-

- cause of the absence of many girls
during spring vacation. Karl Velde
'20, chairman of the Hop commit-
tee, announced Wednesday that a
meeting of all men interested in this
e proposition will be held at 2 o'clock
Saturday afternoon on the second
floor of the Union. At this meeting
all details as to prices and other
-things will be made known.
e JAMES CARTWRIGHT, '18L,
l IS VISITING IN ANN ARBOR
James Cartwright, '18L, is visiting
,e
in Ann Arbor after being discharge
d from the army in which he serve
y with the artillery in France. He jus
. recently passed the Illinois state ba:
e, examination in which 60 per cen
s, failed.
1, Cartwright will leave for Chicago
t, after the Crease dance Friday nigh
and will practice law in that city.

MICHIGAN NAVAL
UNIT ORGANIZES
Members of the Michigan Naval
Unit held their first banquet and re-
union Wednesday evening at the
Union. The units officers, Lieuts.
Hadden, McNeal, and Boak, and prac-
tically all of the members now in the
University were present.
Following the banquet a trial con-
stitution was submitted to the organ-
ization, and officers for the year elect-
ed. The chief purpose of the club
will be to compile a record of the
units' part in the war and keep the
members in touch with each other.tAt
present there are about 55 members
in the University and it is expected
that many more will return next year.
CITY HEALTH OFFICER
PROUNCSWATERSFE
TESTS MADE TWICE DAILY TO
DETECT IMPURITY; USE
CHLORINE GAS
There need be no fear of drinking
the city water in its present muddy
condition according to city health
officer, Dr. J. A. Wessinger, who is
making tests twice daily to catch the
first signs of impurity. Should the
water become unsuitable for drinking
purposes, due notice will be given.
The present condition of the water
Is due to the frozen ground which al-
lows no filtration before the surface
water reaches the river fromwhere
most of the city's supply is taken. It
is thought that this condition will
pass away within a few days.
As an additional safe-guard to the
public health the water is being treat-
ed with chlorine gas.
About five million gallons of water
is pumped from the Huron and an
additional 800,000 gallons from springs
daily to supply the city.
CLASS SPIRIT TO RULE
AT ALL-SOPH SMOKER
BETTER ORGANIZATION AIM OF
BIG MEETING AT
UNION
Sophomores of all the various de-
partments will have their first oppor-
tunity to show their real class spirit
at the All-Sophomore smoker which
is to be held at 7:30 o'clock Satur-
day evening, March 22, in the Union
Assembly room. The reason for hav-
ing all the second year men meet
in one assembly is to get the whole
class together in order that the class
may firmly organize. Subjects of com-
ing interest to all members of the
class of '21 will be discussed.
Eats and smokes will be amply pro-
vided and a program featured with
several surprises has been arranged
by H. S .Sherman, '21E, general chair-
man of the event who has been work-
ing in co-operation with the social
committees of the different classes. It
is expected that Prof. Marcus L.
Ward, dean of the dental college, and
C. T. Van Dusen, '19E, president of the
Engineering society, will be the prin-
cipal speakers of the evening and it is
rumored that the Salome dancer of
last year's Spotlight will be one of
the attracting features.
INLANDER FEATURES
ENGINEER'S S T O R Y

Impressions of military life gained
at Custer, with a decided satirical
caste is the substance of "Half-
Tales" by Mr. A. D. Conkey, of -the
rhetoric department, which is one o
the features of the Inlander, on sale
today.
An innovation appears in this issue
in the shape of a contribution from an
engineer-the first in seven or eigh
years. The story -is one of campus
, life by Roy E. Gindy, '21E, and i
called "Fifty-Fifty."
Stella Brunt. '22, who won such
g high praise last month for her poem
"Dreams," contributes again to thi
d issue the poem, "At Peak O' Dreams.
t A strong editorial also appear
r which is a frank opinon on the policy
t and control of the Union. It is no
antagonistic to the Union itself, bu
o to the way it is now governed.
t The magazine is on sale all over th
campus for 20 cents.

ARSITY BAND-TO
PLY AT CHICAG
LOAN CONVENTION
35 MEMBERS, REGISTRAR HALL
AND CAPT. WILSON TO ,
MAKE TRIP
LEAVE THURSDAY NIGHT
AFTER CAMPUS PARADE
Chicago Federal Reserve Bank to Pay
All Expenses; Will Boost
University
Playing Friday at Chicago before
notables such as Secretary of Treas-
ury Glass and more than 300 county
chairmen for the Liberty Loan drive
for Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, and
Indiana, the Varsity band will carry
the banner of publicity of the Univer-
sity into all the states of the Union.
The meeting of the chairmen of the
Seventh Federal reserve district will
be one of the most important Liberty
Loan meetings.
Play Michigan Music
From the-platform of the Auditor-
ium of Chicago, the band will play
such old college numbers as "Var-
sity," and "The Victors," mingled with
patr-iotic music. A member of the
band will lead the Michigan dele-
gates, many of whom .are University
graduates, in their old yells.
At both the morning and afternoon
sessions, the local organization wills
be the only band on the program. It
is with an entirely new repertoire'of
march numbers other than the college
music that the band will leave for
Chicago.
Thursday night at 10:42, the band
leaves for Chicago and will arrive at
7 o'clock Friday morning. The 3
men and Registrar Arthur G. Hall
and Captain Wilson who will make the
Irip, will be met at the station and
taken to the La Salle hotel in taxis.
'After breakfast the men will be at
leisure until 11 o'clock, when the
morning session opens. It is proba-
ble that the band will parade in the
streets before this meeting.
Return Friday Night
Both luncheon and supper will be
taken at the La Salle, and in the aft-
ernoon, the band will again play at
the Auditorium. The men will have
the' evening to themselves until mid-
night, when they will return to Ann
Arbor.
All expenses of the trip are being
paid by the Federal Reserve bank of
Chicago. Several attempts have been
made- before to have the band ap-
pear in Chicago, but conditions pro-
hibited it.
Rgistrar Arthur G. Hall said to the
band Wednesday night, "You have
every chance to make a name for
yourselves and spread the Univer-
sity's reputation by playing your best
and conducting yourself in a fine
manner. The result of your appear-
ance may greatly influence the legisla-
tion now pending in the legislature
as well as help the government in the
Liberty Loan drive."
Parade Before Leaving
Before leaving, the band will pa-
rade the streets in the neighborhood
of the campus between 9 and 10

o'clock.
What D'YeMIean?
e Lost . Your Dog?
f
Have you lost your dog? Or are you
elooking for a bargain in the canine
n department? In either case you will
t do well to look over the pup that the
- Ann Arbor traffic squadron collected
,s a few days ago.
Said squadron declares he never
h saw a nicer dog, and further inti-
, mates that the pup is an Airedale-
s that is, partly. He says the almost
Airedale has on several occasions ex-
s pressed a desire for a permanent
y home. Meanwhile the big policeman
t has the dog at his home, since Ann
t Arbor has no pound. Your immedi-
ate investigation is suggested, as the
e pup has developed an astonishing ap-
petite.

FI4 HMI N NEEDEI4
Freshmen are needed to work
o4 the National Building fund
cqmpaign to raise the money
necessary to complete the new
Union building. They shpuld re-
pprt to Homer L. Heath and aft-
ernppn at his office in the new
Union building,

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