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March 05, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-05

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY; PROBABLY
SNOWI

LL

46P
t an,

1Iait g

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WINS
SERVICE

VOL XXIX. No. 107. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

_ ,_"

DIRECTOR SELECTS
*- FNAL CAST FOR
"COME ON DAD"
ELIGIBILITY COMMITTEE DROPS'
SEVERAL NAMES FROM
FIRST SELECTION
E. M. SHUTER CONSIDERS
SECOND CAST BETTER
Abundance of Material Makes Task
of Filling Vacancies
Easy
Final selections for places in the
cast and chorus of "Come On Dad,"
the Union opera, were announced yes-
terday by E. Mortimer Shuter, director.
Work of whipping the production in-
to shape, and polishing up the per-
formance for the presentations the
latter part of the month, was started
last night.
Many to Pick from
Rulings of the eligibility committee
ruined the first cast selected by Di-
rector Shuter, and it was necessary to
pick new men for many of the parts.
The task was not difficult, however,
says Mr. Shuter, because of the abun-
dance of talent he has had at his dis-
posal. The cast named below he con-
siders superior to the one he had first
selected.
Some Names Not Out Yet
Changes may yet be made if it is
thought re-adjustments will result in
added strength. . The names of one or
iwo men do not appear because they
still have eligibility rules to satisfy.
These are the selections:
The Cast
Street singer, Carlos Zanelli, '19E;
S. Swanford Stokes, Matt Towar,
'19; Waiter, Cecil Rhodes, '20E;
Thomas, Broadhead, Sr., James E.
White, '20; Mary Broadhead, Paul Wil-
son, '20; Alice West, H. B. Shirk, '21E;
Mrs. Maimaduke Wells, George Duf-
field, '21; Flora Wells, Richard B.
Marshall, '21E; Dora Wells, Carl H.
Wilmot, '19;- Nora Wells, R. G. Mar-
shall, '21E; First porter, Harland
Buck, '20E; Second porter, Raymond
Corwin, '21E; Peter Grant, Robert
Dieterle, Sch. of M.; First spy, George
Rogers, '21E; Second spy, George Cad-
well, '21L; Senor Jones, E. R. Elzingo,
'22M; Artist, David D. Nash, '20;
Poet, H. C. Waltzer, '21; Musician, Joe
Gebhart, '21E; President of Aragon
A. D. McDonald, '19; First guard, Lee
Woodruff, '21. Soldiers, citizens of
Argazile, diplomats, dancers, etc.
The Chorus
Group 1-R. L. Drake, '21; C. V.
Krout, '21P; W. N. Frank, '20P; H.
E. Covert,, '20; P. E. Ringer, '21; A.
C. Heimendinger, '20E.
Group 2-H. G. Griffit, '21; H. R.
Every, '2E; W. H. Turner, '2A; E. F.
Moore, '20E; E. C. Davis, '20; T. R.
Jeffs, '19E.
Group 3-P. R. Kempf, '20; R. C.
Travis; '21; R. El. McKean, '21; G. B.
Riker, '20; T. D. Hinshaw, '21; A. R.
Wagner, '20A.
Group 4-P. T. Quarry, '19; C. H.
Mason, '20; E. A. Windham, '21E; L.
A. Lundquist, '19; G. V. Lancaster,
'20; H. Whiting,, '21.
Group 5-R. F. Grindley, '21; A. H.
Arndts, '20; F. L. Brewer, '21; M. H.
Reniger, '20E; P. P. Hutchinson, 21E;
R. C. Morrisey, '21.
ALL CLASSICAL CLUB MEMBERS
URGED TO TRY OUT FOR PLAY

Initial tryouts for the annual Class-
ical club play will be held at 3 o'clock
Friday afternoon in University hall.
All club members are urged to ap-
pear for the tryouts.
The play selected for presentation
this year is one of Plautus' comei s,
and is said to rival last year's pro-
duction of "Phormio" in humor. The
play admits of strong parts for both
,men and women, the cast being com-
posed of four men and three women.
JUNIORS MEET TODAY
The junior lits will hold an
important business meeting at
3:15 o'clock Wednesday after-
noon in room 205, Mason hall.
Student councilmen will be
elected at this time.

STILL CHANCE FOR
OVERSEAS SERVICE
"To men pf an adventurous spirit
and to the service men who want to
see 'the other side' before the great
war is finally settled up, the new en-
listment order sent to Camp Custer
should prove attractive," said Major
Ralph H. Durkee in commenting on
the opening of enlistment offices at
the Michigan cantonment. "There are
plenty of young unmarried men who
would welcome a ch'ance to replace
their brothers in the occupied dis-
tricts of Germany."
The order provides for accepting
discharged men for three years' active
duty and for those of tie emergency
army with previous active duty train-
ing for a one year period. Many men
are anxious to get in for this one
year service but hesitate to go in
for the longer term. However, Un-
cle Sam wants men who will not
have to be returned to civilian life be-
fore the government is ready to dis-
miss them.
Thei chief aim in stimulating en-
listments is to provide an opportu-
nity for those men now held in serv-
ice who wish their releases on ac-
count of families or other reasons
an opportunity of securing their dis-
charges sooner than otherwise.
hes Useful- 7Jut
Only Fotr Study
Are you interested in flies?
No, of course not. That is unless
some annoying member of that spe-
cies should suddenly ingratiate him-
self upon you. Even then, you would
only be interested in the most expe-
dient method demolishing him. This
brutal treatment, however, would only
go to show that you did ont know
the relative value of fly-life to the laws
of human heredity.
Most of the laws of heredity have
been worked out through the medium
of flies, according to a statement
made by Prof. Aaron F. Shull, of the
zoological department.
T. H. Morgan, professor of the ex-
perimental zoology in Columbia uni-
versity, during the year 1910 began
working with flies in an attempt to
prove the laws'of heredity. The suc-
cess of his efforts may be judged from
the fact that since his first experi-
ment he has kept four men employed
all the time to carry on this work.
Professor Shull, who was formerly
a pupil under Professor Morgan, has
spent much time on these experi-
ments. The results of his efforts are
adding materially to the knowledge
of heredity as applicable to the race
of man.
Flies, like human beigs, have mark-
ed differences and characteristics.
From this complex mixture, matings
are made and the results noted. "These
results have been applied to mankind
and the laws governing race evolu-
tion that may be deduced from them,"
was Professor Sull's statement.
PRELIMINARY SET
TO PICK SPEAKERS
Class preliminaries for the orator-
ical contest of the Northern Oratori-
cal league are announced for the lat-
ter part of this week and the first of
next. The preliminary contest for ju-
niors will be held at 7 o'clock Satur-
day evening; that of the sophomores,
4 o'clock Monday afternoon; and the
seniors, 7 o'clock Monday evening. All

of the contests will be held in room
302 Mason hall.
From these preliminaries two speak-
ers from the senior class will be
chosen, two from the junior, and one
from the sophomore. These will com-
pete in the Northern Oratorical league
contest which will be held March 21.
"NEIGHBORS" TO BE GIVEN BY
MASQUES; ONLY WOMEN ASKED
"Neighbors" is to be presented by
Masques at 4:30 o'clock Friday after-
non in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
Unfortunatf ly the performance willj
not be open to the general public. It
is to be given before the members
of the Collegiate Alumnae and the
women of the campus.
The story of the play deals with
Wisconsin village life and is one of
the most popular of Zona Gale's
work. Winifred Parsons, '19, will
manage the presentation.

SINGER MUST FEEL'
PART SAYS CARUSO
Personal Suffering Alone Enables
Singer to Bring Audience
to Tears
FAMOUS ARTIST NERVOUS AT
ALL TIMES WHILE ON STAGE
"There is nothing in the world worth
having that can be gotten without
suffering." That is the verdict of En-
rico Caruso. He is not referring to
the necessary training and drill that
an artist goes through before he
reaches the first rank but to the pow-
er of "getting cross," of making his
audience not merely listen to and ad-
mire the music, but to feel it.
Experience Alone Gives Command
"I can truly say that I have had to
suffer in my own life for every tear
that I have wrung from my audi-
ences, every thrill that I have made
them feel. * * It is not enough
that you sing well. It is not even
enough that you put your whole mind
and heart and soul into the part that
you try to create. You cannot really
make an audience feel and suffer un-
less you have felt and suffered the
passions and misfortunes that you por-
tray
Is Nervous While Performing
"Every moment that I am on the
stage I am so keyed up that I tremble.
I am wildly nervous. Everyone else
is, too, who knows what it means to
give the best that is in him. It is a
constant strain. If you hear a be-
(Continued on Page Six)

WILSON ACCEPTS'
President Believes Country Is Be-
hind League of
Nations
"OPPONENTS HAVE NEVER
FELT PULSE OF WORLD"
New York, March 4.-On the eve of
his return to the peace conference
President Wilson delivered an address
tonight at the Metropolitan opera
house urging establishment of a
League of Nations. Former President
Taft speaking from the same platform
also out-lined his reasons for believ-
ing that a league should be formed"
to prevent future wars.
Band Plays "Over There"
Mr. Wilson was cheered for three
minutes while the band played "I
Won't Come Back 'Till Its Over, Over
There." The President declared he
was convinced "by unmistakable evid-
ence from all parts of the country,"
that the nation was in favor of the
League of Nations.
"I am more happy because this
means this is not a party issue," said
the President. "This is not a party
issue, and not a party in the long
run will oppose it." Opposition in
the senate to the league, the Presi-
dent declared was based on the "doc-
trine of careful selfishness."
"No Constructive Suggestions"
"I heard no constructive sugges-
tions," he said. "If the United States
did not enter the league," he declar-
(Continued on Page Six)
Is. - - *3.*- *

ENROLLING IS AID
TO ALL SENIORS
Not all- the seniors realize the ad-
vantages in enrolling with the ap-
pointment committee in Tappan hall.
In doing this a senior places himself
on personal record with the Univer-
sity and the information secured by
the committee may be used as a
business or personal reference at any'
time in the future.
It is generally thought this opportu-
nity is open to literary college stu-
dents alone, but, on the contrary, a
senior in any department is privIleg-
ed to enroll at this office. While the
primary object of the committee is to
place graduates as teachers in schools,
it also is willing to enroll any grad-
uate of the University.
This personal record contains an ac-
count of all the courses carried with
recommendattbons of such professors
as the candidate wishes to refer to,
all campus activities participated in,
distinctions won, and professional
training, along with a photograph.
About 50 per cent of the seniors
enroll at this office every year and
others are urged to make use of this
opportunity before graduating from
the University.
Naval Militia to'
Swap War Stories
War experiences will reign su-
preme again when members of the
seventh and eighth Michigan naval
militia assemble at the Union Thurs-
day evening. -
An informal meeting, to start at 8
o'clock in the Union's billiard room,
has been instigated for the purpose of
swapping war stories, renewing old
friendships, and planning for a more
formal meeting to be held later in the
semester.
Lieutenants O M McNeil and J. R.

HOW HUNS INVADED
HOME SUBJ ECT OF
BA'RONESS HUARD
MADE HOSPITAL OF CHATEAU;
STAYED MID SHELLS TILL
ORDERED AWAY
COLLECTS FUNDS FOR
MAINTAINING HOSPITAL
Has Gained Favot with Audiences by
Thrilling Story; Also
Humor
How the gray waves of Hun inva
sion swept around her home, how the
German imperial staff used her cha-
-teau for planning the destruction of
the Allied armies, how later the edi-
fice was shattered by giant shells are
incidents in the story to be told by
Baroness Huard when' she appears at
8 o'clock Thursday night at Hill aud-
itorium.

WOMEN SHOW INTEREST INUIlASA WHOLE NUT
IN TRUCKS AND MOTORS IN FAVOR Of HOME RULE

I

WAR INFLUENCE SHOWN BY NO-
TICE PAID MECHANICS BY
FAIR SEX
Detroit, March 5.-Women are form-
ing' a full half of the attendance at
the Detroit auto show this week. A
tendency never before seen at such an
exhibit is that the women are more
interested in the various models of
trucks, trailers, and tractors and me-
chanical exhibits than the pleasure
cars, usually center of attraction to
them.
Wgr Time Influence
War time influences have not yet
worn off, and the women apparently
still retain a partiality for the prac-
ticality of the machine.
In the exhibit of $25 cars, however,
are numerous examples of the latest
designs in the pleasure car type. The
long rows of completely equipped mo-
tors in their show-case paint indicate
pretty clearly that the automobile
world has effected a rapid transition
back to peace-time demands.
Predict Busy Season
Experts at the show predict a busy
season for the manufacturers in at-
tempting to fill the new demands for
before-the-war products. A decrease
in prices is not looked for.
SENIOR MEDICS TO
GRADUATE EARLY
Plans for the graduation exercises
of the 1919 medical class, which will
be held at 4:30 o'clock Thursday aft-
ernoon, March 20, in Hill auditorium,
are nearing completion.
Contrary to the custom of wearing
caps and gowns this year's senior
class has decided to abolish them. A
luncheon will also be held in Barbour
gymnasium at 12:30 of that day, for
the graduates and their friends.
It is quite probable that classes
will be suspended to enable all stu-
dents to attend the exercises.
This early date for holding the grad-
uation is not due to any shortening of
the work required in the senior year.
It is caused by the fact that the war
created such aigreat demand for doc-
tors that it was planned to rush the
class through in record time. (
To accomplish this the men did not
take their regular summer vacation
but started their fourth year on July
1 instead of the regular time in the
fall and worked during all of the
summer months to complete their
work.

IGNORANCE AND POVERTY GREAT
DRAWBACK TO GOVERNMENT,
SAYS DL.FARQUHAR
"India today would reject home rule
absolutely," said Dr. J. N. Farquhar,
literary secretary of the national
council of the Y. M. C. A. for India
and Ceylon, in his lecture Tuesday
afternoon in the Natural Science audi-
torium. - Dr. Farquhar stated that the
unity and advancement of the 325,-
000,000 people of India are so re-
stricted by barriers caused by the 187
recognized languages and the various
religions that ideas of correct govern-
ment vary greatly.
Educated Classes Favor It
As regards the ruling classes of
India, Dr. Farquhar made the follow-
ing remarks: "There are 2,000,000 In-
dians who have an English education;
they are the real thinkers of the
country. The other people constitute
the middle and lower classes. The
former want a greater degree of self
government for India, but the latter,
who are In the majority, are opposed
to every suggested plan on the plea
that the educated class would shove
them farther down the ladder of ad-
vancement. The native princes allied
themselves with the lower classes and
the upper class was divided into
those who wanted local government
and some that did not want it, so a
popularvote, if such could be taken,
would result in the refusal of the so-
called home rule plan.
Poor Are Great Hindrance
"The poverty and illiteracy of the
poor are the saddest things in India,
and the country cannot be truly great
until the poor are uplifted."
English Plan
Dr. Farquhar outlined the plan
which England is going to follow in
governing India. The nucleus of the
project greatly resembles the altitude
of the United States towards the Phil-
ippines. When the now accepted sys-
tem is put into effect all the peoples
of that vast and rich country will have
their say, to some degree, in all leg-
islative acts.
Dr. Farquhar Is Authority
Dr. Farquhar spoke from the point
of view of a man who has lived with
Indian people for years and knows
them as no visitor or traveler could
ever hope to. His books on customs
and life there are widely read and
universally accredited. Dr. Farquhar
has received three degrees at Oxford
university and will return there at the
conclusion of his tour of the United
States and Canada.

L1 UG Q L V. 1K. 111G G~U ". .
Hayden, former commanders of theI
divisions, have promised to be pres-3
ent, and wish to meet all of their old
commands who can possibly be there.
War Study Part
of Summer Work
Particularly timely will be some
of the courses in history offered at
the summer session this year. Among
them will be the Great War and Re-
construction, and the history of the
British Empire. This last is of espe-
cial interest since there has been so
much lately to emphasize the amicable
relationship between England and the
United States. .
Other courses in this subject will
be European history,' 1789-1870; The
Rise of Prussia, with emphasis upon
the period 1640-1815; the Colonial Pe-
riod of American History, 1583-1783;
the recent history of the United
States; Seminary in American Colon-
ial history, 1660-1696; the Teaching of
history.
The faculty, consisting of Prof. E.
W. Dow, A. L. Cross, E. R. Turner,
W. A. Frayer, will be augmented by
Prof. W. T. Root of the University of
Wisconsin.
MEDICAL SOCIETY
ELECTS 5 JUNIORS
Alpha Omega Alpha, medical up-
perclass scholarship society, held its
annual spring election last night; and
chose the following members of the
class of 1920: Augustus Kirchner of
Detroit, Clarence A. Kretzschmar of
Detroit, Donald F. Kudner of Lapeer,
Norman F. Miller of Iron Mofntain,
and Charles N. Weller of Ithaca.
The initiation will be held at 1
o'clock Thursday, with a luncheon at
the Michigan Union.
'ENSIGN CAMPBELL, EX-'20,
VISITING IN ANN ARBOR
Ensign Chesser M. Campbell, ex-'20,
is spending a few days in Ann Arbor
on his way to his home in Sault Ste.
Marie. Ensign Campbell has recently
received his commission at Pelham
Bay, N. Y., where he was sent from
the naval training 'school at the Mu-
nicipal Pier, Chicago.
Campbell was a night editor on The
Daily previous to his entering the
service last spring. He is a member
of Theta Dleta Chi and Pi Delta Ep-
silon fraternities.

Humor Relieves Tension
Throughout her thrilling tale, the aud-
ience is held spellbound by her graph-
ic descriptions of devastated France.
She portrays te brutal atrocities of
the Boche and relieves the tension
again and again by a flash of humor dr
a comic touch.
Made Her Chateau a Hospital
Beginning with the first approach
of the hated gray lines, she tells of
the gradual advance through Belgium
and the sweeping rush into northern
France. The ever lengthening lines
of ambulances, creeping back from the
front, cmpelled ,the baroness to be-
gin her crusade of mercy and to estab-
lish a hospital in her chateau.
Orders from the French government
rather than the German shells com-
pelled this heroic woman to move the
refuge for the wounded to a place
more distant from the firing lines.
Donations Yet Insufflcient
In her travels throughout the coun-
try tr raise money for the mainten-
ance of the hospital, until there is no
longer need for it, the baroness has
won the hearts of many. Donations
have poured forth to support hospital
232 in Paris after hearing her tale,
but the funds are as yet insufficient.
The admission is only 50 cents and
it is well worth the price to hear
first hand the destruction wrought in
France by the Hun.
Many of the men of the University
who have been overseas have heard of
the good work which the baroness has
done for the French wounded. One
said that if Baroness Huard can
speak as she writes that she certain-
ly is good.
W.1. .rcKee,'i8E
is Cited For Valor
Lieut. Waldo M. McKee, '18E, still
in France has been cited for extreme
devotion to duty under fire. The cita-
tion follows:
"Lieut. Waldo M. McKee performed
his duties as telephone officer in a
very satisfactory manner. He showed
initiation, energy, and courage, in ef-
ficiently maintaining communication
under severe weather conditions at
all hours of the day and night, often
under heavy gas and shell fire."
At the artillery officers' training
school at Saumur, France, McKee
graduated seventeenth out of a class
of 152 men.
Correction of Hospital Appointments
The list of hospital interneships,
printed in yesterday's edition of The
Daily, is in error in two particulars.
H. W. Porter, '19M, has secured an
appointment in the Barnard Skin and
Cancer hospital, at St. Louis; and H.
R. O'Brien, '19M, will go to the
Brooklyn hospital, Brooklyn N. Y.
SOPHOMORES WANTED
Three sophomores are needed
to work on the editorial side of
The Michigan Daily. They
should report to the city editor
between the hours of 12:40 to
1:50 o'clock and 3:05 to 4
o'clock Wednesday or Thursday
afternoons. .

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