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March 15, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-15

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THE WEATHER T
RAIN OR SNOW
TODAY

Ap

~Iaitj,

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND IIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 115. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 15, 1919. PRICE THREE CEI

UNIVERSITY ILLSI
AWAIT LEISLATION
AT STATE CAITO
ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS
TO COVER EXTRA WAR
EXPENSES
AMENDMENT WANTED
OF PRESENT TAX LAW
Regents Publish Bulletin Outlining
Deficiencies and Needs of
Institution
Four bills, asking for special appro-
priations amounting to $1,500,000 for
additions to the University of Michi-
gan and for extra expenditures incur-
red by the war conditions, are now
before the state legislature at Lan-
sing. 6. fifth bill asks for an amend-
ment of the mill-tax law by substitut-
ing one-half of a mill for three-
eighths.
Board Makes Requests
In a bulletin of information just
published by the Regents and address-
ed to the people of Michigan ands the
legislature of 1919, the Board makes
the following requests:
For the building and equipping of
a model high school for the depart-
ment of education of the University,
to be used for the practical training
of high school teachers, an appro-
priation of $300,000.
For the completion of the construe.
tion of the University library build-
,ing and for equipping and furnish-
ing the same, an appropriation of
$200,000.
For the construction, equipping,
and furnishing of an addition to the
University hospital, an appropriation
of $700,000.
To meet a deficiency in the current
expenses of the University, due to the
war conditions, for the year ending
Dec. 31, 1918, an appropriation . of
$300,000.
An amendment of the mill-tax lav
by substituting one-half of a mill for
the present three-eighths.
The foregoing reuests are made
after a careful and thorough study of
the entire situation by the Regents
who are familiar with the needs of
the University. They ask only for
what is, in their opinion, immediately
and absolutely necessary, states the
bulleti'n, which goes on to say in part:
Teacher-TraIning Needed
No first' class high school in the
state or country will as a rue take
a University of Michigan graduate as
a teacher until that graduate has not
only learned his subject but has also
learned to teach it either by actual
practice in schools or at a university
school of education devoted to this
purpose. There is no such teacher-
training high school in this state.
Not Like Normal School
The authorities of the normal school
system are a unit in favor of the es-
tablishment of such a school at the
University, and have gone on record
to the effect that the project is in no
sense a duplication of the normal
school work. The need for this school
which in no way will deduct from the
good work being done by the state
normal school has been endorsed by
practically every sort of organized ed-
ucational body in the state.
Mill Tax Savings Valueless
In 1915, the legislature appropriated
$350,000 for the construction of a
new library building. This amount

(Continued on Page Six)
NO PEACE WITHOUT AMERICA
New York, March 14.- Wil-
liam G. McAdoo, former secre-
tary of the treasury and director
general of railroads declared in
a statement to newspaper menj
here today that he was strongly
in favor of a League of Nations
and believed that provision
should be made for it in the
treaty for peace.
"The world has already been or-
ganized for war, and we have
had wars. The world must now
organize for peace, in order that
we may have peace. Without
America there can be no effec-
tive league that will secure
peace," said Mr. McAdoo.

TO STUDENTS GET
BARBOUR AWARDS
Scholarships amounting to $5,000
were apportioned among 10 foreign
students by the committee in charge
of the Barbour scholarships for Orien-
tal women at a meeting held Thurs-
day evening in President Harry B.
Hutchins' office.
The following students to whom
scholarships have already been given
were reappointed for the year 1919-
20: Ah Lan Giang, '21, Nanking,
China; Helen L. Wong, '22, Shang-
hai, China; Yaiko Katsuizumi, Kaga,
Japan; Yuki Matsumoto, Japan; Ka-
mayo Sadakata, '19, Tokyo, Japan.
The new appointees for the year 1919-
20 are: Lydia B. Vu, Berea, 0; Liu
Sien-tsin, Nanking, China; Dong Me
Tsung, Shanghai, China; Sugi Mibai,
Oakland, Calif.; and Kita Fukui, Yo-
kohama, Japan. .
Each of the above named will re-
ceive $500 in a lump sum. The money
is the interest accrued from the $100,-
000 fund given by Levi L. Barbour, of
Detroit, for scholarships for Oriental
women. The committee having charge
of the fund and of the appointing
power is composed of President Har-
ry B. Hutchins, Dean John R. Effin-
ger, Dean V. C. Vaughan, and Dean
Myra B. Jordan
YARSITY BAND PICKED
TO PLAY T CICG O
"TiE VICTORS" TO SOUND OUT
AT OPENING OF LIBERTY
LOAN DRIVE.'
Heading a delegation of 60 county
chairmen from Michigan for the next
Liberty loan drive, the Michigan Var-
sity band will march into the Chicago
auditorium Friday and Saturday,
March 21 and 22, playing "The Vic-
tors."
It is because of the local organi-
zation's ability to play "The Victors"
that it was chosen to represent the
Michigan delegation at the meeting
of the Seventh Federal district of Lib-
erty committees in Chicago for the
fifth war loan.
The seventh district comprises
southern Michigan and Wisconsin, and
northern Indiana and Illinois. Russel
W. Boyle, district organizer, said that
he could have picked a band from any
of these states, but finally decided that
the Varsity band could not be beaten.
George Millan, chairman of Wash-
tenaw county, and the band will leave
Thursday night for Chicago. Professor
J. R. Brumm and Captain Wilfred
Wilson will accompany the band. All
expenses are to be paid by the gov-
ernment.
Lawyers Disport
Friday Evening
Although it is an established fact
that the laws, and senior laws espe-
cially, have little time for social friv-
olities, yet once a year the senior laws
lay aside their Torts and Blackstones
and step forth to their Crease dance.
This year the traditional affair will be
held at the old Union on Friday even-
ing, March 21.
Leo Carrigan, chairman of the so-
cial committee, promises varied enter-
tainment throughout the evening be-
sides the customary program of 16
dances. There will be singing by a

trio and solos by Garrett Pat Conway.
A special dancing act will be an un-
usual novelty. Phil Diamond's or-
chestra will play for the dancing.
Everything pertaining to the dance
will be legal in form. The invita-
tions are issued as model subpoenas
and the programs are in the form of a
common declaration of a suit at law.
The big event of the .evening will
be the appearance of the Crease pa-
I)r. This will take place during the
, <i mission instead of before the
dancing begins, as was the former
custom. Nothing is known about this
year's irease paper except the fact
that the tdit.er is A. J. Levin, and that
with the exc,. otion of one or two oth-
ers, it will be written entirely by him.
The chaperones for the affair are
Prof. Henry M. Bates, dean of the law
school, and Mrs. Bates; 'Prof. E. R.
Sunderland and Mrs. Sunderland; and
Prof. Willard T. Barbour and Mrs.
Barbour.

Porto Rico May Introduce Bill
Providing For Her Independence

Washington, March 14. - Twenty
members of the house of representa-
tives will visit Porto Rico in April to,
study political and economic condi-
tions with a view to obtaining infor-
1ation for the solving of legislative
problems affecting the island which
are to come before the next congress.J

Delegate Davila, Porto Rico's repre-
sentative in congress, announced to-
day that he would introduce a bill to
fix definitely the future policy of the
United 'States toward the island. He
said he would not decide until after
his return to Washington whether or
not the bill would provide for ,inde-
pendence.

DISPOSAL OF HOP'
TI'CKETS NOT SURE
Limit for Receiving Applications
Probably to be Changed to
March 20
DEFINITE POLICY ANNOUNCED
FOLLOWING MEETING SATURDAY
Until the ticket committoe has de-

PROFESSOR UR6ES
AIRCRAFT -DISPOUSAL
Prof. F. W. Pawlowski Says Sacrifice
Sale of Aviation Government
Equipment Best
RAPID GROWTH OF FLYING AS
SCIENCE MAKES PLAN FEASIBLE
w Commenting upon the report that

FOREIGN STUDENTS
INITIATE TONIGHT
Internationalism will be the key-note
of the reception for members of the
Cosmopolitan club to be given at 7:30
o'clock Saturday, March 15, at the
Martha Cook residence.
Numbers on they program to be furn-
ished by the Cosmopolitan club will
be: vocal solo by Mrs. H. M. Dyason,
School of Music, from South Africa;
recitation by Lovisa B. Youngs, '21,
from Canada; mandolin solo by A. M.
Elkind, '20, from China; explanation
of jiujitsui by Bunzaburo Sashida,
from Japan; string quartet composed
of members from South America; and
vocal solo by Armin Friedman, '20.
Accompaniments will be played by K.
F. Rindelhardt, '20E, from Canada.
Following the program there will
be initiation of new members, which
will include the singing of the Latin
hymn, Gaudeamnus Igitur, ritual read-
ing, and presentation of pins. A large
number is to be initiated, including
several Americans.
R FURNITURE T
BE' MADE IN ANN AROR

cided as to the method of distributing I the war department contemplates sell-I

tickets for the J-Hop, no more appli-
cations should be sent to Karl Velde,
'20, the chairman of the Hop commit-
tee.
The original limit for receiving ap-
plications was March 15, but this wvill
probably be extended to Thursday,
March 20* because of the necessity
for providing means of ticket distri-
bution.
In the past requests for tickets have
been sent to Karl Velde, but they will
now be sent probably to W. G. Har-
bert, '20E, chairman of the ticket
committee. The method of distribu-
tion undoubtedly will be through the
mails, thus eliminating the long wait
of former years.
At a meeting of the ticket commit-
tee Saturday afternoon, a definite pol-
icy will be adopted and detailed an-
nouncement will appear in The Daily
Sunday. The following committees
were appointed a the J-Hop com-
mittee meeting Friday afternoon:
Ticket committee, W. G. Harbert,
'20E, chairman; David Landis, '20,
and J. S. Perrin, '20; booth committee,
C. T. Hogan, '20E, chairman; and
Joseph Tracy, '20E.
OFFICERS ELECTED
BY SAGINAW CLUB
Officers for the current year were
elected by the Saginaw club at its first
meeting Thursday evening in the new
Union. They are as follows: Presi-
dent, John S. Goodman, '20E; vice-
president, Eugene Opperman, '22L;
'treasurer, M. C. Fettig, '19E; and mem-
ber of executive committee,, Albert
Lent, '21E. About 25 members were
present.
Plans were discussed for giving the
club's annual Sprout in Saginaw dur-
ing the spring vacation.
DONNYBROOK FAIR PATTERN
FOR CELTIC DANCE TONIGHT
Unitarian Young People's Society to
Hold Irish Affair in Guild
Rooms
Shamrockst and Irish green will be
the dominating features in the St.
Patrick's day dance, Saturd'ay even-
irg, at the Unitarian guild rooms for'
members of the Unitarian Young Peo-
ple's society.
Airs from the- Emerald isle, and
musical selections from the bards*of
old Erin will be included in the pro-
gram, which will be fashioned as near-
ly as possible after a Donnybrook
fair. Tickets for the Celtic dance can
be obtained from members of the
Young People's society.

ing for junk the greater part of $1,673,-
000,000 worth of aviation equipment,
Prof. Felix W. Pawlowski, head. of the

aeronautical engineering department BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS DEPT.'

of the University, suggests that the
government would do much better to

DOES MUCH WORK ON
BUILDING

sell the equipment at a sacrifice in
an effort to popularize the science and
industry of aeronautics.
Large Stock on Hand
"Now that the war is over, the air
craft material in the possession of the
government is far in excess of the
need. The equipment was prepared to
meet the needs of an army of 5,900,-
000. If sold for junk, the disposition.
would be almost a complete waste. If
kept for future use, the material would
soon be out of date in view of the
rapid growth of the science of flying,
and would represent a loss.
Chance to Buy Planes
"The best thing that can be done
with the excess of flying equipment is
to sell it, even at a sacrifice, for the
popular use of everyone. The mate-
rial will contribute enormously to the
development and furtherance of flying
in America. Many of the wealthy and
middleclass would be able to avail
themselves of air planes at the sacri-
fice price.
Would Aid Industry
"Such a method of disposing of our
surplus aircraft would revert to the
benefit of the country and America
would get its money back in a differ-
ent form; in the development of a
great industry. It has been the usual
policy of European governments to
patronize and foster new industries,
as is shown in the efforts of the Brit-
ish in assisting shipbuilding, and of
France in aiding automobile produc-
tion and popularization.
"The government could do nothing
better than make the people see the
possibilities and the utility of a prac-
tical industry of aeronautics," Profes-
sor Pawlowski concluded.
ELECTRIC CLOCK,
MEDIC MEMORIAL
An electric clock is the memorial
which the 1919 medical class will
leave, according to Leonard F. Thal-
ner, '19M, who was elected chairman
of the senior medic memorial commit-
tee at a meeting of the class Wednes-
day.
The clock is to be placed in the
amphitheater at the University hos-
pital. This, will be a great addition,
as there has been no time piece in
the room up to the present. It has
always been customary for the sen-
ior medics to give a separate mem-
orial from the regular senior gift.
The other two members of the com-
mittee are Margaret A. Miller, '19M,
and Catherine A. Brown.

Practically all the furniture in the
new Library will be manufactured
in Ann Arbor by the buildings and
grounds department of the University.
Orders amounting to $12,000 have
been placed with this department, the
work to include reading tables, as-
sembly room tables, desks, and filing
cases. The shelving in the stacks has
already been installed by them.
The furniture will be made from the
beft quarter-sawed oak obtainable and
should be of the finest possible con-
struction, the department being well
equipped to do first-class work, hav-
ing its own' dry-kiln, and the newest
wood-working lathes.
Besides making the furniture, the
buildings and grounds department has
played a large part in the work on the
building, having practically completed
other contracts amounting to $70,000.
They installed the heating and venti-
lating system, the elevators and the
plumbing. They did all the painting
of the stacks, on a cost basis, for the
Snead Iron Works of New York City,
and they also painted all the wood-
work in the building.
They will lay the side-walks to the
Library and will put in a driveway
leading to the basement at the east
end.
Classicism Topic
of 2iabbit Talk
"We are living, today, in an age of
turmoil, and must be on our guard
against idealistic, romantic ideas,"
stated Professor Babbitt of Harvard
university in a lecture on "Romantic-
ism and Classicism" Friday afternoon
in the Natural Science lecture room.
In his discussion of the matter Pro-
fessor. Babbit pointed to the fact that
the present tendency in our literature
is toward the extreme romantic. Fif-
ty years ago no one would have given
the matter a second thought, but to-
day it is a question of vital interest.
In pointing out the difference between
the classic and the romantic he show-
ed the romantic to represent the free
run of the imagination, tending toward
the melodramatic, while the elassic,
on the other hand, was more con-
servative.
Criticism to the extent of 18 vol-
umes has already been written on the
subject, France taking the lead in the
movement.
"The romantic," said Professor Bab-
bit, "Should be carefully confined to
our recreative moments."
Ann Arbor High Defeats Jackson Five
Ann Arbor high walked away with
the Jackson quintet defeating them
28 to 15 in a basketball game last
night in the local high school. This
makes seven games won for the local
team out of 13. The Ann Arborites
play M. A. C. for the high school
championship. The Jackson reserves
lost to the Ann Arbor reserves by a
12 to 11 score

-,JUST SETTLEM NT .
oFrLAOR STRIKES
GENERAL ADOPTION OF REAL
PARTNERSHIP SYSTEM
URGED
WAGES SHOULD VARY
WITH WORKS' PROFITS
Should Reject. Idea That Leisure
Rather Than Labor Is Main
Object of Life
(By Associated Press)
Paris, March 14. - Emil Cottin, who
made an attempt on the life of Pre-
mier Clemenceau, was today sen-
tenoed to death by the court martial
which was frying him. The verdict
of the court martial was unanimous.
Boston, March 14.-A program for
co-operation between 'capital and la-
bor designed to bring about "a just
settlement of industrial strikes," was
outlined today by Charles W. Elliot,
president-emeritus of Harvard univer-
sity, at a legislative hearing on a bill
for the appointment of a special com-
mission-"to study the hours of labor in
Massachusetts' industries.
"'Genluine Partnership"
As a final basis for his program
Dr. Elliot, proposed "general adoption
of a genuine partnership system be-
tween the capital and labor engaged in
any given works or plan, whereby the
returns to capital and labor alike aft-
er the wages are paid shall vary wth
the profits of the establishment, the
percentage of the profits going to .the
payroll being always much larger that
that going to shareholders or own-
ers, and the payroll never being call-
ed upon to make good losses. As a
means of securing to employes full
knowledge of the partnership accounts
they should always be represented in
the dictorate."
Co-operative Management
He advocated universal adoption of
co-operative management and disci-
pline, increased welfare provision for
employes, abandonment of the "con-
ception that capital is the natural
enemy of labor and that unorganized
laborers are traitors to their class,"
and of the "idea that it is desirable for
workers of any sort to work as few
hours in a day as possible," and, "ab-
solute rejectin of the notion that
leisure rather than steady work
should be the main object of life."
PLANS ANNOUNCED
FOR OLD TIME SING
An old time singing school will be
a
given at 8 o'clock Monday evening in
Lane hall. Mr. Newton C. Fetter will
act as singing master in this unique
production and Mrs. George B. Rhead
as accompanist.
Local artists will take prominent
part, Miss Nora Hunt, contralto, and
Mr. Earl Martin, vaudeville artist, ap-
pearing. A "tender duet" is promised
by Winona Beckley, '19, and Mr. Levi
D. Wines.
Rounds, solos, and choruses make
up the program which will be given
in old-fashioned costumes.
Tickets are 25 cents and will be on
sale at Wahr's and Foster's. The
money is for the benefit of, the Wom-
en's society of the first Baptist

church.
SEND ORIGINAL DISCHARGES
Misunderstanding as to the
use of the duplicate discharge
papers of men applying for the
$60 bonus has caused thegov-
ernment officials in charge of
these payments much trouble.
Many men have been sending
in the duplicates and not the
originals which are required,
the duplicates being merely to
showdthedischarged man's ser-
vice or to get another discharge
paper should the original be lost
in the mail.
All duplicates mailed to Wash-
ington are being returned with
requests for the original-dis-
charges.

122E
Tickets for smoker on sale in Room
348 Eng. Building 8-12 this morning

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