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March 19, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATH)

WARMER
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ASSOCIATED
D RESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE I

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VOL. XXIX. No. 18.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1919.

PRICE THREE CENTS

t 1

SENITE MY MIKE
PEACE IFWILSON,
DOESNT SUCCEED
"U. S. IN CRITICAL SITUATION;
IDEALS ENDANGERED,"
SAYS LENROOT
CONGRESS HAS POWER
TO TERMINATE WAR
America Has Accomplished Her Pur-
pose; Formal Treaty with Ger-
many Is Unnecessary
(By Associated Press)
Paris, March 18. - An important
conference between President Wilson,
Premier Lloyd George, Premier Cie-
menceau, and Premier Orlando began
at 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. Lord
Robert Oeci, the British authority on
the League of Nations, was to dine
with the President at the Paris White
House tonight.
Washington, March 18. - If Presi-
dent Wilson does not negotiate a peace
treaty satisfactory to the senate, Sen-
ator Lenroot, of Wisconsin; republi-
can, said in an address on the League
of Nations before the Washington
Commercial club here tonight, con-
gress may pass a joint resolution sum-
martly ending the war with Germany
without a treaty, leaving American
participation, in the League of Na-
tions to future determination.
Lenroot Favors General Plan
Senator Lenroot declared he favored
the general plan of the league as pro-
posed but would not be coerced into
voting for the constitution as now
drawn without amendment.
"Ideals Endangered"
Asserting that the United States
today is in a most critical situation,
with American principles and ideals
endangered by the plans for the
league, Senator Lenroot continued,
"We are told that the President will
not permit peace with Germany unless
there is made as part of the peace
treaty the constitution of the league
as drawn in large part by.Great Brit-
ain. We are told that this will be
done to force the senate to accept
without amendment the British con-
stitution, revolutionizing our govevn-
ment and its foreign and domestc
policies. In other words the senate
is to be coerced to do something
which it otherwise would not do, and
public opinion in America is thus to be
coerced into demanding ratificaton.
(Continued on Page Six)
F R E S H ENGINEERS
ATTEND GATHERING
Two hundred and fifty Freshmen
engineers journeyed across the cam-
pus Tuesday evening to the Union
building to attend the first class so-
cial event of their college career. Ci-
der, doughnuts, and corncob pipes
were the features of the entertain-
ment if their appetites for the same
can be used as basis for estimation.
Prof. W. C. Hoad and Dean W. H.
Butts gave talks on the future work
of engineers and their requirements.
PROMINENT SPEAKER TO TALK
AT CONGREGATIONAL BANQUET
An interesting and prominent
speaker, an excellent menu, and a

good time are planned for the ban-
quet at 6 o'cldck Tuesday in the par-
lors of the Congregational church.
About 100 students and 30 faculty
men with their wives are expected.
Tickets are on sale at Wahr's.
".W' MEN TO HEAR YOS'[
Coach Fielding H. Yost will
arrive in Ann Arbor Monday,
March 24, for the purpose of
talking over football prospects
for next year with all "M" and
"A MA" men who have been in-
vited to attend a dinner to be
held at 6:30 o'clock Monday,
March 24, at the Michigan Un-
ion.
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chair-
man of the board in control,
and Philip G. Bartelme will also
speak at the dinner.

Reception To Mark Opening Of
New Community House Saturday

With a reception from 1 to
on Saturday, March 22, the n
munity House, on the corner
and William streets, will
doors to everyone in the c
county.
Only a few details have t
ranged before the 16 room
completely furnished and re
business. All the rooms a
furnished by fraternal and
organizations of the city and
On the first floor there are t
ing rooms which may be
meetings and rest rooms for
wish to use them. There is
kitchen and .a place for ru
TEXT BOO ILL RAI
LA1NSING DISCI

9 o'clock ple to eat lunches which they may
iew Com- bring. Two rooms are devoted to
of Main selling the clothes gathered by the
open its charity organizations of the city.
ity and The second floor has a club room
where clubs and groups may meet,
o be ar- two rooms for children who may be
house is detained in courts or who need shel-
ady for ter. The other rooms are furnished
re being for sleeping andimay be used by
women's transients in the city.
granges. The third floor is for girls exclu-
three liv- sively and it is hoped will be given
used for to those who wish to make their per-
any who manent home there. In this connec-
also a tion, the Y. W. C. A. will use the Com-
aral peo- munity House as an annex to their
quarters.
Active work as a civic center will
soon begin with classes for women
and addresses for all by interesting
IONSspeakers. The organizations compos-
J5 ing the Ann Arbor Federation of
Charities has been changed to the
____ Community Service and they will con-

1919 LITS SELECT
COMmMITTEEMEN
Men Prominent on Campus Are Ap-
pointed by Lundquist; Over 50
Are Chosen
THIRTEEN COMMITTEES WILL
ASSIST IN ADMINISTRATION
Laurel A. Lundquist, president of
the 1919 literary class, has appointed
the following committees to take
charge of the various functions of the
senior class:
Class day-larence L. Roeser,
chairman; Seymour B. Wilson; Jean
Maclennan; Martha Guernsey. Invi-
tation-Sherwald W. Sedgwick, chair-
man; Hazel Beckwith; Hope Fergu-
son; Ida Belle Guthe. Memorial -
Ada Arnold, chairman; Vera Andrus;
Clarence L. Roeser; Charles A. Tow-
ler.
Social--Ralph E. Gault, chairman;
H. C. L. Jackson; Charles S. Clark;
Archie D. McDonald; Mary Overman;
Doris McDonald;i Marcia Pinkerton.
Finance-J. Duncan Cameron, chair-
man; James H., Clarke, Jr.;- Roy E.
Stringer., Promenade - Charles F.
Boos, chairman; F. L. Froemke; Har-
old B. Coulter;- Charles W. Clark;
Thomas R. Adams; Gilbert Byrne.
Reception - James I. McClintock,
chairman; F. Cort Bell; John H.
Emery; Sarah Hall; Margaret Lippin-
cott. Banquet-Alfred Mason, chair-
man; James I. McClintock; Prescott
Smith; Emily Loman; Hellen Rams-
dell. Pipe and Cane-Ferdinand C.
Bell, chairman; J. Duncan Cameron;
John H. Emery.
Auditing - George H..Kretzschmar,
chairman; Herman A. August; Mor-
ris Paris. Cap and Gown - Chester
C. Morrison, chairman; Howard M.
Kay; John S. Kasberger; Kathrine
Kilpatrick; Marguerite Novy. Sou-
venir - James H. Clarke, Jr., chair-
man; Walter E. Ziegenbein; Ruth
Dailey; Margaret Atkinson. Swing
Out-Emery T. Jones, chairman; Ced-
ric C. Smith; Carl H. Wilmot.

I SSUE

RtEGARDING

VT Twv

UNIVERSITY

duct a maority of

their work in. this

'PROFESSORS NOT NEW,
SAYS WHITNEY
Prof. Allen S. Whitney, of the Edu-
cational department and chairman of
the Appointment committee, was in
Lansing last week when there was
considerable discussion on the pro-
posed bill which provides that a com-
mittee of University of Michigan fac-
ulty men shall prepare all text books
for grammar and primary schools in
the state.
"This is not the first time that such
a bill has been suggested at the leg-
islature," -said Professor Whitney,
"and it is a question as to whether
its reception will be better weir
corned."
In the event of the passage of the
bill the president of the University
will appoint the committee to see to
the selection of texts and another
committee will be named annually to
revise the stereotyped plates. Those
engaged in this work will be reim-
bursed by the state for their time.
'I do not believe," said Professor
Whitney, "that university faculty men
are the ones to determine the courses
in grammar schools. It would be a
difficult matter for the average col-
lege professor to write a second grade
text book."
Y psilanti Normal
Chorus Coming
Ypsilanti's Normal choir gowned in
medieval costumes will come to Ann
Arbor to sing a program of French,
Italian, and Russian songs,. and a
number of little masterpieces of ec-
clesiastical music at 8 o'clock Wed-
nesday evening in Ann Arbor high
school.
DAYLIGHT SAVING
PUTS TIME AHEAD
Students who have been finding the
o'clock class an almost impossible
feat are doomed to even greater trou-
ble. The Daylight Saving Bill will
again go into effect April 1 and the
much hated 8 o'clock will become still
nearer the cold gray dawn. The cam-
pus clock will be turned ahead one
hour.
One consolation alone remains, no
longer will it take two hours to reach
Detroit as the time basis will become
the same over the entire state. This
is accounted for by the fact that when
the clocks were moved back last fall
Detroit, Port Huron, Alpena and a few
other places in Michigan adopted
eastern time, which is one hour ahead
of central. It is now their plan'
to retain their present standard,
whichwill automatically equalize time
throughout the state.

building and have their headquarters
there.
WAR TAX TO BE PLCED
ON ALL 1-KOP- TICKETS
PROF. AIGLER DECIDES THAT
UNIVERSITY AFFAIR IS NOT
EXEMPTED
Payment of war tax is required on
all J-Hop tickets.I
After thorough investigation of the
matter, Prof. R. W. Aigler of the law
department has judged it necessary for
the Hop committee to collect a tax. He
has just returned from Washington,
where he investigated the question
of a tax on the opera, and at the
same time he secured information
which has helped him in this deci-
sion.

RED CROSS BONUS
HELP ROOM BUSY
More than 300 have applied at the
Red Cross Home Service rooms in
Nickels Arcade for blanks and assist-
ance in making them out for the $60
bonus due to discharged and released
service men.
During the last few days the local
office has been working to capacity
but -the ladies are anxious that every
man whom they can help come to the
office. Every one is welcome and
no charges are made.
A notary public is in the office ,at
all times to - make out duplicate
blanks which are to be kept as a proof
of service should the original be lost
in the mail.
Several men holding two discharges
have inquired at the rooms as to
whether they are entitled to two
amounts. This is not the case as the
first discharges were out of reserve
corps which were not in active serv-
ice.
There has also been some misun-
derstanding as to the dates of serv-
ice of the men entitled to the money.
Only men who have been discharged
since April 6, 1917, and those who had
enlisted before Nov. 11, 1919, are en-
titled to the gratuity.
NOTED SPEAKERS TO TALK
"AT SCIENTISTS METING
DISEASES OF MEN AND ANIMALS
SUBJECTS OF SCIENTISTS
LECTURES
Many notable scientists will speak
at the annual meeting of the Michigan
Academy of -Science which will be
held in the Medical bugding shortly
before spring vacation.
Dean Victor C. Vaughan will speak
on "Communicable Diseases in the
Camps," and Prof. William C. Iload,
professor of sanitary engineering, will
deliver a talk on "Army Sanitation."
Professor Giltner, professor of bac-
teriology at the Michigan Agricultural
college, will probably lecture on ani-
mnal diseases. Miss Zeo Northrup,
of the Agricultural college, will speak
also.
"The Alkaline Reserve," will be the
subject of a talk by Mr. William M.
German, assistant professor of phy-
siological chemistry.
VARSITY BAND TO LEAD
NEW LOAN PROCESSION

NEW CHAMBER 'Of
COMMERCE FOR'
SALARY' INCREASE

SHIRLEY SMITH TO
UNIVERSITt IN
CAPITAL

REPRESENT
STATE

Before the Hop committee sends out
the tickets, the war ta must be paid. D
This means that all the purchasersDo r a
of the admission slips will be requir- Americans Overfed
edto send in the extra sum of 50 N l0 S ffd
cents to W. G. Harbert at 604 South
State street by Friday. Checks should Are you an average American?
be made payable to David Nash. If you are you eat too much. So
For..some time because of the fact says Doctor G. A. May, in charge of
that the Union dances paid no tax, the physical development of every
the J-Hop committee labored under man in the University.
the impression that no tax would be, Doc May says that nearly every one
required. Upon receipt of wires from eats much more than is necessary
the other universities to the effect and that the variety of foods is much
that they had to pay the tax, active too large. "The ordinary menu con-
investigation was begun. tains too many fried dishes and high-
All independents who have not yet ly spiced foods," he continued.
petitioned for private booths may se- The highly spiced foods are ruled
cure booth tickets next week on pay- from the athletic training tables as
ment of the booth tax. Announce- they induce the men to overeat, which
ment as to time will be made later. is very hard on the stomach and has
As in former years the committee no practical food value. Fried foods
urgently requests that there be no are also taboed at the training tables
flowers. This is to abide by the tra- r as they are exceedingly hard to di-
ditions of former years and to reduce gest. Fried foods should not be or-

COMMITTEE APPOINTED
TO DRAFT RESOLUTIONS
Secretary Bonisteel Announces That
City Civic Organization Favors
Raise
"Ann Arbor's new Chamber of Com-
merce has taken every step possible
to aid in securing the appropriation
now needed to raise the salaries of the
members of the University faculty,
whose yearly income has been in-
sufficient to meet the high cost of liv-
ing," was the statement of Secretary
Roscoe O. Bonisteel yesterday.
At a meeting of the board of direc-
tors of the Chamber of Commerce
held yesterday a committee was ap-
pointed to draft resolutions to be pre-
sented to the State Ways and Means
committee in Lansing tonight. "The
resolutions that will be drawn up will
be of vital importance and interest to.
every citizen," was the opinion of Mr.
Bonisteel.
"This question, at the present time,
is one of the biggest prblems that
has yet been taken up by the new
Chamber of Commerce. The situation
has been studied thoroughly, and we
are heartily in favor of seeing a bill
passed in the state senate granting
this added appropriation to the pres-
ent allotment made to the: Univer-
sity."
Secretary Shirley Smith is going to
Lansing this morning in the int!rest
of this proposed appropriation from
the University side of the question.
SPEAKERS ASKED FOR,.
SENIOR MEDIC LURCH ,.
INVITATIONS CONTAIN LIST OF
CLASS OFFICERS AND
('OMMITTEES
Although it is not definitely known.
who will speak at the lunobeon to be
given at 12:30 Thursday noon for the
graduating medical class and it's
friends many prominent men have
been asked to respond to toasts, ac-
cordingsto Dean VictortC. Vaughan
who will act as toastmaster.
Among those who have been asked
are President Harry B. Hutchins and
Dr. John Dodson, who is to deliver the
address at the exercises which are
to be held in the afternoon.
Dr. C. B. Burr, of Flint, will also re-
spond to a toast. Dr. Burr is a spe--
ialist in nervous and mental diseases
and at the present time is medical di-
rectorof Oak Grove hospital for ner-
vous and mental diseases, Flint. He."
has been on extensive contributor to
magazines and is the author df the
"Handbook of Phychology and Mental
Diseases."
Regents Walter 11. Sawyer'and Jun-
ius E. Beal have also been asked. Dr.
G. Carl, Huber, professor of anatomy
and director of the anatomical labor-
atories, and Carl E. Badgley, '19M,
president of the senior class have also
been asked to respond to a' toast.
In the invitations which have been
sent out by the seniors is contained
a list of the committees and the class
officers wvo are: President, Carl E.
Badgley; vice-president, Clarence E.
Sherwood; secretary, Cecile Corley;
treasurer, Norman C. Bender. The
committees which are contained in
the invitations are: Honor-Frank
o. Novy, .Walter F. Bach, Egdar S.
Henry, R. W. Shelly, and Richard H.
Bennett; emnorial-Leonard F. Tha-.
ner, Margaret A. Miller, and C. A.'

Brown; Michiganensian- Horace W.
Porter, Casimir A. Domzalsjd, and
George R. Hageman; Commencement
-Theophile Rapheal, Herriman E.
Bozer, and J. M. 'Schmidt; picture-
Harold D. Barnard, Harry F. Becker;
social-John M. McKinney, E. D. Os-
borne, and Elmore F. Lewis; invita-
tion-Norman C. Bender, and Walter
F. Bach.

MICHIGAN SONGS AND,
TO FEATURE LARGE
MEETING ,

YELLSI

expenses.
GOVERNMENT INSURANCE EXAM
IS FREE AT HEALTH SERVICE
I
Several life insurance examinations
have been made by the Health Serv-
ice to restore government war poli-
cies which were allowed to lapse.
This examination is given free.

dered unless necessary to keep on
in the best condition, he continued.
Mr. May also says that one of our
worst habits is eating between meals.
This, too, tends to overload the stom-
ach and takes away this vital organ's
time for rest which is very necessary
for its proper functioning. He says
that eating after the evening meal is
(Continued on Page Six)

Singing Michigan songs and giving
Michigan yells, the Wolverine delega-
tion of 250 county chairmen from the
lower peninsula for the next Libefty
Loan drive will march into the Chi-
cago auditorium Friday headed by the
Varsity band.
At both the morning and after-
noon sessions of the meeting therband
in their Maize and Blue uniforms will
play old Michigan songs, many of
which will be familiar to the Michi-
gan representatives because of their
previous attendance at the Univer-
sity.
Leaflets with all the University
songs and yells will be distributed
among the county chairmen from
Michigan.
Bryn Mawr Scholarsbips to Graduates
Graduates of Michigan University
are entitled to compete for scholar-
ships to Bryn Mawr. These scholar-
ships are to be awarded in the cur-
rent year of 1919-1920, and are to the
Carola Woerishofer graduate depart-
ment of Social Economy and Research
at Byrn Mawr.

THE MATINEE MUSICALE PRESENTS
The Normal College Choir
Wednesday Evening-High School Auditorium, 8 p. m.
Tickets 25c at Wahr's State St. Store

.

The Oratorical Association presents'

Dr. Charkes T. Baylis

In His Lecture

"With the Dough-boys from Paris to the Rhine" 2ooo ft. of lvar-film
HILL TUDITO RIUM FRIDAY, NA RCH 21

8:00 P.

All.

Admission 35C

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