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March 15, 1919 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MARCH 15

s

CHURCHES COMBINE FOR
ANNUAL UNIU SUERICE
RABBI NATHAN KRASS OF NEW
YORK WILL OFFICIATE
SUNDAY
With virtually all of the Protestant
churches of Ann Arbor co-operating,
the Union service in Hill auditorium
this Sunday is expected to draw a rec-
ord attendance. Evening church
meetings have nearly all been called
off so that a maximum number may
attend the Union service.
Rabbi Nathan Krass, who will of-
ficiate, is known as a leader in the
social and religious life of New York
Come On Dad
Watch for Date of Ticket Sale

city. He is an accomplished speak-
er, as well as an earnest thinker on
the newer social problems of the
day. Rabbi Krass toured the coun-
try recently in behalf of the Red Cross
and of the Liberty Bond campaigns.
A special musical programT by the
choir of the Temple Beth-El, Detroit,
will be rendered during the serice.
Included in this choir, is William
Howland, formerly head of the vocal
department of the University School
of Music.
Sunday will mark the sixth anni-
versary of the initiation of the Union
serices by the federation of Christian
churches of Ann Arbor, in conjunction
with the Jewish Students' Congrega-
tion.
ARtY .TABLES GET TRANSFER
TO SUMMER PICNIC SERVICE
Tables which were used in the S.
A. T. C. mess hall have been pur-
chased by Superintendent of Parks'
Ray Bassett to be used as picnic
tables in the parks next summer.

i

Students of the University of Michigan tare cordially invited to
inspect our new litre of

Winter Suits
and
Overcoats

Newest materials, newest models, newest
lowest prices

colorings,

any

7~~;w~bkO~4aaq

\V
New Spring
~Styles
For the Young Men
Very smart, very correct,
are these Sack Suits for
Young Men. Cut closely
to the figure with the
waistline sharply defined,
many of them waist-seams.
Tailored by the
KIRSCHBAUMR SHPS
in lustrous
! ~All-Wool Fabrics
$32-$35- $37.50
FredW
Gross
309 So. Main
2 WaI-

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ra.r. rwta a au.

RED CROSS SWAMPED
BY BONUSAPPLIUNTS
COUNI'TY CLERK NOW PREPARED
TO REGISTER DISCHARGES
AND RECORDS
Flooded with applications on the
part of discharged service men for the
$60 war bonus that the government is
to give to them, the Red Cross head-
quarters in the Arcade announced
yesterday that they are being kept
busy most of the day. A similar re-
port was turned in from the offices
of the city and county clerks, who
announced that they are giving out
the application blanks at the rate of
hundreds a day.
The county clerk is now prepared
to register discharges, he announced.
Friday.sAs a measure ofhsafety, most
men who have been discharged, are
registering their records to insure
them against any possible loss. It is,
necessary, the clerk added, for the
men to bring their papers with them,
otherwise they cannot be properly
registered
The local office of the Red Cross has
engaged a notary for the purpose of
making duplicate discharge papers for
men who desire them.
UNIVERSITY BILLS
AWAIT LEGISLATURE
(Continued from Page One)
was asked, but at the same time the
Regents knew that it would have to
be supplemented by at least $200,000,
if they were to provide for present
and future library needs. The savings
from the mill tax that go into the
building fund of the University, they
estimated would provide the extra
amount needed.
But due to the war conditions, re-
sulting in a large decrease in the
amounts received from student fees
and in more than doubling the price
of substantially everything that the
University has had to buy during the
last two years, the Regents have been
unable to save'anything from the mill
tax.
Hospitals Inadequate
The enlargement of the old, and the
construction of new University hospi-
tals during the last two years have
been delayed by the government re-
strictions upon building. Under pres-
ent conditions the University hospi-
tals are inadequate. Conditions result-
ing from the large increase In the
number of patients and in the conse-
quent'burdens imposed, are serious in
the extreme. The risks from fire and
unsanitary conditions are great and
continuous and can only be remedied
by the erection of a fireproof, sani-
tary, and up-to-date structure.
Appropriations Necessary
Appropriations of $300,000 to meet a
deficiency in the current expenses for
the year ending Dec. 31, 1918, must be
made or the University, before the
end of the present year, will be with-
out funds for running expenses. The
University cannot legally borrow mon-
ey. The reduced income from student
fees and the increased cost in every-
thing that the University must pur-
chase have caused this deficit.
Income Increase Required
Without an increase in the mill tax
from three-eighths to one-half, it will
be impossible for the Regents to put
the salaries of the instructing force
upon a living basis. A recent com-
munication to the Regents upon this
subject, shows that the condition de-
mands immediate relief. There must
also be a substantial increase in the

income of the University, if the Re-
gents are to avoid future deficits and
to meet the growing needs of the in-
stitution.
POSTAL AUTHORITIES PREDICT
RETURN OF TWO CENT STAMP
Temporary Three Cent Victory Issue
to Be Discontinued; July 1 Ends.
Present Postage Rate

TODAY
2:30-Meeting of the Bayonne N. I.
club at 321 S. Division. Plans for
the semester will be discussed.
7 :00-Craftsmeien club meeting at the
Masonic temple. Work in M. M. de-
gree. All Master Masons invited.
7:00-Movie at the )Iethddist church.
MAarguerite Clark in "Snow White."
7:30-Meeting of the Upper Room
Bible class at 444 S. State.
7:30 - Reception for Cosmopolitan
club at Martha Cook building.
8:00--"Y" Imovie at Lane hall. Car-
lyle Blackwell in "Good for Noth-
ing."
S:06-Pre"byterian social at the cor-
Der of Division and Huron.
TOMORROW
12:00--L. A. Lundquist, '19. would like

I

Will Insure Your Portrait for
Complete Satisfaction

Call 948-W

619 E. Liberty

U .

f,

to meet the presidents of the var-
ious senior classes in the old Un-
ion building.
3 :00socIa o Miciga Mci-
orah society in red room at Lane
hall.
4:1i-Dr. William H. Goodyear will
lecture at Alumni Memorial hall.
PROF, W. 0, HENBERSON
WILL LECTURE TONIGHT

!.

Golf Suits

RidingIlireeehes

D. E. GRENNAN

Custom Tailor

Original Designs

WHATS GOING ON

Now Open for Business

UPPER ROOM BIBLE CLASS
HEAR POPULAR CAMPUS
SPEAKER

TO

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on Saturday evening, March 15. Spe- insure everyone a good time. Danc-
cial music will be furnished by some ing 830 to 11:30. Tickets on sale at
of "Ike" Fisher's best men, which will the Busy Bee at $1 per couple.-Adv

l

An Appointment With The

jDI.

EDs V, PRICE & CO,
Tailored-to-order
Clothes

Prof. W. D. Henderson will be the
principal speaker in a miscellaneous
program at the anniversary exercises
of the Upper Room Bible class at 7
o'clock Saturday evening.
Starting with 36 members five years
ago, the class now has an enrollment
of 350. More than 1,000 regular mem-
bers have been enrolled since its be-
ginning.
"Father" Iden endeavors to keep in
touch at least once a year with every
man who has at some time been a
member of the Upper Room Bible
class. More than 5,000 letters are sent
to these old members the first of every
year, and consequently many letters
are received from them in return.
Plans for the flew Bible Chair build-
ing have been completed for some
time, but construction will not be un-
dertaken until prices of labor and ma-
terial are more settled. The whole
upper floor of the new building will be
given over to the Upper Room Bible
class. Dr. Iden's office and a large
reading room, together with a few
class rooms, will occupy the ground
floor. The building will resemble Lane
hall somewhat, although the plans
were drawn up prior to those of the
University Y. M. C. A.
COLLEGE CLUB PICKS THREE
PLAYS FOR DETROIT PROGRAM
Three, light, one-act plays will be
the program for the presentation to
be given by the College club on March
29, at the Arts and Crafts playhouse
at 25 Watson street, Detroit.
The playlets will be "Catherine
Parr," a burlesque on the wives of
Henry VIII, "Hop 0' My Thumb," the
success of Maude Adams, and a "Like-
ly Story" by Lawrence Houseman.
This club is composed of 300 mem-
bers who have at least one year of
credit in some college oi university,
and there is some excellent dramatic
material in the organization. Many
of the members are former students
of the University.
The program will be given on the
afternoon and evening of March 29
and the admission will be $1.10 includ-
ing war tax.
ERROR CORRECTED

14 Nickels Arcade
Fifth Anniversary fteeting' of the
.Upper Room Blible Class
Saturday Evening, March 15
From 7 to 8 o 'clock
SPECIAL PROGRAM
DR. WILLI!?71 D. HENDERSON
of the Unibersity lill speak
ALL UNIVERSITY IEN CORDIALLY INVITED
444 South State Street
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THE UNIVERSITY

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OF MICHIGAN

CAMPUS

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Where You Touch Elbows with
All the World

Through an error in The Daily for
Friday the transactions of the com-
mittee on student affairs were wrong-
ly accredited to the Student council.
The committee on student affairs is
composed entirely of members of the
faculty.

Copyright 1919 Hart Schaffner & Mars

- -

I

i

The two cent stamp is coming back.
It has been officially announced by
the postal authorities that on July 1
the three cent charge on letters will
be discontinued and the former charge
of two cents substituted in its place.
A three cent Victory stamp, repre-
senting the figure of Justice, sur-
rounded by the flags of the Allies, is
now being issued at about 500 of the
first class postoffices. This issue, how-

r
L
1
i
9
t
- t

:.

FOXTROT PROVES POPULAR
The general opinion of the people
this year seems to be that the' foxtrot
is much more popular than any other
dance. Upon this theory the Overseas
Club is giving a Foxtrot Ball at the
Masonic Temple, Ypsilanti, Michigan,

Stylish Spring Garments
Ready for you at the largest Men's Clothing Store in the County.
Hart, Schaffner & Marx Suits and Overcoats
are made of best materials by expert workmen in the latest and best styles.
REULE, CONLIN, FIEGEL CO.

For detailed information address the Dean of that
School or College of the University in which you
are specially interested, or the Secretary of the
University, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

.

M"l

ever, is only temporary and
discontinued July 1.
For service and results try
Want Ad.-Adv.

will be
a Daily

Come On Dad
Watch for Date of Ticket Sale

Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes

Southwest Corner Main and Washington Sis.

Ann Arbor

I

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a

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J

|VAN'S LUNCH CHATS For Quality and Service

1116 So.. University Ave.-

I

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