100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 15, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

V1 tita

:4Iaitui

ASwSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AiND NIGHT WI]
SERVICE

TODAY

i

No. 12.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1918.

PRICE THREE

I

11

I

I

A

A

S CLEAN UP LiON SALIENT;
MANS- ATTEMPT TO RESIST SWIFT
VA9NCE BY HURLING IN RESERVES

NTENTE ARMIES 'OUTFLANK
COURTRAI - GHENT
RAILROAD
RENCH TAKE 3,000 MEN;
BELGIANS GET BIG GUNS
muericans Meet with Stiff Resistance;
Gains Threaten Crumbling of
Lille Pocket
(By the Associated Press)
Peace talk prevades the air, but it
s falling on deaf ears as far as the
rmles in the field are concerned. In-
tead of a slackening in the fighting,
ew hostilities on a major scale are
eing carried out by the Allied armies
n Belgian Flanders.
They cleared out the old Laon sal-
ent and-made advances northward
t, Champagne, and aretnow menac-s
rig the; retirement of the Germans
astward toward their Valenciennes-
_ezieres-Metz line. General Foch has
rdered a drive in the Lys river re-
ion of Flanders toward Ghent which
ireatens to break the grip of the
1ermans in Belgium, entirely all the
Way from the frontier to the coast,
,nd likewise to eliminate the big bulge
n the line around Lille.
Allies Seize Roulers
Dispatches from headquarters ad-
nit that Roulers has been captured,
nd that Courtrai, the junction point
rom the railway leading to Ghent,
tas been outflanked. The French
roops alone are said to have taken
,000 prisoners, while the Belgians
ave captured several complete bat-
eries of guns and numerous prison
rs. Just how wide the new front of
ttack is, has not yet become appar-
nt. It is stated that the new advance
y the Allied troops is within range of
he enemy coast defenses, but that the
uns .opposite them have offered no
pposition.
To the south. the Germans are of-
ering stiff resistance to the British,
outhwest of Valenciennes and on the
olesmes sector, in an endeavor to
irevent the closing in of the Lille
aek, the capture of this important
own and Valenciennes.
Germans Lose St. Gobain Forest
At last reports the Germans are still
alling back from the region of Loan,
hat town and the entire St. Gobain
orest being in the hands of the
rrench. In Champagne the French
lave been able to make further cross-
s of the Aisne and to better mater-
ally their front eastward, notwith-
tanding the stubborn defense of the
nemy, who realizes that it is of the
reatest importance to, hold back the
French and the Americans striving
orthward, as a breach made in the
outhern line and a swift advance
vould imperil the entire German force
nside the sack from the Oise river
vest of Guise through St. Amand, east
Vf Lon.
Probably the greatest resistance of
11 is against the Amercians on both
ides of the Meuse river. Counter at-
acks are being delivered against the
nen from the United States, and the
ferceness of the assaults indicates
hat fresh forces are being brought
nto the fray to halt their efforts to
proceed up the river valleys, winding
heir way obliquely northeastward,
nstead of eastward toward the Ger-
una border. Constant use of artillery
s employed against the Americans at
arlous places. Gas shells are now
eing hurled by the enemy in his ef-
orts to hold the Americans in check.
All the counter attacks of the Ger-
nans thus far have been successful-

y witpstood by General Liggett's men,
nd the American artillery is answer-
mn the German front shot for shot.

8 4 0 MEN IN NEW
ARMY DETACHMENT
A contingent of 840 draftees will
arrive this morning and will be in-
ducted into section B of the S. A. T.
C. About half of them will be class-
ed as mechanics and the other half
as signal corps men. The men are
summoned here by order of Provost-
Marshal General Crowder.. The order
includes men from all over the state.
They will be quartered in Waterman
gymnasium and - will mess at the
Michigan Union. They will be placed
under the command of Lieutenant
Norvall.
Canvass Women 's
Houses For Loan
Canvassing ofdormitories and so-
rority houses has begun in the in-
terests of the Fourth Liberty Loan.
Mortarboard and Wyvern have un-
dertaken to reach those University
women who have not yet sub-
scribed.-
A committee of two girls, one from
each house, and one from either Mor-
tarboard -or Wyvern has been ap-
pointed to take care of that particu-
lar group. Up to last night the re-
turns were very small as the girls'
campaign began only yesterday and
they had as yet little opportunity to
reach their goals. In addition many
have already volunteered their con-
tributions some time during the past
two weeks.
Since Saturday the booth situated
on the campus has brought in only
$200. The booth will continue to be
open during the remainder of the
week. "In the canvass of the women
it is not intended to explain the need
for subscribing. Every patriotic man
or woman in the country should know
their plain duty," Marguerite Chapin,
'20, who is in charge of the campaign,
said yesterday.
The city and county subscriptions
are continuing to come in rather
slowly, but those in charge of the
campaign expect that the whole quo-
ta will be raised by Saturday.
No soliciting has been done as yet
but Mr. Ray Bassett, chairman of the
loan committee, said that if it is nec-
essary those who do not subscribe
will be personally solicited. If then
they fail to buy bonds their names
will be published. It was decided to
'give every one until next Saturday to
subscribe before publishing their
names as delinquents.
Many persons are coming to the
loan headquarters in response to let-
ters sent out last week. They all eith-
er invest in the bonds, promise to do
so by Saturday, or give a good ex-
cuse for not buying.
Chelsea and Whitmore Lake are the
only towns of the county which have
not subscribed their quota. Mr. -Bas-
sett said that if Ann Arbor fills its
quota the county will "go over the
top," as some of the towns have sub-
scribed more than enough to make up
what Chelsea )and Whitmore have
fallen behind.
The headquarters office on south
Main street will continue open for
subscriptions from 2 to 8 o'clock daily
the rest of the week.
Much Clothing Given for Belgians
The request for clothing for the
Belgian Relief has brought a generous
response. However, Mrs. G. W. Pat-
terson, who has charge of the contri
butions, while expressing her appre-
ciation, wishes to remind the public
that- all they can give will be put to
good use and that much more still is

needed.

Kaiser Must Cease Atrocities
And Evacuate Conquered Land
WASHINGTON, OCT. 14.-(BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.)-
PRESIDENT WILSON TODAY ANSWERED GERMANY'S PEACE OF-
FER WITH A NOTE DZCLARING ANEW THAT THERE CAN BE
NO PEACE BY A GERMAN GOVERNMENT CONTROLLED BY A
MILITARISTIC AND AUTOCRATIC CLASS, THAT THERE WILL BE
NO THOUGHT OF AN ARMISTICE WHILE GERMAN ATROCITIES
CONTINUE ON LAND.
WHEN THE TIME TO CONSIDER AN ARMISTICE COMES,_
THE PRESIDENT SAID, THE MILITARY ADVISERS OF THE UN-
ITED STATES AND THE ALLIES WILL BE CONSULTED, AND NO
MILITARY ADVANTAGE OF THE ARMIES FIGHTING THE CEN-
TRAL POWERS WILL BE LOST.

WILSON TELLS GERMAN TOE FORM
PRESENT POLICIES BEFORE DISCUSSIO O HITCO E

HOBBS CALLS WILSON-
PEACE TERMS GERMAN

VAN TYNE
. WOLF IN

SAYS G ERMANY
SHEEP'S CLOTH-
ING

is

The recent peace offers are being
heatedly discussed wherever men
gather, and some interesting opinions
are being advanced among faculty
men, some of whom are authorities on
international questions. Prof. W. H.
Hobbs, who is a strong advocate of
British domination of the seas, and an
opponent of disarmament and the
league of nations idea, is opposed to
conclusion of the war on President!
Wilson's 14 peace terms. He even goes
so far as to claim that they are Ger-
man terms, giving his reasons in de-
tail. His objections follow:
"Article 1 ignores the fact that Ger-
many began the war, for it aims to
stop both sides of the contest on the+
same plane.
America Opposed to Freedom of Sea
"Article 2 is a German term in that
it accepts Germany's plea for freedom
of the seas in both peace and war,
and opposes England and ourselves.
"Article 3 askes for international
free trade and is opposed to the policy
of this country and to the plans of
the Allies, and it is certain to drive a
wedge between them. After the war
Germany will need raw material.
This is in the hands of the Allies.
(Continued on Page Four)
JEWISH STUDENTS
WILL MEET SUNDAY
Menorah society and the Jewish
Students' congregation will give a so-
cial at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon in
Newberry all for the purpose of
bringing together all Jewish students
on the campus.
A pleasing program has been ar-
ranged which includes music, both
classical and "jazz," talks by prom-
inent speakers, and refreshments.
Rabbi Leo M. Franklin, of Detroit,
and Professor I. Leo Sharfman will
deliver addresses. Sergeant-Major Ed-
ward Fischer, of the S. A. T. C., will
speak on "The Student in Arms."
Miss Freda Bonan will give a talk
on "France." Miss Bonan is attend
ing the University as a representa-
tive of the French government and
will tell some interesting things
about conditions in her own country.
The social will be in charge of the
social committee, of which N. L. Salon
is chairman.
FIRE IN OLD HEADQUARTERS
IS EASILY EXTINGUISHED
Fire broke out in the old headquar-
ters of the first training detachment
at 10 o'clock last night. An over-
heated furnace was the cause. The
flue was old, and as a result two
holes were burned in the walls. The
building was well supplied with chem-
ical extinguishers, and the fire was
put out before much damage was
done. Old plaster and wall paper,
scattered around, were the worst
things the men had to contend with.

THREE MORE TRINIING
CORPS MEN DIE Of FLU
FEWER NEW CASES BUT MORE
PNEUMONIA NOW RE-
PORTED-
Three moresmembers of the S. A.
T. C. have succumbed to pneumonia
following attacks of Spanish influenza.
Ralph Blake Stollard of Pikeville,
Ky., Rodney F. Braun of Ann Arbor,
and William Voeple of Sebanawaign,
are the latest victims of the disease.
Mrs. George Brown and Martin Ryan
are Ann Arbor residents who have
died within the last 24 hours of in-
fluenza.
S. A. T. C. officers claim that there
are fewer new cases in the corps but
admit that many have developed pneu-
monia and that some are in a most
critical condition. Large numbers of'
men are being confined to quarters
pending decision as to whether they1
have influenza or simply bad colds.
The number of cases in the training
corps is estimated at approximately
the same number reported Saturday
night. Oxygen has been administeredy
to a few of the serious pneumonia
cases.1
The Homoeopathic hospital opened1
one of the floors in the floors in the1
new annex for influenza patients yes-
terday. There are now 48 cases at
this hospital and 81 at St. Joseph's
hospital: Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city
health officer, reported 33 new cases
yesterday among the civilian popula-
tion of the city.
The Chi Omega sorority was hard hit
by the influenza germ yesterday, when
three of its members came down with
it. Inasmuch as there was but one
resident reported, however, health of-
ficials thought it best to isolate her
on the sorority sleeping porch. The
other two cases have been confined
at the hospital.
INLANDER DOES NOT BELONG TO
GIRLS; 'WANTS CONTRIBUTORS
There is an idea prevalent on the
campus that the Inlander is a wom-'
an's magazine, but the fact is that any-
one who feels the creative thrill has
fulfilled the requirements, and may
contribute the product of his brain
to the magazine. There is a 'basket
especially for contributors, placed in
the rhetoric library. Manuscripts can
be mailed to the office of the publica-
tion .or given to any member of the
staff with perfect safety. Stories,
campus sketches, essays, !humorous
article, poems, all these come within
the scope of this magazine. The In-
lander is trying to meet a certain
need on the campus which the other
publications cannot fill. Not only is
every one asked to contribute but it
is urged that an interest in the maga-
zine itself be taken so that it shall
really represent the whole campus.
The war and the strenuous life of the
men this year has not eliminated them
from the staff. On the contrary there
are a number of S. A. T. C. men work-
ing on the Inlander.j

MEDICS DETAILED
TO CARE FOR SICK
With the permission of the sur-
geon-general of the United States
army, 20 senior medics will be de-
tailed from this University to assist
in caring for sufferers from the in-
fluenza epidemic. Ths step was de-
cided on at a faculty meeting last
evening in compliance with a request
from the surgeon-general of the pub-
lic health service for release of some
of the senior students for emrgency
service in the present epidemic. A
service in the present epdemci. A
committee from the faculty will se-
lect the men who will be called upon
to serve.
Various members of the senior med-
ic class have been rendering valua-
ble aid in caring for the influenza
victims in the barracks and frater-
nity houses in the city. Today 25 men
will go out under the command of
Captain Vaughan and care for mem-
bers of the S. A. T. C. who have con-
tracted or show symptoms of influ-
enza.
75 Men Leave for
T raining Camp
Merrily singing "Hail, hail, the
gang's all here and various popular
war songs, about 75 men from the S.
A. T. C. left yesterday morning for
the officers' training camp at Camp
MacArthur, Texas.
While in formation before Water-
man gymnasium, kit-bags by their
side, many could see their fathers and
mothers viewing them from a point
of vantage near the Natural Science
building and now and then the flut-
ter of a white handkerchief belied the
fact that the parents were not dry-
eyed.
The men had expected at first to
go to Camp Grant in Illinois, but a
late change of orders caused them to
be sent to Texas instead.
Those who were in the group are
listed as follows:
Abbey, L. D., Angell, Charles F.,
Armstrong, Wilber P, Armstjrong,
Ernest K., Ashbacker, Frank R., Aus~-
tin, Walter S., Briggs, James V.,
Blanchard, Roy B., Btler, Loren L.,
Boynton, Paul W., Bauman, Walter
L., Barron, Joseph E., Burkholder,
Paul W., Becker, Donald R., Culver,,
Donald C., Carter, Andrew A., Car-
nochan, Andrew A., Canon, William C.,
Cress, Elmer W., Dayhuff, Ernest A.,
Doetsch, James F., Decker, George E.,
Donahoe, William G., Davis, Edward G
P., Drewry, Acy J., Foster, Dudley
L., Fitzgerald, Thomas J., Huchin-
son, Perry P., Harmon, Valney C.,
Haigh, Richard 0., Heidelberg, Mel-
vin L. Herman, Herold, Hammer,
Ralph A., Hiss, Florian H., Harlan,
Ralph J., Ingham, Walter H., Jewell,
Wilson R., Jamisson, Howard R., Kir-
wan, Paul F., Lauri, Wilfred R., La
Rochelle, Loe R., Malcommson, Alex-
ander Y., Magrath, Earl K., Messner,
Daniel K., Maltby, David C., Miller,
Donald R., Miller, James S., Mitchel,
William H., Nichols, Herman- L.,
Palmer, Jonathan W., Palfreyman,
David H., Pflueger, Theodore S., Ran-
kin, Frank W., Raney, Le Roy D., Rutz,
Laurence M., Saxon, Russell H., Scott,
Ralph B., Stewart, John A., Stotter,
Herbert J., Scholnick, Ethan A., Se-
letto, George, Snydre, Edwin S., Van
Luven, Earl R.; West, Edward J.,
Warner, Luther H., Willson, George J.,
Weiss, Phillip, Williams, Russel S,,
Weitzenhoffer, Israel I, Zeder, James

C., Fisher, Albert E., Howley, John
R., Lips, John P., Link, Fay M., Rau,
John Max.

U. S. TO CONTINUE MONTH]
SHIPMENT OF 20,000
TROOPS
AUSTRIA TO RECEIVE
SEPARATE PEACE REPL
Peace Impossible Unless Teutons Of
Guarantees; Action to Start
German Revolt
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Oct4 14. - Presi,&e
Wilson has answered Germany's pe
proposals with a decision which n
only supports his diplomacy but a:
dispels the fears of those who p:
dicted that he would substitute v
tory at arms with defeat at diploma
No peace with kaiserism, autocr
must go. No armistice can either
thought of while Germany contini
her atrocities on land and sea. Pe
cannot be considered unless it
fully dictated by the Allied comma
ers in the field in such terms as e
solutely provide safeguards and gul
antees that Germany's part will I
be a scrap of paper.
This, in a few words, is the pr
ident's attitude.
May Cause Revolution?
If it does not bring a conside
tion, which may be more than,
unconditional surrender, Allied dip
mats and American officials beli
that there may be a revolution in G
many.
Beyond question it speaks for t
Entente Allies as well as for I
United States.
The dispatch of the president's :
ply was followed by the issue of
informal statement by the secreta
Secretary Issues Statement
"The government will continue
send over 206,000 with their suppl
every month and there will be no I
laxation of any kind."
Quite outside of the formal -phrag
of a diplomatic ocumftt it was Pr
ident Wilson's words to the world ti
he had no thought of stopping t
fighting at this stage.
The senate chambers rang with1
applause of the senators as the pre
dent's message was read a few m
utes after it had been . announced
The summary of the president's
ply follows:
Text of Wilson's Answer
"The unqualified acceptance by
present German government and
a large majority of the reichstag
the terms. laid down by the pr
dent of the United States of Amer
in his address to the congress of
United States on the eighth of 3
uary, 1918, and his subsequent
dresaes, justifies the president in m
ing a frank and direct statement
his decision with regard to the c
munications of the German gove
ment on the eighth and twelfth
October, 1918.
"He feels confident that he
safely assume that such also will
the decision of the Allied troops.
Hun Must Stop Illegal Actions
"The president also feels that I
also his duty to add that neither
government of th United States,
is he quite sure that the governm
with which the government of
United States is associated as a
ligerent, will consent to consider
armistice so long as the armed fo
of Germany continue in illegal
inhumane practices which they i
persist in.
"At the very time that the Geri
government approaches the gov4
ment of the United States with I
posals of peace, its submarines
engaged in sinking passenger p

(Continued on Page Six)

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan