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March 18, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-18

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d

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
COLDER.

.WwAlmrAw----

sfr 43fl

Pait

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRl]
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX No. 117.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1919.

PRICE THREE

4

CAMP EVENS MEN
FAVOR MILITARY
INFORMATION OBTAINED FROM
QUESTIONNAIRES OF'
1380 MEN
89 PERCENT BENEFITED
BY LIFE O F SOLDIERS
Suggestions Offered for Better Fitting
Uniforms; Existing Discipline
Strongly Supported
Paris, March 17. - The German
military and civil authorities in upper
Silisen, reports from Warsaw say, are
making active preparations to repel
.Polish and Czech plans in that part
of Silisea. The German volunteers are
well armed and are said to receive
good pay.

Goodyear Talks
On Architecture
"Restoration of the cathedrals de-
vastated by the Hun should not be un-
dertaken until a complete understand-
ing of the original plans of the build-
ers should be reached," stated Mr.
William 11. Goodyear in his lecture
on the study of columns of Gothic
churches in the war zone of France,
Monday afternoon in Alumni Mem-
orial ha1l
"This is necessary in order that the
grace and symmetry of these works
of art should not be destroyed," he
continued.P
Mr. Goodyear illustrated the three
different styles of horseshoe construc-
tion; the straight line section, the
vertical curvature section, and a com-
bination of the two.
WAR TAX PROBABLE
ON 1-HOP TICKETS

Plumber's Minimum Wage Exceeds
Maximum For Faculty Instructors
( T. F. 31.) Ithe rather prosaic case of the profes-
George Creel, chairman of the com- sor?

I

}

mittee on public information, said
that before we went into the war he
had always thought that the Ukraine
was some kind of a musical instru-
ment. And it's a fact you might havei
bought a Ukraine for a Ukelele, and
never have known the difference, ex-
cept for that Hawaiian tone.t
B. L. T. in the Line o' Type, in re-c
sponse to the query of President Wil-
son as to whether or not we sympath-f
ize with the aspirations of the Jugo-t
Slavs, the Czechs, and the Ruthenians,
answers that we probably do, but we

t _ ._ ._ t _

Did you know that the minimum
wages of a plumber, or a carpenter,
or such a workman in the city of De-
troit, for instance, were greater than
the maximum wages of an instructor
in the University of Michigan?
Did you know that in the last 11
years, with strained, abnormal condi-
tions before the war, and the great in-
crease of the cost of living during the
war, the professor has not received a
raise in salary; that nine-tenths of
them can't exist on th:e. money the
state pays them, and have to do out-
side work continually? And that pro-

are just beginning to distinguish them portionally to the cost of living, fac-
from the wild flowers. ulty men are receiving just about
It's great to go into a quandry half of what they made, more than ten
about these vague problems. And aft- years ago?
er fighting and winning a war for jus- So when you start in again to argue
tice, it's one's duty to help decide whether Arabia should have a king
such questions. But while you're rest- or a president, or discuss the effects
ing up between quarters in your of the bean crop in Dalmatia upon the
weighty considerations of making the liberty of the Albanian chiefs-why if
world fit to live in, could you be a it's justice you are looking for-con-
little less romantic, and reflect upon sider the professor. That's all.

ILAW

(By Associated Press)

FACULTY INyESTIGATES
REVENUE LAW ON THE
SUBJECT

Washington, March 17. - Over-
whelming endorsement of a universal
military training system, coupled with
equally strong support for the exist-
ing disciplinary relationship between
officers and men of the army, was ex-
pressed today by a representative
group of the selective service draft
of the 12th division of Camp Devens,
Massachusetts.
Representative on War
The opinion" of the men number-
Ing 1,380 with an average length of
service of more than 10 months, were
obtained through a carefully arranged
questionnaire with every safeguard,
provided to insure absolutely free ex-
pression of opinion and with gen-
eral distribution of the division so as
to make the answers representative.
The report in the inquiry was made
public today at the War Department.
Half Dissatisfied
Although half of the men question-
ed were dissatisfied with military life
the report shows that 89.5 per cent of
the replies expressed the soldier's be-
lief that he personally had benefitted
by his army life; 79 per cent were
glad of their training aside from feel-
ings of patriotism, and 88 per cent
favored universal military training as
a national policy. A substantial ma-
jority agreed that the existing rela-
tionship between office% and men was
necessary and disapproved the social
mixing of the rank and file.
Improvements Wanted
The largest numbers of suggestions
as to improvements in the service.
had to do with better -fitting uniforms
or changes in mess arrangements.
Of universal military training the
answers were' emphatic. Of 1,380 re-
plies turned In 1,213 were flatly in
favor. Good citizenship, physical ben-
efits, and character building were the
chief reasons of approval assigned.
Six Months' Training
The largest number of men making
recommendation as to the form of
service urged six months as a suffi-
cient. period and thought it should be
given to men during their 18th year.
46 TAKE RITUAL
OF COSMOPOLITANS
Forty-six new members, 38 men
and 8 women, were initiated into the
Cosmopolitan club following the re-
ception held Saturday evening at
Martha Cook residence.
The program, which was furnished
by members of the club, was opened
with the singing of the Latin hymn,
"Gaudeamus Igitur" The reading of
the ritual followed, with presentation
of pins by Presidents Sotokichi Kat-
suizumi, grad., of the men's chapter,
and Louisa B. Youngs, '21, of the
women's chapter.
The balance of the entertainment
consisted of a vocal solo by Mrs. H.
M. Dyason, Sch. of M., a recitation by
Miss Youngs, mandolin solo by A. M.
Elkind, '20, explanation of jiu-jitsu by
Bunzaburo Sashida, and vocal solos
by Wiltrud Hildner, '19, and Armin
Friedman, '20.
A feature of the evening was the
singing , of the Cosmopolitan song,
composed by Prof. 3. A. C. Hildner,
advisor of the club, and sung by Miss
Hildner, accompanied by K. F. Rindel-

Members of the law faculty are in-
vestigating the revenue law to learn
if .a war tax should be collected on
J-Hop tickets.
By telegraphing other universities
the Hop committee has learned that
a tax was required on dances at these
institutions. It is possible that this
will not hold true at Michigan, for
the hop may not be of a similar na-
ture.
At such affairs as the Union dances
and the Union opera it has not been
necessary to collect a war tax be-
cause of their connection with lt he
'University. Karl Velde, chairman of
the Hop committee, said, "Thehboard
of control of students affairs has as
much control of this dance as of Union
matters, which may-mean that we will
not have to collect a war tax."
The tax, if levied, will amount to 50
cents, and will be collected when the
formal invitations are mailed.
Apmplications for tickets will be re-
ceived by W. G. Harbert at 604 South
State street up to Thursday noon.
Checks should be made payable to
David Nash.
ON EDUCATIONAL- FILMS

PROTESTS LODGED
A-4GA9IN5TLOW PAY
Study of Local Conditions Shows
Inadequacy of Professors'
Salaries
LEGISLATURE EXPECTED TO
MAKE FIT READJUSTMENTS
Since the acceptance by the Board
of Regents of a memorial from faculty
members of the University, regarding
professors' salaries, an energetic came
paign is being carried on by the news-
papers and certain officials of the
state to bring the situation before
the state legislature for prompt in-
vestigation and action.
Not only have those connected with
the disposal of University affairs tak-
en the matter into consideration, but
campus clubs and honorary societies
are beginning to advocate the cause
of the faculty men, and to ask for im-
mediate adjustment of the ridiculous
and unfair conditions.
Michigan Low on Salary List
As far back as 1908, in the report
to the Carnegie foundation, it was
found that among the 27 largest uni-
versities in the United States, Michi-
gan ranked 20th in the average sala-
ries paid to professors; and 19th in
the salaries to assistant professors.
Nineteen hundred and eight was the
last time the foundation report was
made, and present statistics are not
available.
Professors Not Considered
In 1908, instructors of the faculty
in university classes received a mini-
mum of $900 a year. Eleven years aft-t
er, in 1919, the minimum salary of an
instructor is $1,000 a year. Thus it is
seen that in the very abnormal con-
ditions brought about by the war, and
the high cost of living, before the war,
(Continued on Page Six)

HUGE FUND ASKED
FOR CONSTRUCTION
Board of Regents Seeks Million and a
Half from Legislature for
Buildings
NEW UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL
AMONG PROJECTS PLANNED
With a request to the legislature for
appropriations of $1,500,000 for the
coming year, the Board of Regents has
authorized the publication of a pamph-
let addressed to the voters of Michi-
gan and the legislature for 1919.
Deficiency in Current Expense
After enumerating the different ex-
penses of construction which include
the completion, furnishing and equip-
ping of the library, the building of a
hospital, and the construction of a
model high school, the bulletin in-
cludes an item of $300,000 to meet the
deficiency in current expenses due to
the abnormal war conditions for the
year ending Dec. 31, 1918.
Increased cost of everything which
the University must purchase has
caused this deficit. Not only have
building materials soared to incred-
ible prices, but the exceptional up-
ward trend in the cost of living, has
resulted in the necessity of paying
higher wages for all the different
kinds of labor involved in building
and construction work.
Legislators Overlook Changes
Merely for the past year, appro-
priations for $300,000 must .be made to
pay the expenses of the previous
terms, or, before the end of the pres-
ent year, the University will be with-
out funds for running expenses. The
fact that the unusual conditions
due to the war, which have seriously
affected every concern and individual
in the country, have not been taken
into consideration by the legislators,
(Continued on Page Six)

Fresh Engineers
To Hold Smoker
Smokes, a program, and refresh-
ments are the big attractions of the
fresh engineer smoker to be held at
7:30 o'clock, Tuesday evening, in the
Michigan Union building.
More than 200 tickets had been sold
up to Monday noon, and those in
charge are confident that the entire
engineering class of '22 will be pre-
sent.
Dean W. H. Butts, Prof. W. C. Hoad,;
and Prof. L. M. Gram, all of the col-
lege of engineering, have been secured
to speak on this occasion Featuring
the program will be a jazz orchestra
of 12 pieces, and a number of songs
rendered by several members of the
class.
ORATOhICAL FINALS SET
FOR MONDAY, MARCH 4;
WOMEN TO PLAY PROMINENT
PART IN NORTHERN LEAGUE
CONTEST
That Monday evening, March 24, will
be the date of the University finals
for the Northern Oratorical league
contest, was the decision of the Ora-
torical board at a meeting held Mon-
day afternoon. Regent Junius E. Beal
will preside.
Women are to be prominent in the
league contest according to informa-
tion given out Monday. Northwestern
university has already selected a wom-
an as its' representative, and Alice
Hoelzle, '19, is the one woman among
five entrants in the University finals.
This is the third year that North-
western university has chosen a wom-
n contestant. In the two previous
years its representatives were wom-
en, and each time they have been win-
ners of the contests.
Alice Hoelzle is the third woman
in the history of the University to
enter the league finals. In 1906 Fran-
ces Hickcock represented Michigan in
the big contest, and in 1917 and 1918
Lois May, '18, was defeated in the
finals.
There will be at least one woman
among the judges of the University
contest. From five to seven members
of the faculty will compose this body.
In addition to Northwestern univer-
sity, the University of Illinois and
Oberlin college have selected their
final contestants. The University of
Iowa will choose its contestant on
Friday. The Universities of Wisconsin
and Minnesota will be the last to pick
their representatives.
1919- MEICAL CLASS
GRATSTHURSDAY
LUNCHEON IN BARBOUR GYMNA.
SIUM TO PRECEDE
EXERCISES
"The Intern Year" will be the sub-
ject on which Prof. John M. Dodson,
dean of Rush medical college, will
spak at the 1919 medical commence-

MAX LICHNOWSKY
MAY BE GERMANY' u fmgso

PRINCE

BLAMED PRUSSIA

STARTING WORLD WAR; UP.
HELD ENGLAND
SIBERIANS SEIZE C I T
OF UFA FROM BOLSHEV]
'German Empire to Be Rehabiltal
afore Rapidly Than People Thnk
Says Kuehman
(By Associated Press)
Stockholm, March 17. - The Ber
cofrespondent of the Svenska-Di
bladet mentions Princes Charles XJ
Lichnowsky, former German amb
sador to Great Britain, as the pr
able ambassador to the United Sta
after peace has been concluded.
Prince Lichnowsky created a s
sation in 1918 when in a long arti
he blamed Germany for having sta
ed the world war and asserted t:
Great Britain did everything possi
to avert hostilities. As a result
this the Prussian house of lords
pelted him from that body. Re4cen
it was reported that Prince Iichn
sky would head the German dele
tion to the peace conference.
Bolshevik Advance Dangerous
Warsaw, March 16.-The Bolshe
advance into Ukraine is assuming f
ious proportions, a cording to advi
from Stanislau. The objective of I
shevik apparently is the old froni
line of Russia on the west .with
probable diversion toward Odessa,
General Petlvia's government is
tiring from Winnitza to Poskurow,
the battle for the possession of W
nitza is continuing unabated.
Siberians Occupy Ufa
New York, March 17.-The Siberi
after strong attacks' on the Bolshe
occupied the city of Ufa, March 13,
cording to information received
day by the Russian information b1
eau from Omsk.
The retreating Bolshevik troops
in danger of being surrounded,
the dispatch, which adds -that
Siberian army has taken a la
amount of booty. The people of i
which had been in Bolshevik ha:
since Jan. 20, were found to be i
deplorable condition, it was state
"Germans in Paris in 1925"
Paris, March 17.-The German
,pire will be rehabilitated more ra
ly than most people think, Dr. R
ard von Kuehlmann, fomer Germ
foreign minister, declared in a le1
quoted by the Echo de Paris. Accc
ing to the letter von Kuehlmann s
that the former ruling classes of C
many are still hopeful of returning
power.
The letter says that events
moving as the writer anticipated e
ier in the year. when he wrote I
Marshall Foch had seized his, sw
and it would not be necessary
Germany longer to fear France.
der favorable conditions von Ku
mann was quoted as saying, "'
Germans will be in Paris before 19
WORK OF MUSICAL
CLUB COMMENC
Preliminary organization of
Mandolin club was completed M
day night at the first rehearsal h
by the club.
The list of men chosen for the (
club has been sent to the eligib:
committee for approval and the :
sonnel of the club will be annou
in a few days.
It is still possible for first tel
and guitar players to tryout for
clubs. Those wishing to work on

business staff should see Charles
Osius, Jr., '20, at 2 o'clock Tues
afternoon at the Michiganensian
fices, Press building. Tryouts for
musical part of the club may also s
up at this time.
'19 Engineers to Hold Class Din
Senior engineers will hold a c
dinner on Friday, March 21, at
Michigan Union. This event marks
yeturn to the old custom of hold
class dinners. - Tickets may be
tamed at the special class meetin
be held Wednesday afternoon.

BELIEVES MOVIES ARE BIG
IN TEACHING OF
MEDI)1CIN E

AID

"While I do not believe the mo-
tion picture will ever replace the pres-
ent methods of instruction I have every
reason to think that it will become
a powerful aid in the near future,"
stated Col. William O. Owen in con-
nection with his exhibit of education-
al films Monday night in the Natural
Science auditorium.
In discussing the various types of
educational films the lecturer showed
the animated diagram to be the most
practical. By this method he demon-
strated in detail several surgical ope-
rations.
He will deliver another lecture at
7:30 Tuesday night in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium. Colonel Owen comes
to Ann Arbor as a representative of
the commission of education.
GIRLS TO PRODUCE
ALLEGORICAL PLAY
This year's Junior- Girls' play will
differ from any ever produced.
It is an allegorical satire with many
incidental musical parts. There will
be no single star role, but eight or
ten equally prominent parts, conse-
quently a larger number of players
than usual will be given.an opportun-
ity to distinguish themselves.
The second act is now being prac-
ticed. Some of the rehearsals are be-
rng held in the Majestic theater.
Tickets will go on sale Wednesday
at the booth in University hall.
Cerele Yrancals to Hear McLaughlin
"Caen Ville d'Art de la Parmandie"
will be the subject of an illustrated
lecture by Prof. W. A. McLaughlin
at 4:15 o'clock Wednesday afternoon.
in room 203, Tappan -hall, under the
auspices of the Cercle Francais.

BRICKS OR BRAINS?
(Reprint from The Daily.)
If it is true that less than ten per cent of the professors in the Univer-
sity are able to live on their salaries, then there is something radically
wrong at Michigan.
In the last few years we have put up a number of new buildings on the
campus. This is a good sign. We should have adequate facilities. But
we should remember that we must also have the men to preside in these
buildings.
Many of our best faculty men have left simply because they could com-
mand more money elsewhere. What is the good of fine buildings if we have
not the big men? A university is noted because of its faculty. Are we
building a university of bricks?
Michigan has been unfortunate in not having endowments. Other un-
iversities, through the generosity of wealthy men, are able to erect beaut-
iful buildings and pay adequate salaries. Not being endowed, except for
a few isolated cases, we must make the state appropriation put up ourj
buildings and also pay our salaries. Consequently, the latter suffer.
If the appropriations of the state were larger, larger salaries could be
paid. To make the state grant larger appropriations, the taxpayers should
be brought to realize the importancee of the University, and be made to
take more pride in it. At present, the University is viewed as a sort of
necessary burden.
The University should be placed in a different light before the taxpay-
ers. They should be made to see that higher education is not a fad, but a
vital, all-absorbing thing.
We want new buildings-we need them. But we also want salaries that
will enable a fair sort of living. A university of bricks is pretty to look
at. But a university of brains is the one that will command attention and
respect -

ment at 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon
in Sara Caswell Angell hall.
The ceremony will be opened by a
prayer by the Rev. Sidney S. Robins,
new pastor of the Unitarian church.
This will be followed by a solo by
Robert R. Dieterle, '21M. He will be
accompanied by Earl V. Moore.
After the address by Dr. Dodson, de-
grees will be conferred by President
Harry B. Hutchins. The singing of
"America" will close the exercises.
"Although the graduation is for the
senior medical class and its friends,
others will be admitted if seats re-
main," said Prof. W. P. Lombard who
is in charge of the arrangements.
A luncheon will be held at 12;30
o'clock in Barbour gymnasium, tick-
ets for which are now on sale at the
medical school office. Invitations have
been sent to the deans of all depart-
ments. Dean Victor C. Vaughan will
act as toastmaster.
Invitations in the form of a small
booklet covered with grey embossed
leather have been sent out by the
class. These contain a 1st of the fac-
ulty, the class officers, the commit-
tees, and the class role, and include
a cut of the medical building.

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