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March 06, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-06

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THE
FAIR

WEATHER
AND SLIGHTLY
COLDER

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lar

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

F

VOL. XXIX. No. 108. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS
t t f II

GOIERNORS ADOPT
MANY REPORTS ON
PUBLIC QUESTIONS

INVECTIVE AGAINST
GOVERNMENT IS
DENNEI)

GOD AND
CON-

LOWER RATES ON ROAD
MATERIALS SUGGESTED
Iemobolization of Army by Local
Draft Boards Urged by Co-
ference
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 5.-Bitter con-
troviersy raged at the conference of the
governors and mayors today before
the report on the committee on resolu-
tions, making a great variety of rec-
ommendations on Jpublic questiops,
finally was adopted.
A resolution which Governor Cox
announced vWas submitted unanimous-
ly, after elimination of all partisan
subjects, condemned doctrines which
address invective against God and
government.
Expressly disclaiming approval of
fixing of costs the resolutions sanc-
tioned a government approval of price
schedules as a step toward establish-
ing a basis of values. Reduction of
freight rates on all building material,
especially roads material, was sug-
gested. It was declared that reduc-
tion of wages should come only as a
result of reduced living costs.
Recommend "Helpful Offices"
Recommendation was made that
the federal government continue its
"helpful offices," with the view of
averting "serious consequences" in
the financial affairs of public utilities.
Settlement of government contracts,
lifting of government restrictions on
industry and materials as soon as pos-
sible, aind continuation of the federal
survey of natural resources started
during the war were asked. The con-
ference also deplored discontinuance
of federal employment agencies and
urged demobilization of the army by
local draft boards.
U4 of M HELTH SERICE
GIVENEXCEPTION RATING
NUMBER TREATED INCREASES
STEADILY; CHARGES ARE
31 INIMUM
Dr. Richard Clarkes Cabot, well
known writer, in a recent number of
the American magazine said that the
health service work at the Universi-
ties of Michigan and California ap-
proached the ideal.
Figures compiled by the health
service of the number of persons
treated by them during the past five
years show a marked increase in the
percentage of students received as pa-
tients. In 1913 about 57 per cent of
the students in the University re-
ceived medical attention, while in the
year '16-'17, 77 per cent were treated.
Last year, probably due to the war, it
dropped to 59 per cent of the original
enrollment but this is still -better than
the first year.
Charges Nominal
There is probably a lack of knowl-
edge among the students of their
privileges along this line. In the first
place every student is entitled to un-
limited offlee medical attention free
of charge, while only a small charge
is made for house calls, $1 for day
and $2 for night calls, which fee goes
to the health service fund.
Any physician on the staff whom
the student may desire can be chos-
en. The health service is at all
times anxious to doall in its power
to sure and prevent disease.
In addition to this each student is
(Continued on Page Six)

SOPH LITS MAKE
SEMESTER PLANS
After much trouble in getting
started to work, the sophoanore lit-
erary class is laying to with the
greatest pep. Lawrnce Butler, the
president who was elected at the last
meeting, has already announced com-
mittees to start the class activities.
The committees are as follows:So-
cial committee, Fred Petty, chairman,
Dorothy Dunlap, Marian Bath, Fred
Thompson, Jack Gardner, Katrina
Schermerhorn, and John Pentecost;
executive committee, Paul Burkholder,
chairman, John Henry, William Ing-
ham, William Wirt, and Fitzhugh
Brewer; auditing committee, William
Angell, Helen Kolb, and Donald Por-'
ter; finance committee, Ceilan Ror-
ick, Carl Dietrich, Albert Jacobs, Alice
Beckham, and Lawrence Butler.
The sophomores are preparing to
enter the interclass baseball contest
and will soon elect {a representative
to look after their affairs in it. A
meeting will be held in the near fu-
ture to lay plans for the spring ac-
tivities.
Have They. Tagged
You C. 0. D.- Yet?
In the shape of little yellow cards
attached to students, and bearing the
occult letters C. O. D., a dark mystery
is stalking about the campus.
Can this be a new departure in fra-
ternity pledge buttons? Impossible,
Watson, Impossible.
We generally attach C. O. D. to the
yell for succor we send home viaWest-
ern Union about J-Hop time. But why
should it be tied to a student, we won-
der.
UNIVERSITY HEADS
LEAVE FOR EAST
President Harry B. Hutchins and
Regent Junius E. Beal will leave this
afternoon for Boston where they will
attend the annual meeting of the New
England Alumni association to be
held Saturday, March 8. President
Hutchins will speak at the *dinner
which is to be given in the evening.
The committee in charge of this
year's meeting announced that the
dinner will be informal and a stag af-
fair, their opinion being that through
this informality a tryout would be
had for awakening more interest and
Michigan spirit in each alumnus. The
committee was dissatisfied with the
formal dinners of previous years. The
Michigan alumnae ' are planning to
hold their meeting in the afternoon
of March 8.
The New England branch of the
Beta Theta Pi national fraternity will
meet Friday, March 7, in Boston. This
time was selected so that Regent Beal,
as a member, and President Hutchins,,
as an honorary guest, could attend.
ANNOUNCE TRYOUTS
FOR ORATORICAL
Tryouts for the preliminaries of the
Northern Oratorical league contest are
announced as follows: M. G. Bastedo,
'19; M. W. Budd, '19; K. Guilfoil, '20L;
A. M. Hoelzle, '19; I. H. New, '19; M.
Paris, '19; H. Parzen, '19; E. .
Brinkman, '20; C. G. Brandt, '21L; E.
W. Dunn, '20; I. E. Gratton, '20; C. E.
Lott, '21L; M. S. Lu, '20; J. K. Pollock,

'20; H. C. Tung, '20; S. Yonomoto,
'20E; A. E. Beckham, '21; C. R. Fitz-
patrick, '21; E. Miles, '21; D. C. Shel-
ton, '21; S. Shetzer, '21.
Since there will be only one set of
judges for thought and composition as
well as delivery, the solejudgment will
lie with them at the time when the
orations are given. The judges will
he members of the oratory department
and an equal number of other faculty
_ embers and outsiders. A complete
list of them will be published in a lat-
er issue.
Union Open for Engagements
All persons desiring information
concerning banquet or meeting room
accommodations in the new Union
building should see the steward, Den-
nis L. Donovan. Mr. Donovan has
charge of the building and his date
book is well dotted with the names of
many organizations that have engaged
places there to hold their meetings.

CONGRESS HRTINS
RAILROADCONTROL
Roads to Finance Themselves for Few
Months with Loans on Open
Market
OFFICIALS PLAN TO KEEP
LINES OFF MONEY MARKET
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 5.-The govern-
ment today determined to retain con-
trol of the railroads despite failure
of congress to provide funds for the
railroad administration and to have
the roads finance themelves for the
next few months through private loans
on the open market or through ad-
vances by the War Finance corpora-
tion.
Efforts will be made to maintain
operations on a normal scale and to
carry on as much of the improvement
program as possible in order to avoid
throwing employes out of work or
otherwise disturbing industrial con-
ditions. No attempts will be made to
solve the"problem by raising rates.
These assurances were given by
Director General Hines in a public
statement and in an address to the
conference of the governors and may-
ors meeting here. At the same tim,
it developed that the War Finance
corporation has about $337,000,000
available, and much of this may go
to railroads to supplement the sums
they can bortrow until congress meets
again and has opportunity to appro-
priate funds.
After protracted conferences be-
tween Secretary Glass and other of-
ficials of the Treasury and War Fi-
nance corporation, it was stated that
means probably would be developed
to keep, the railroads off the money
market as much as possible and mini-
mize interference with the torthcom-
ing Victory Liberty Loan.
Although officials appeared optimis-
tic they explained that much manip-
ulating of financial machinery would
be necesary and a definite program
could not be developed for some
time.
Scheme toTrc
rather Time Holds
* *
"Time waits for no man," has been
an accepted adage for years. But late-
ly they have certainly attempted to try
and stretch it out by making daytime
out of nighttime and vice versa.
Congress failed before its dismissal
to take any action upon repealing the
"More daylight" plan. There was
much opposition to this new move-
ment from the people of rural dis-
tricts who did not need the extra hour
of daylight.
As it stands the nation's clocks will
be advanced an hour some time be-
tween the last Sunday in March and
the last Sunday in October.
TEACHER AND STUDENT
ADDED TO FRENCH FACULTY
Two important additions have been
made to the faculty of the French
department, Mr. Philip E. Bursley and
Harold L. Humphreys, '16, having re-
turned as instructors. Since April,
1918, Mr. Bursley has been assisting
Prof. Charles B. Vibbert, head of the
University bureau at the American
University Union in Paris. He re-

turned to the University last week.
Mr. Humphreys entered the graduate
school at Princeton university imme-
diately after graduation. He went
across with the Princeton ambulance
unit and for the past two years has
been with the French army.
CHICAGO LOSES COURT TITLE
Chicago, Mach 5.--Chicago lost hon-
ors in the Western Conference basket-
ball race to Minnesota by losing to
Northwestern, 15 to 12, tonight in
Bartlett gymnasium.
Union Dances Continue in Favor
The regular Friday and Saturday
night membership dances of the
Union will be held this week. The
new Union house orchestra surprised
even the most expectant last Satur-
day night, and it added much enthu-
siasm to the dance. Tickets for the
dance are on sale at the Union desk.

MR. F. H. RINGE WHO TALKS AT
HILL AUDITORIUM TONIGHT.
ADVOATEOf INDUSTRY
TO TALK ON ENINEEING.
COMES UNDER ENGINEERING AND
COMMERCE CLUB
AUSPICES
As leader of the industrial move-
ment for the national Y. M. C. A.,
Mr. Fred H. Rindge, who speaks at
7:30 o'clock tomorrow night in Hill
auditorium on "The Human Side of
Engineering," has been responsible for
the enlistment of several thousand
college men in industrial work for the
laboring man. His lecture is given
under the joint auspices of the En-
gineering society and the Commerce
clubs of the University.
Double Appeal
Dealing directly with the human ele-
ment of industry, Mr. Rijdge pre-
sents a double appeal in his lecture,
an appeal which reaches from both
the technical and theoretical side of
the subject.
Speaking last night before the busi-
ness men of Ann Arbor at the city
Y. M. C. A. Mr. Rindge emphasized the
fact that the one hope for modern in-
dustry was the combination of the
capitalist and the working man, and
he voiced the opinion that this had been
made possible to a great extent by
the better relations of these classes
arising from the great war.
Series of Lectures
Mr. Rindge also spoke before the
freshman engineer assembly yesterday
morning. Today he will lecture be-
fore the three upper class engineer
assemblies and to classes in economics
and sociology.
Co-operating with Mr. Rindge in his
work here is Mr. T. C. Evans, a mem-
ber of the national Y. M. C. A. indus-
trial department.
WOMEN DEBATERS
MAKE SELECTIONS
Membership tryouts for Athena liter-
ary society were held Tuesday evening
in room 302, Mason hall. The regular
meting of, the society followed imme-
diately after, and the following were
elected to membership: Virginia Mau-
rie, '22, Elsie Townsend, '22, Gladys
Boughton, '20, Dorothy Winchell, '21,
Sarah Caplan, '21, Florence Fogg, '19,
Jane Gartland, '21, Flanche Flynn, '20,
Eliza McRaub, '21, Ellen Lardner, '20,
Amelia Igel, '21, Euphemia Carnahan,
'22, Miss Rice, '21, and Miss Stein-
berg, '22.
Each of these contestants delivered
a three-minute speech deemed by the
society members as being of sufficient
merit to extend to them membership.
BOLSHEVIKI FORCE BOURGEOIS
TO BUNK IN SLUM DISTRICT
Warsaw, March 4.-Strong forces of
Bolsheviki continue active in Ukrania.
They still hold Kiev Where they are
reported to have forced the bourgeois
class to exchange houses with the
population of the slums and ghetto
quarter of the town.
A large detachment of Ukranians is
holding the Bolsheviki south of the
Kiev-Kopel railway line, but the whole
of this land is reported to be in the
hands of the Bolshevik forces. Odessa
and a small belt of territory around
that city Is at present held by French

troops.,

J-LIT NOMINATIONS
DECIDED BY WOMEN
Two women students, arriving at
the close of the junior lit elections
yesterday afternoon, decided the tie
and effected the nominations of Harry
Carey, '20, G. D. Anderson, '20, and
William W. Hinshaw, Jr., '20, as stu-
dent councilmen.
Two of these men will be chosen at
the final election to be held at 3:15
o'clock Monday afternoon in room
205, Mason hall.
The meeting yesterday was attend-
ed by approximately 50 members of
the junior class. Until the close of
the elections when the tellers were
about to announce the results, there
was not a woman in the room. In
the light of past elections where com-
paratively large bodies of female pol-
iticians have voted solidly, often for a
member of their own sex, the women's
small representation at the meeting
yesterday caused considerale com-
ment.
Give Directions
T o Secure Jonus
To obtain the $60 bonus recently an-
nounced by the war department for
men who have received honorable dis-
charge from the military service of the
United States it is necessary to write
at once to the zone finance officer,
Lemon building, Washington, D. C.
According to Major Ralph Durkee,
all that is necessary to secure the $60
bonus is to mail to the zone officer, an
honorable discharge, and upon a sepa-
rate piece of paper add the request for
the bonus, and address. All informa-
tion required by the government can
be found on the back of the honorable
discharge.
Persons who have lost their honor-
able discharge may still secure their
bonus by following the directions giv-
en in army regulations, section 151,
which reads:
"Upon satisfactory proof of the loss
or destruction of a discharge certifi-
cate, without the fault of the person
entitled to it, the war department may
issue to such person, a certificate of
service, showing date of enlistment in
and discharge from the army, and
character given on discharge certifi-
cate. An application for certificate
in lieu of lost, or destroyed discharge
certificate will be forwarded by the
applicant's (immediate conmanding
officer, directly to the adjutant gen-
eral of the army * **"
COMEDY CLUB TO
HAVE ACTIVE YEAR
"Owing to the lack of activity in dra-
matics during the past year, students
have returned with a new interest in
this field," declared Prof. R. D. T. Hol-
lister, of the oratory department, yes-
terday in regard to this year's Comedy
club play. "For this reason and be-
cause there is to be no Oratorical as-
sociation play, the production should
be a great success."
Professor Hollister has been secured
to direct the play this year since he
will not be occupied with the Oratori-
cal production as in former years. The
club membership this year embraces
several old members of experience, but
there is still room for omre. Conse-
quently, annual tryouts will be held
from 9 to 12 o'clock Saturday morn-
ing in University hall. Students of all
classes and departments are eligible,
and it is suggested they come prepared
to give some short reading although

this is not absolutely necessary.
EXPLAIN MENTOR SYSTEM AT
FIRST FRESH ENG. ASSEMBLY
Freshman engineers held their first
class assembly on Wednesday in room
348 engineering building. Prof. Wil-
liam C. Hoad, class mentor, explained
the purpose of class assemblies, and
emphasized the purpose of the mentor
system. Frederick H. Rindge of Co-
lumbia university outlined the speech
which he will deliver Friday night, in
Hill auditorium, on "The Human Side
of Engineering."
Dr. C. V. Kent Resumes Work
Dr. C. V. Kent will resume his work
in the physics department after a
leave of absence since last June.
Dr. Kent has been doing special
work in pyrometry under the direc-
tion of the technical staff of the ord-
nance department with Major A. E.
White, formerly of this University.

BARONESS HUARD
TO TELL OF YEAR
AMONG FIGHTERS
LECTURE TO INCLUDE INCIDENTS
Hospital for French
OROUS NATURE
ACTUAL PHOTOGRAPHS
TO BE ADDED FEATURE
Proceeds to Go to Maintenance of
Hospita lifor French
Wounded
Views of the scenes of terrific
fighting in France, such as Chateau
Thierry, Soissons, and other places
near the front lines, will be shown by
Baroness Huard in her lecture at 8
o'clock Thursday evening at Hill aud-
itorium on the subject, "My Yea
Among the Fighters."
When these actual photographs are
being shown, the baroness will tell
of the incidents which happened
around these places. This will make
her lecture all the more graphic, for
she comes to Ann Arbor with a repu-
tation as being a wonderful speaker.
Baroness Huard delivers her mess-
age of crippled France with a frank-
ness which cuts deep. Vividly she
tells of incidents both tragic and
humorous which hold her listeners
to her last word.
The money which is raised goes to
the maintenance of Hospital 232 which
is caring for the French wounded.
MAY RINSTATE WAR RISK,
INSOUNCE UNDER RULES,
PREMIUMS SHOULD BE PAID $1
DAYS FOLLOWING DIS-
CHARGE 4
War Risk insurances that have laps-
ed through the non-payment of pre-
miums may be reinstated up to June
30, 1919, upon complying with certain
rules.
May Reinstate Later
Premiums should be paid 31 days
after discharge from active military
service. Persons failing to do this
may reinstate his policy two months
in which his payment was due, by
sending an application to the War-
Risk bureau accompanied by a sign-
ed statement that the applicant's
health is as good as in the month in
which his premium was due.
Should the payments lapse for a
period of time subsequent to two
months and before the expiration of
five months, the application for re-
instatement should be accomnpanied
by a signed statement from the appli-
cant that his health is in as good a
condition as in the month following
his discharge and a formal report of
examination by a reputable physician.
May Reduce Amonnt
If men have taken out an insurance
larger than they can carry they may
reduce it by applying to the insur-
ance section bureau of the War Risk
insurance, Washington, D. C.

MENORAH SOCIETY
HOLDS FIRST MEET
Enthusiasm in a marked degree was
shown at the meeting of the Menorah
society last night in Lane hall when
it convened for its first meeting of
the collegiate year 1918-19.
Plans were formulated at the meet-
ing to hold several circle meetings
every week to be supplemented by a
regular meeting of the society every
other Sunday. Accordingly, the Zion-
ist circle will meet at 7 o'clock Thurs-
day night in the red room, Lane hall;
the reading circle at 8 o'clock tonight,
same place; and the Bible circle at 7
o'clock Friday night, same place. Tem-
porary chairmen were appointed at
the meeting to supervise the circles.
Herman A. August, '19-'21L, was
elected president of the society to take
the place of the former president who
has nct returned to the University.

J-ENGINEERS MEET TODAY

Junior engineers have
regular class meeting
Q'clock this morning in
348 lngineering building.
ness to come before the
will include the election

their
at 9
room
Busi-
class
of a

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