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March 13, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-13

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THE.WEATHER
CLOUDY AND COLDER
WITH SNOW FLURRIES

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 113. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS
99

PRESIDENT

HARRY

B.

HUTCHINS
NOT NAMED

RESIGNS-S UCCESSOR

U3 S TO MAINTAIN'
16 AERODROMES1
3 BALLOON FIELDS
TEXAS, FLORIDA, MISSISSIPPI,
GEORGIA AND OKLAHOMA
FAVORED AS SITES
LEASED 'DROMES TO BE
PURCHASED BY GOVT.
Actual Instruction in Flying Planned
X for Only Two Camps; Others
Held in Reserve
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 12.-Assignment
of the 85th, Michigan and Wisconsin
National Army divisions, and nine am-
bulance sections to early convoy was
announced today by the war depart-
peut. The ambulance section are
501st, 509th, 546th, 594th, 565th, 657th,
635th, and 642nd.
Washington, March 12.-Sixteen fly-
ing fields and three balloon fields are
to be maintained permanently by the
war department Acting Secretary Cro-
well said today. The fields have not
yet been definitely decided upon, but
the secretary said two would be near
Newport News, three on the Pacific
coast, one near New. York, one in Tex-
as, two in Florida, three in Mississippi,
one on the Great Lakes and one each
In Georgia and Oklahoma.
The sixteenth field probably will be
Gerstner Field, Lake Charles, La.
Fields which are to be retained and
which are now leased, will be pur-
chased by the governnent, Mr. Cro-
well said. Actual instruction in fly-
in, however, will be conducted at only
two fields, as previously announced.
The others will beheld in reserve.
PRESIDENT'S ACTION
CAUESES REGE

Pr ogress 'Harks
Hutchins ' Regime
With such works as the backing of
the University of Michigan ambulance
unit, and the building of the new li-
brary attributed to him, authorities
give Pres. Harry B. Hutchins one of
the foremost places in the construc-
tive work of the University.
At the outbreak of the war Presi-
dent Hutchins was largely responsi-
ble for the backing given the ambu-
lance unit by the alumnae, for his let-
ters to them brought much needed aid.
Library 'Result of Efforts
It was entirely through his efforts
that the smaller and inadequate li-
brary of the University was done
away with, and the new and larger
one is being built. Through plans
formulated by President Hutchins, the
new library will be one of the most
complete in the country.
The Natural Science building and
University heating plants are products
of his Constructive platform, while he
was also responsible for many of the
newer additions to the University and
campus.
President Hutchins' war work also
embodied his support of the Liberty
Loan, the United War work, and other
war time campaigns. The success of
these are largely attributed to the sup-
port that he gave, them.
Racks University Union
He was one of the organizers of the
American University Union in Eu-
rope, which made its headquarters in
Paris, thereby becoming a meeting
place for the University men in the
service overseas. He holds the office
of trustee of that organization.
The introduction of the S. A. T. C.
and naval units into the universities
of America had his backing, as he
maintained that despite the war, edu-
cation must continue. With this in
mind, he approved the idea of men
going to school at the same time that
they were preparing for war.
No student activities on the campus
of just character, according to rec-
ords, lacked his support. His platform
was for the best there was in the
University.
in reorganizing the University, in
strengthening the ties between it and
its alumni, and in securing funds for
building splendid buildings, and in
adding strong men to the faculty. His
dignity, firmness and unfailing cour-
tesy will always be remembered and
appreciated by his colleagues. Michi-
gan owes him a debt of gratitude."
Dean Bates of the Law School.
"I regret President Hutchin's resig-
nation very much. He was a success-
ful and judicious man, and a wise ad-
ministrator."
Dean Hinsdale of the Homoeopathic
Medical School.
"President Hutchins came into of-
fice during a very critical period in
the history of the University and has
guided its affairs with great wisdom
and tact. His contributions to the
success of the institution have been
most marked."
Dean Kraus of the Summer Session.
"It is with real personal r'egret that
I learn of President Hutchins' resig-
nation. A month ago in New York I
had an opportunity to see how much
he was loved by Michigan men there,
and I am sure that his, work in or-
ganizing our alumni, who have con-
tributed more than' $2,000,000 to the
University during the last 10 years,
will long be remembered as one of

the significant achievements of his ad-
ministration."
Dean Effinger, College of Literature,
7"ience and Arts.

PRESIDENVS IFE
STORY TEISWITH
BIG ACHIEVEMENTS
ENTERS UNIVERSITY BY MERE
CHANCE; GRADUATES
IN 1871
REORGANIZES ALUMNI;
IS LEGAL AUTHORITY
Organizer of Cornell Law Department;
Dean of University School
and Law Practitioner
(By P. G. W.)
President 'Harry B. Hutchins, whose
resignation as the president of the
University of Michigan was accept-
ed by the Board of Regents at, an ad-
journed session Wednesday, was born
at Lisbon, New Hampshire, April 8,
1847, and Is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Carlton B. Hutchins.
He began his early advent into the
educational world by preparation for
college at the New Hampshire Con-
ference seminary at Tilton, later con-
tinuing his course at the Vermont
seminary, Newbury. At the age of 19.
he entered the Wesleyan university,
Middletown, Conn., but was unable to
complete the year there on account
of failing health.
Coes Here By Chancee
For some months thereafter he made
special studies in anatomy, physio-
logy, and surgery at the University of
Vermont and at Dartmouth college
under the direction of Dr. Alpheus 1.
Crosby.
In 1867, the Hutchins' family re-
moved to Michigan. One day by mere
chance President Hutchins' father was
detained a few hours in Ann Arbor
by business purposes, and was so
favorably impressed with the sur-
roundings of the University that he
decided to send his son here.
Ranks High as Student
Accordingly in the fall of 1867,
President Hutchins entered the Uni-
versity from which he was graduated
with the degree of bachelor of phil-
osophy in 1871. His career as a stu-
dent during this time was a brilliant
one. As an undergraduate he stood
in the front rank of his class, being
chosen editor of The Chronicle in his
senior year, class orator, and finally
Commencement speaker-the highest
honor conferred by the University
faculty.
Receives Professorship
For a year after graduation he vas
in charge of the public schools of
Owosso, returning to the University
in the fall of 1872 as instructor in
history and rhetoric. The following
year he was given a professorship.
In 1876, he resigned his position and
formed a partnership with his father-
in-law, Thomas M. Crocker, under the
firm name of Crocker and Hutchins,
of Mount Clemens and Detroit. For
the next eight years this relation re-
mained unbroken, the' firm doing a
large business in the highest courts o
the state.
Organizes Law School
At the request of the University he
returned in 1884 and became Jay pro-
fessor of law. His success here was
such that in 1887, when the trustees
of Cornell university were seeking a
man to organize a law department
for that institution, the choice fell up-
on President Hutchins, who immedi-

ately took up this new work. At the
end of eight years the department had
grown to be one of the leading law
schools of the country
It was in 1895 that he was again
recalled to the University as Dean
of the Department of Law, then be-
ing'the largest institution of its class
in the country. During 1897-98, he
served as acting president, President
Angell then being minister to Tur-
key. Upon the resignation of Presi-
(Continued on Page Six)

PRESI)E'NT HARRY BURNS HUTCHINS
PRESIDENT HUT2HINS---AN APPRECIATION
President harry B. Hutchins has resigned.
President of the University for nearly nine years, student, graduate,
Professor, and Dean at Michigan before that time, President Hutchins is
a picture of the ideal Michigan man. As a student he won the highest hon-
ors of his class. As a Professor in the Law school and soon afterward its
Dean, his work was so highly valued that when an acting President was
needed, there was no hesitancy about who should be chosen.
President Hutchins accepted the position as head of the University
with the distinct understanding that within five years a successor to him
should be appointed. When the time came, and no choice had been made,
he generously agreed to stay until anew President could be found. This
proved to be longer than he had anticipated.
But with true Michigan spirit, the spirit that has made his University
one of the most noted in the world, the President has stood by his post in
the face of personal discomfort and inconvenience. Nor has he stood idly.-
His services to the University need not be reiterated. The new buildings
he has been instrumental in having erected, the genius for organization
and administration that has made him eminent throughout the country,
give him a position unique among American educators.
Toward The Daily President ,Hutchins has always been friendly and
helpful. The Daily deeply appreciates his never-failing kindness and con-

UNIVESITY HEAD
SEES NECESSITY
PROF. D. L. FRIDAY TO RETURN
AFTER ABSENCE OF
TWO YEARS
PROFESSOR HENDERSON
GRANTED NEW POSITION
Army Officials Seek Re-establishment
of Officers' Reserve Corps
Here
(By Thomas F McAllister)
President Harry Burns Hutchins of
the University of Michigan has re-
signed.
Twice acting-president, and since
1910 president, the news of the res-
ignation, taking effect June 30, comes
as a surprise and shock to the alumni
and student body in Ann Arbor. Fol-
lowing the acceptance by the Board of
Regents yesterday afternoon at an
adjourned meeting, it was learned that
the action was taken at the request
of the president made in the follow-
ing letter tendered to the board more
than two years ago:
Desire of Two Years' Standing
"Ann Arbor, Michigan,
October 12, 191.
"To the Regents of the University of
Michigan:
"Gentlemen-My acceptance of the
presidency of the University was up-
on the express condition that my
term of service be limited to the
period of five years from the first day
of October, 1910.
"Upon the expiration of that period
you very graciously asked me to
waive the condition and continue in
service. To this I consented. But I
feel that the time has now come when
provision has been made for a suc-
cessor. I therefore tender my res-
ignation to take effect at your pleas-
ure. I beg to express the hope, how-
ever, that I may be relieved of the
responsibilities of the office at an
early date.
"May I take this opportunity to as-
sure you of my deep appreciation of
the considerate and generous treat-
ment'and the cordial support that I
have always received from every mem-
ber of the board.
"HARRY B. HUTCHINS."
Regents Seek Reconsideration
Though the letter was ,submitted
two years ago, the Regents failed to
take any action, and the most serious
efforts have been made to have Dr.
Hutchins reconsider the affair. All
have finally proved of no avail. His
continued insistance that a younger
successor be secured without delay,
in order to meet the new problems of
a period of reorganization and recon
struction at last prevailed, and'the
board accepted the resignation in the
following resolution:
"Whereas - On October 12, 1916,
President Hutchins requested' that he
be retired from the responsibility of
his office at an early date, and that
his successor be eledted, now, there-
fore,
(Continued on Page Six)
WOMEN INVITED TO DINNER
University girls are especially
requested to attend the supper
to be held under the auspices

of the citizenship league at 6
o'clock Thursday at the Presby-
terian church. It is expected
that 450 women will be served.
Forty cents will be charged for
the meal.
Tickets for the supper may be
obtained from Miss Sara Whe-
don, ticket chairman, or Mrs,
King, 1203 Oakland avenue, but
will also be sold at the door.

HEADS OF
EXTOL

VARIOUS COLLEGES
ADMINISTRATIVE
GENIUS

Expressing the feelings of their dif-
ferent colleges, the deans of the Uni-
versity made the following remarks
regarding the resignation of Pres.
Harry B. Hutchins:
"I am very sorry that President
Hutchins found it necessary to re-
sign. He has made a splendid pres-
ident, has given attention to every
department, and has always striven
to do the best for the University in
every direction."
Dean Vaughan of the Medical School.
"President Hutchins is entitled to
high praise from the state and from
the faculties of the University for his
long and able administration. Few
realize the overpowering responsibil-
itles and the perplexing questions
which President Hutchins has met so
ably in dealing with war conditions.
After the arduous year of war prepa-
ration and re-adjustment, he certainly
deserves a rest. We shall miss his
genial presence and his firm hand at
the head of our administrative staff.
We are all proud to have served under
such eminent educators as President
Angell and President Hutchins."
Dean Butts of the Colleges of En-
gineering and Architecture.
Dean Cooley of the Engineering cot-
lege was out of town and could not,
be reached. I

geniality, and with the campus and
resignation with. genuine regret.

the alumni of Michigan, views his

THE EDITOR.

SCARCITY Of TRYOUTS
THREATENSGLEE CLUB;
President Harry B Hutchins gave

STUINT COUNCIL ASKS
COMPULSORY ASSEMBLIES
That the literary college -needs com-

the following interview Wednesday re- pulsory assemblies was the decision

garding the Glee club, which is in
danger of disorganization because of
lack of tenors:
"I am advised that the Glee club
is having difficulties in securing sing-
ers. I regard the club as a most im-
portant University organization, which
should be encouraged. It would be
unfortunate, if for lack of encourage-
ment, the club should be suspended as
an organization even temporarily. I
trust that the present difficulties may
be overcome by numerous applications
for membership."
Registrar Arthur G. Hall commended
the club's work in the University, es-
pecially during recent years, and said,
"As far back as I can remember Mich-
igan has always had a Glee club which
has brought credit to the school. It
would be unfortunate if the club
should not organize this year,"
Tryouts for the Glee club are to be
held at 7:30 o'clock Thursday night
in Mr. Theodore Harrison's studio at
the University School of Music.

reached by the student council at its
meeting Wednesday night.
A unanimous vote in favor of the
plan was the outcome of consider-
able discussion as to how compulsory
assemblies affected the unity of the
various classes in the Engineering col-
lege. A committee was appointed to
bring up the matter with the Univer-
sity authorities.
Another topic much in favor with
the councilmen was the proposal of a
mass meeting of an unusual type. The
purpose of the assembly, if it is real-
ized, will be to commemorate the
Michigan men who fell in the war, and
to welcome those that have returned.
The first five articles of the new
constitution for the council were ac-
cepted, subject to the vote of the cam-
pus at the all-campus election.
Seniors to Sign Class Roll Thursday
Seniors are requested to appear in
Dean Effinger's office from 1 to 3:30
o'clock this afternoon and leave their
addresses, if they have not done so.

"It has been known for a long time
that President Hutchins has wanted Benefit Picture Show Success
to resign. It is unnecessary to say Delta Gamma sorority sold all of the
that his leaving the presidency will 500 tickets for the performances at
be greatly regretted. President Hutch- the Arcade thi ater yesterday, the pro-
ins. began his administration under ceeds of which will go to the fund for
difficult and trying conditions, but he the benefit of Belgian babies. About
has shown great skill and wisdom $50 was realized.

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