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March 07, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-07

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THE WEATHER I
POSSIBLY SNOW;
COLDEK

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A I AdWr
,a AOL
Batt

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY~ AND) NWIIT WEi

VOL. XXIX. No. 108. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1919. PRICE THREE CE

BOL-SHEVIK!, SICK
AND -STARVED, EAT
CAS9T-5$3 EA1C'H
DEATH AND WOOD SCARCITY
SWAMPS FORCES OF
UNDERTAKERS
RUSSIA IS QUESTION
FOR COMMON HUMANITY
"Hungar Typhus" Carries Off Young
and Old Everywhere; Glanders
Epidemic in Moscow
Paris, March 6.-Lithuanians living
in eastern Prussia, according to re-
ports from Kovno, have asked the as-
sistance of Entente powers in pro-
tecting their material interests against
the Germans. The Lithuanians, it is
added, demande that the part of East
Prussia inhabited by them be dis-
poined from Germany.
(By Associated Press)
London, March 6 (British wireless
service).-Starvation prevails through-
out Bolshevik Russia and is killing off
the poulation by thousands. Diseases
due to under-nourishment are ram-
pant and food is so scarce in Petro-
grad and Moscow that cats sell -ead-
ily for $3 each. The undertakers can-
not cope with conditions as there is
not enough wood for coffins.
"Situation Terrible"
These reports have been brought
to the attention of the British govern-
.ment within the last week by British
subjects recently returned from Rus-
sia. Their evidence is unanimous that
the food situation is indescribably
terrible and that if means are not
found to alleviate it- the inhabitants
of Bolshevik Russia may starve to
death.
The Britishers say that the plight of
Russia is a direct result of the reign
of arnachy and terror instituted by
Lenine and Trotzky. They declare
that the Russian problem has ceased
to be a political question and has be-
(Continued on page six)
STAMPS CH GENYRE
TO COLLECTORS - REEVES

FRESH ENGINEERS
PLAN JAZZ SMOKER
Real jazz music by a band chosen
from members of the freshman engi-
ner class will feature the smoker to
be held for the first year engineers
March 18 in the Michigan Union. This
was decided at the social committee
meeting held recently.
It is planned to secure Dean Cooley
of the College of Engineering as the
principal speaker. Other men from the
faculty will probably be asked to talk
also.
Stunts and musical numbers by rep-
resentatives of the class will fill out
the evening's program.
Arrangements for a vigorous ticket
sale have been made by the social
committee, and a corps of assistants
were appointed to aid them.
ENGINEERS TO LISTEN
TO INDUSTRIA SPEECH

Wear All Of Your Uniform
Or None, Says JMaior Durkee
"Wearing the army uniform is pefectly all right, providing the
men wear discharge stripes," said Major Ralph H. Durkee when
questioned as to the propriety of University men wearing their
uniforms.
He objects, however, to mixing part of the uniform with civ-
iliah clothes. The worst offense in the major's mind is wearing a
toque instead of the army hat with the kakhL
"But," he conculded, "wearing a uniform overcoat with civilian
clothes is perfectly all right in my estimation."

FEW BUY TICKETS
FOR FROSH MIXER
Despite elaborate preparation being
made by the committee in charge of
the freshman mixer to be held Satur-
day, in Barbour gymnasium, tickets
have not been going as fast as was
anticipated.
Present indications are to the ef-
fect that less than half of the class
will be present. The committee
in charge, however, expects a rush
for tickets today. They can be ob-
tained at Wahr's, Calkin's, and Quar-
ry's stores.
Matthew Lamport, '22, chairman of
the committee in charge of the mixer
refused to give out any details of the
entertainment, but promises some-
thing different in the way of diversion.
MICHIGAN'S SKIN CLI NIC
CUNTRY'S BEST-ZEISLER

RECONSTRUCTION WORK
DISCUSSED BY
RINDGE

WILL BE1

SAYS
OF

CIO11Y PROMOTES STUDY
WORLD, WITH INTEREST
TO CHILDREN

To meet demands for a broadened
subject made by various University
classes which he has addressed in the
apst two days, Mr. Fred H. Rindge,
leader of the industrial service move-
ment for the national Y. M C A., will
speak on the "The Human Factor in
Industry" at 7:30 o'clock Friday in
Hill auditorium. He will include in
his talk the essentials of "The Hu-
man Side of Engineering," and a dis-
cussion of industrial reconstruction.
During the war Mr. Rindge served
as a member of the industrial service
section of the ordnance department,
acting as liaison officer between the
government and the Y. M. C. A. He
will include in his lecture, an account
of his work in the Americanization of
foreigners, concluding with an actual
demonstration of his methods of teach-
ing English to them, without a knowl-
edge of the foreign tongue and with-
out the aid of an interpreter. '
Mr. Rindge has kept in active touch
with all the prominent social service
and industrial leaders in the course of
his work. His contributions have ap-
peared in a number of the leading
magazines of the country, including
the World's Work and Harpers. His
lecture tours have included all of the
large educational institutions, and he
comes to Ann Arbor from the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin.
The lecture Friday Nwill be given
under the auspices of the Engineer-
ing society and the Commerce club,
and will be presided over by C. T.
Van Dusen, '19E, president of the En-
gineering society, assisted by J. P1
Adams, '19, president of the Commerce
club.
MEDICAL SOCIETY
INITIATES, F I V E
Alpha Omega Alpha, medical upper-
class scholarship society, held its an-
nual spring initiation Thursday noon,
at the Michigan Union. Following
the luncheon, Dr. Mark Marshall, '07M,
acted as toastmaster. Dr.-J. G. Van
Zwaluwenburg, '07M, spoke for the
charter members of the Michigan
chapter.
The Alpha Omega Alpha address
was given by the general secretary
of the order, Dr. W. W. Root, of Slat-
erville Springs, N. Y. Founded in
1902 at the University of Illinois, the
society now has chapters in the lead-
ing medical schools of the United
States and -Canada. The Michigan
chapter was installed in 1907.
At the meeting the following mem-!
bers of the class of 1920 were initiat-
d: AKugustus Kirchnet, Clarence A.
Kretzschmar, Donald Kudnar, Norman
I F, Miller, and Chas. N. Weller.

STUDEfNT C OUl N CL
OPENS ACTIIVIIES
Signify Intention of Making Coming
Semester One of Biggest in
History of University
"WILL INAUGURATE "BRING
BACK A MAN" CAMPAIGN, SOON
(By R. S.)
Believing that a university is the
most fitting place to instill patriotism
and a vital interest in contemporary
events into the minds of the young
men and women of today, the Stu-
dent council is planning to utilize all
power vested in it to promote a more
prevalent interest in all activities that
go to make up the normal life on the
campus.
With the return of a great number
of former students, the council be-
lieves that the Union, Varsity ath-
letics, the Y. M. C. A., class athletics,
and class activities will find them-
selves enhanced by the eperience
these students have obtained during
their period in service. It feels that
the council should see to it that every
member of the undergraduate body
finds his niche in the other-than-book
events that go to make up the vicar-
ious life in the campus world.
Adopts Principles
Being the hub of the University, this
organization feels itself in a position
to adopt the following principles as a
broad basis of improvement:
1. Provision of an effective means
of communication between the under-
graduate body and the University au-
thorities.
2. Interpretation and maintenance
of Michigan traditions and customs.
3. General supervision over stu-
dent activities, organizations, tradi-
tions, customs, and conduct.
4. The crystallization and making
effective the sanest of undergraduate
opinions.
The constitution of the council lim-
its its personnel to not less than 20,
nor more than 30 men, elected for a
period of three semesters from the
upper classes of the seven different
colleges of the University. The repre-
sentatives are proportioned according
to the numbers enrolled in the vari-
ous colleges. Officers are elected by
the members of the council for terms
of one semester.
New Constitution
A new constitution has been drawn
up by the council members, the main
points of which are: officers shall
hold office for the entire school year;,
the officers shall be nominated by the
council members and voted on at the
annual campus election; those elected
to the council shall remain active un-
til graduation if that term does not
exceed four semesters. At the next
council meeting each point in the new
constitution will be discussed separ-
ately and the acceptance of the final
draft will be subject to the discretion
of the entire student body.
The promoting of "Bring Back a
Man" campaign will also be discussed
at the next meeting of the Student
council. Ralph E, Gault. '19, presi-
dent of the council, is of the opinion
that this will be a fitting motto for
every student to observe when leav-
ing for the summer vacation.

COMMITT1EES FOR
OPERA ANNOUNCED,
Play Will Be More Work This Year
Than Ever Before, Because
of Extra Act
TWENTY-FIVE MEN ON STAFF
TO MANAGE PRODUCTION
Members of opera committees who
will take care of the business inter-
ests and staging of "Come On Dad," the
Union Opera, were announced yester-
day by Ferdinand C. Bell, general
chairman. They will begin their du-
ties immediately.
More work is connected with the
production this year than heretofore,
says Mr. Bell, because the opera con-
tains one more act than any in past
years, and the company numbers
about 20 more people. This necessi-
tates the handling of more scenery and
properties, he says, and the care of
many more costumes. The program
and opera extra will be published as
usual.
The following men were appointed
on committees:
Assistants to General Chairman,
Carl T. Hogan, '20E; William A.
Leitzinger, '20, and William W. Hin-
shaw, Jr., '20; Stage, Clayton Shoe-
maker, '20E; Edward Kreuger; and
Don Stratton; Advertising Walter
Reiss, '20; Mirray Gardener, '20E;
Lon Scheidler, '20E; Herman De Le-
no, '20; and William Wachs, '20; Pu-
licity, Russell Barnes, '20; Edgar
Rice, '20, and Herbert Slusser, '20;
Properties, Charles J. Sullivan, '19A;
Gilbert Schafer, '20; and E. H. Luth-
er, '21E; Costumes, Charles Norton,
'19E; Hugo Braun, '19L; M. W. Wil-
liam W. Peattie, '21E; Russell Mc-
Caughey, '21L; Music, Jack Reilly,
'20E; William Frazier, '20E; Electri-
cians, H. N. Collins, '19E; A. F. King,
'20E
1,000 TEACHERS EXPECTED
TO BE PRESENT AT INSTITUTE
Schoolmasters Club to Meet at Same
Time; Address on Italy a
Feature
About a thousand teachers, princi-
pals, and superintendents of Michi-
gan are expected to meet on, April 1,
2 and 3 in Ann Arbor for the annual
meeting of the Schoolmasters' club
and the Short Term Institute. Plans
for programs and entertainment are
being completed for both of these con-
ventions and they offer unusual at-
tractions for the schoolmasters.
A feature of the program for the
classical conference, under the direc-
tion of the Schoolmasters' club will
be the address on "Italy After the
War," by Prof. Charles Upton Clark,
on April 2, in Hill auditorium. Pro-
fessor Clark is a member of the
American academy of Rome and
brings with him new motion pictures
furnished by the Italian government
for his lectures.
Plans for a Canadian club snoker
to be held at the Union in the near
future are being made. The date has
not been definitely decided upon as
yet.

MAYO BROTHERS CHOSE
UNIVERSITY MAN TO
DEPARTMENT

FORMER
HEAD)

That the dermatological department
of the University hospital, conducted
by Prof. Udo J Wile, is the best in
this country, was the statement made
Wednesday afternoon by Dr. Joseph
Zeisler of Chicago. In his opinion,
the wide range of skin conditions at-
tracted to Ann Arbor by the reputation
of the department, and the skill and
thoroughness with which they are
studied and treated by Dr. Wile and
his staff, make this the leading clinic
of America.
The standard of the work done at
Michigan is shown, he said, by the
fact that when the Mayo Foundation
decided to inaugurate a department
of dermatology, a member of the Uni-
versity staff was selected to head the
work.
Dr. Zeisler is emeritus protessor of
dermatology at Northwestern univer-
sity, and the only living pupil in
America of Kaposi and Hebra of the
famous Vienna school of skin dis-
eases. Tirough the efforts of Dr. Wile,
he came to Ann Arbor Wednesday,
and held a special clinic in dermatol-
ogy before the upperclassmen of the
medical school.
NEWBERRY ISSUES
STAFF OF ANNUAL
Newberry residence has announcedl
the staff for the Newberry annual
which is published sometime in May.
The publication will contain stories,
art work, jokes and snapshots of in-
terest to those around the dormitory,
becides a calendar of events.
The elections are as follows: Edi-
tor-in-chief, Grace Emery, '19; busi-
ness manager, Edna Apel, '20; assist-
ants, Isabel Swan, '22; Verna Hay,
'19; Esther Pafenbach, '21; Edna
Groff, '22; Josephine McGuiniss, '21;
literary editor, Margaret Rochet, '21;
assistants, Stella Brunt, '22; Phyllis
Burton, '22; joke editor, Frances Stev-
ens, '21; and Dorothy Fink, '21; art
editor, Helen MacGregor, '20; assist-
ants, Nona Doherty, '22; Eleanor
Brown, '22; Frances Graves, '21;
Kameyo Sadakata, '19; Martha Jour-
ard, grad.; snapshots,tMae Blakeslee,
'20; and Isabel Wolfstein, '22A.
IMPORTANT POLITICAL SCI-
ENCE COURSES IN SUMMER
Important courses in political sci-
ence are promised for those attending
the summer session. An interesting
study will be, Diplomacy of the Great
War, awhile other courses which will
be offered are, American Government,
International Law, and Comparative
European Governments.
The faculty will consist of Prof. E.
S. Corwin of Princeton university,
Prof. J. R. Hayden, and Mr. H. E..
Yntema.

ESS TELLS
GRPHCSTORIES
OF WORLD WAI
TALES OF RUIN AND DESTRUC-
TION BY HUN HOLD INTER-
EST OF AUDIENCE
PARISIAN WOMEN HELP
MAINTAIN H O S P I T A
Husband, One of First Artists to E
list in Service of France; Helped
Invent Camouflage
"After the French women had gi
en their sons and husbands, aft
the Hun had demolished their hom
beyond recognition, the peasant wor
en of France still gave to the su
port of my hospital," said Barone
Huard in her lecture Thursday nig
at Hill auditorium.
Following the retrehting lines of ti
Germans so closely that the dead (
the field of battle had not yet be
buried, Baroness Huard returned
her home to find it ruined by the Ge
man imperial staff. Immediately si
set to work to establish her hospit
which only received 36 cents a d
from the government.
Contributions from the peasant su
tamed it and all workers received a
solutely nothing in their four mont
of service at the chateau Villiers 'ar
later at hospital 232, in Paris.
The hospital was moved to Par
because of the chateau's isolation. T
baroness pledged her support for t
duration of the war and a long perk
afterwards. It is for this that t
baroness is touring the countr
speaking, and selling pictures dra.
by her husband. the first artistt
enter the service of Francesand one
the inventors of camouflage.
She remained with the fleeing r
fugees of Belgian so long upon o
occasion that at one time she w
within sight and rifle range of tl
(Continued on page six)
DEARTH Of TENORS BIOS
FAIR TO STOP GLEE CLU
ORGANIZATION NEEDS 15 MEN F0
HIGHER NOTES, SAYS
HARRISON
"There will be no glee club th
year, unless more tenors. turn out,
least 15 first tenors are needed a
as yet only about seven available mi
have turned out," Theodore Harriso
director of the Glee club, said Thur
day.
Tryouts will be held for firstte:
ors at 7 o'clock Monday evening. T
Glee club will have about 60 me
which will mean 15 to each voic
"The quality of those who have be
selected is excellent. It pomises to
one of Michigan's best Glee clubs
continued Mr. Harrison.
"Out of 4,000 men in the Universil
there certainly should be 15 men wh
have good enough voices to make t
club," he said. "This Is an excelle:
chance to make the organization sin
there is such a dearth of good fu
tenors."
If men who have good base voice

who have not tried out, will come ou
they will still be given a chance.
tryouts are held Monday night, t
personnel of the Glee club will -
published in the Daily Wednesday
Thursday morning.
Mandolin tryouts were held Tue
day and Wednesday nights. The r
sults were entirely satisfactory a
cording to Frank Taber, the directo
and the men who were successful w
be announced in The Daily in the ne
future.

"The collecting of postage stamps
by growing boys and girls will give
them a much broader knowledge of
geography than the average college
student now has," said Prof. Jesse S.
Reevesof the political science depart-
ment, in an international law class
Wednesday.
Collections Beneficial
"Thre benefits are derived from this
hobby," continued Professor Reeves,
"first, a more extensive knowledge of
geography; second, a better idea of
political institutions of the different
countries, and third, a broader view
of the world in general. If a young
person becomes interested in stamps,
it will probably mean that he will
continue this study until he has quite
a comprehensive grip of world con-
ditions.
"In collecting stamps it is neces-
sary to have a knowledge of the dif-
ferent monetary systems. Each new
political party in control of a govern-
ment puts out new stamps, and a good
stamp collector must have some
knowledge of political conditions. It
excites interest in knowledge by giv.
ing a wider view of the world to the
young people. Often a young person's
knowledge of other countries other
than his own, comes by collecting
stamps."

1 __ s

Under Auspices of
Engineering
Society
and-
Commerce Club
FREE
ALL MEN AND WOMEN INVITED

The

Hum..an

Fact oi

In

Industry

HILL
Auditorium
TONIGHT
7:3 - 8:
Sharp at Both Ends

By FRED H. RINDGE of NEW YORK

w
s

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