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March 04, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-04

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THE WEATHER
SNOW AND COLDER
TODAT

Ap 4b

tlx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 106. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 4, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

LEFT BANK OF RHINEMAY BE MADE
INDEPENDENT GERMAN REPUBLIC;
ALLIES REMAIN UNTIL REIMBURSED

All is Fair in Love and War;
Now We Find Them in Cahoots

CARUSO AND ASSISTANT ARTISTS
ACCORDED THNEOSOVATION
BY ANN ARBOR MUSICAL PUBLIC

ENEMY MUST PAY INDEMNITY
WITHIN THIRTY
YEARS
POWERS TO DECIDE ON
COMMERCIAL RELATIONS
Questions Will Be Settled at One
Session After Return of
Wilson
(By Associated Press)
Paris, March 3.-The council of the
great powers considered today the
military, naval, and aerial terms for
the disarmament of Germany, but did
not reach a conclusion. The main
new point was that enemy airplane
restriction will be rigid.
Paris, March 3.-(Havas Agency.)-
The question ,of the left bank -of the
Rhine will figure in the preliminary
peace treaty according to the Paris
editiol of the London Daily Mail, and
in certain quarters, it adds, there is
serious consideration of the formation
of an independent German republic
on the left bank of the Rhine.
The Allies, it is said, would con-
tinue to hold the present Rhine
bridgeheads until Germany completed
her indemnity payments.
In discussing the indemnity reg-
ulations as fixed by the peace con-
ference committee on reparations the
* newspaper says Germany will have to
pay a certain sum before the end of
1919 and the balance during a period
of from 20 to 30 years.
The Allied powers will decide on
measures to suptply Germany with
raw material and the manner in which
commercial relations will be resumed.
All these questions, the Daily Mail
continues, will be settled at one ses-
sion of the supreme council after the
return of Pre:dcnt Vilson.
FROSH PLAN MIXER
TO UNITE CLASS
"Get acquainted' will be the basis
of the All-Fresh mixer, which will
take place at 2:30 o'clock Saturday
afternoon in Barbour gymnasium.
The committee in charge is plan-
ning this event as a sort of stepping
stone to the big Frosh Frolic which is
to take place later in the semester.
They are anxious that every member
of the freshman class who can do so,
attend the mixer and become ac-
quainted with the other members of
his own group.
Tickets for Saturday are going fast.
They are on sale for 25 cents at
Wahr's, Calkin's, and Quarry's, and
by a few men and women on the cam-
pus.
"Y" INDUSTRIAL LEADER TO
GIVE LECTURE IN ANN ARBOR
Mr. F. H. Rindge, who is ip charge
of the industrial service movement
of the national Y. M. C. A., will be in
Ann Arbor on Wednesday, Thursday,
and Friday of this week.
Since his graduation from Colum-
bia university in 1908 Mr. Rindge has
been employed in industrial work for
the "Y" in the United States and Can-
ada.
Wednesday noon Mr. Rindge will1
meet a group of workers interested in
the industrial life of the community
at a luncheon in Lane hall, following
this with a meeting of the business
men at the city. Y. M. C. A. at 6
o'clock.
He will deliver a lecture at 8 o'clock
Friday on "The Human Side of En-
gineering" in Hill auditorium, under
the auspices of the Engineering

society and the Commerce club of th.
University.

LATE WIRE NEWS

There were those who had given1
up all hope of attending the J-hop.
There were those who had more
hope, and Smuck was buying, for a
sum payable in advance, clothing for
the next five years.
There were those whose hopes were
very high, and pawn shops were do-
ing a remarkable business in watch-
es, cigarette cases, and fraternity
pins.
Still the J-hop seemed as far off as
ever.
But Uncle Sam has taken a hand.
He has seen to it that every student

will be able to attend the J-hop. He
has said that every man honorably
discharged from the United Statesj
army will be given $60.
And now hope runs high. Even
those who had no intention of going
to the big party are -thinking seri-
ously that perhaps it would not be a
bad idea to look in.
But the army takes its own time
about doing things, and the hop is
only a month away. And that is why
about $60 will buy a perfectly good
mortgage on the future. Uncle Sam's
word is good, and the J-hop only
comes once a year.

,-

Washington, March 3.-Pres-1
ident Wilson tonight signed the
Victory Loan bill authorizing
the treasury to issue $7,000,000,-
000 in short term notes, and
providing $1,000,000,000 for the
use of the War Finance corpora-
ation in stimulating the coun-
try's foreign commerce.
Washington, March 3.-Ef-
forts to secure consideration of f
the administration bill propos-
ing reclamation of swamp and
other waste lands for allotments
discharged soldiers and sailors
were abandoned late today by1
Democractic leaders.
INDIAN REFORM SUBJECT
FOR FARQUHAR LECTURE
Y. M. C. A. MAN AUTHORITY ON
LIFE AND PROBLEMS
OF INDIA
"Constitutional Reform in India and
Its, Probable Outcome" will be the
subject of a lecture to be given at
4:15 o'clock Tuesday afternoon in the
Natural Science auditorium by Dr. J.

CARUSO ARTISTE HONORED
Miss Nina Morgana, assisting
artiste at the Caruso concert,
was initiated into the local
branch of Mu Phi Epsilon, na-
tional honorary iusical soror-
ity, immediately after the con-
cert Monday night. Following
the initiation, Miss Morgana was
one of the guests at a dinner
given by Mr. Caruso at the
Hotel AlleneL

N. Farquhar, literary secretary of the
national council of the Y. M. C. A. for
India and Ceylon.
Authority on India
Since 1891 Dr. Farquhar has been
on the foreign field with the exception
of seven years, during which illness
compelled him to return to his native
country, England. Many of his works
on the oriental religions have been
used even by leaders of various In-
dian groups as more correct, and more
interpretative of their own thoughts
and ideals than native scholars have
been able to produce.
. "The Crown of Hinduism," "A
Primer of Hinduism," and "Religious
Movements in India" have come from
the pen of Dr. Farquhar during the
course of his work. At present he is
engaged in writing a series of books
for the Y. M. C. A. to be used for edu-
cated India.
Honored by Oxford
Dr. Farquhar has received three de-
grees from Oxford university, and up-
on the conclusion of his lecture tour
in the United States and Canada'will
return to the University.
OFFICIALS EXAMINE
FINANCIAL REPORT
For the purpose of examining the
financial report submitted by the Uni-
versity to the state legislature, a spe-
cial committee was in Ann Arbor Mon-
day and took up with the University
officials certain matters involved.
The committee which was appointed
by the house a short time ago con-
sisted of Representatives Charles
Evans, Albert G. Griggs, and Merlin
Wiley. The University report was ex-
amined and several buildings were vis-
ited by the representatives.
Besides the committee, Representa-
tive J . R. Vine and Mrs. Vine, Repre-
sentative W. L. Case and Mrs. Case,
and Mrs. Evans visited the city for
the purpose of attending the Caruso
concert.
UP.. MA Y PLANS ON STARTING
UP INTERCLASS COMPETITION
During the past year interclass riv-
alrr has not been as keen as in for-
mer years. This is shown by the fact
that during the present season, no
interest was shown in interclass bas-
ketball. The coming freshmen track
meet will fur.m h the only competi-
tion in track.
Dr. May is planning for a successful
interclass baseball schedile, in the
near future. Athletes from the differ-
ent classes must display their inter-
est in this event to make it a success.

[C OF C -CAMiPAIGN GOING
AT TOP SPEED TODAY
ALL TEAMS MEET TONIGHT IN
CITY HALL; LOCAL PRODUCTS
ON DISPLAY
Membership subscriptions are in-
creasing rapidly in the New Chamber
of Commerce campaign that was
launched yesterday morning, accord-
ing to the statement of Roscoe 0.
Bonisteel, secretary of the organiza-
tion. Among those that were receiv-
ed yesterday were several from prom-
inent members ofthe University fac-
ulty.
"Efficiency" Is the Word
All teams will be working today as
enthusiastically as ever. It is hoped
that every citizen will respond earn-
estly to this call for members. "That
is what will put Ann Arbor's inter-
ests up to its highest efficiency, and
that is what the New Chamber of
Commerce needs to bring success," is
the incentive under which all teams
are working.
There will be a meeting tonight of
all teamstin the membership cam-
paign at the City hall. Mr. Frank E.
Royce wil have charge of this meet-
ing.
Manufacturers' Exhibit
Another new project goes into effect
today. There will be a manufactur-
ers' exhibit on display in the win-
dows of the stores down town this
evening. This display will show some
of the most Important and character-
istic manufacturing products of the
city, and it is hoped that it will prove
an added stimulus to interests in the
community's welfare.
The offices of the Chamber of Com-
merce are now open. Some one will
be there to take, and give, informa-
tion every hour of the day, so the of-
ficers of the organization wish to urge
everybody to take advantage of this
service.
IOUGLAS TO LECTURE 3 TIMES
IN SOUTHERN SCHOOLS FOR 'Y'
The Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas, pastor
of the, First Congregational church,
leaves Sunday night for an extensive
lecture trip through the south under
the direction of the international com-
mittee of the Y. M. C. A. Three of the
south's leading universities will hear
the Rev. Mr. Douglas talk on the
problems relating to various phases of
the university's man's religion.
The Rev. Mr. Douglas will go first
to Vanderbilt university at Nashville,
Tenn., then to the University of Ala-
bama at Tuscaloosa, Ala., and fom
there to the University of Mississippi
at Oxford, Miss., which will complete
his tour. His schedule calls for a
three day stay at each of these places.
He will be back in his own pulpit on
Sunday, March 16.
George Mason, '21, Dies of Pneumonia
George H. Mason, '21, died last
Thursday in Detroit after a fight of
three weeks against a combined attack
of pneumonia and an old weakness of
heart trouble. The funeral ws held
on Saturday afternoon in that city.
Mason, who left the University last
spring, was well known on the cam-
pus and served actively on many com-
mittees of the Michigan Union. He
aws a member of the Delta Upsilon
fraternity and a resident of Detroit.

PLAN PATOITIC SPIRIT
FOR FESTIVAL PROA
MANY ARTISTS NEW TO CITY EN-
GAGED FOR CONCERT
SERIES
ViTtory of the Allies over the huns
wil be commemorated in the next May
Festival, May 14, 15, 16, and 17. The
program of this course of concerts will
be permeated by patriotism and
thanksgiving as well as the highest
grade of musical offerings.
Most of the artists with whom ne-
gotiations have been completed are
new to Ann Arbor. Those who will
come on return engagements are great
favorites. Anna Fitziu, soprano, will
be one of the newcomers. She is sent
out by the Chicago Grand Opera com-
pany and is scheduled to appear in
the near future in important roles in
Detroit.
Lois M. Johnston, soprano of Detroit,
has been here before in minor roles.
She has attained marked success dur-
ing the past two years and has re-
cently been engaged as soloist with
the Cincinnati orchestra.
Three Contraltos to Appear
Louise Homer, of the Metropolitan
Opera company, needs no special com-
ment since she is a prime favorite
everywhere. Minerva Komenarski, an-
other contralto, will appear in Gou-
nod's "Faust" at the Saturday even-
ing concert. Merle Alcock, a third
contralto, is considered one of the fin-
est of oratorio singers.
Arthur Hackett will assume the ten-
or role in Hadley's "Ode to Music."
Emilio de Gogora, well known Span-
ish baritone, returns to Ann Arbor aft-
er several years' absence in the exact-
ing role of "Valentine" at the Satur-
day evening concert.
Dieterle to Appear as Wagner
Robert R. Dieterle, '21M, who has
throughout his University career at-
tained great favor with students and
also the residents of Ann Arbor, will
apepar in the Saturday evening con-
cert in the role of Wagner.
Two bassos, Andres de Segurolo,
and Gustaf Holmquist, both well
known by Ann Arbor audiences, will
be heard. Ossip Gabrilowitch and
Charles M.' Courboin will be of special
interest as instrumental artists. The
former is well known as conductor of
the Detroit Symphony orchestra; the
latter as an organist of remarkable
talent.
The Chicago Symphony orchestra,
directed by Frederick Stock, and the
University Choral union, under Dr.
Albert Stanley, will furnish the or-
chestral and choral background to the
concerts.
Pennsylvania Club to Hold Banquet
Members of the Pennsylvania club
of the University will banquet on
Thursday, March 13. The place of
the banquet has not been decided up-
on but notice of the price and the place
will be given later. James K. Pollock,
Jr., '20, is president of the organiza-
tion which has more members than
any other state organization on the
campus.
Efficient Fire Fighters Save Hospital
Patients and attendants at Maple-
hurst hospital received a scare when
fire broke out on the roof of the in-
stitution Wednesday evening.
The quick response of the fire de-
Ipartment and the use of chemicals
brought the fire under control be-

fore much damage to the property or
unnecessary excitement to the pa-
tients was caused.

Discharge Bonus
Becomes Reality
The $60 bonus is a reality -
All persons discharged honorably
from the military service of the Unit-
ed States since April 6, 1917, will re-
ceive it. This includes members of
the S. A. T. C.
Act Approved Feb 24
In order to get this money, it is
necessary to write to Washington,
presenting discharge papers. Provi-
sion for this money is found in sec-
tion 1406 of the Revenue act of 1918,
approved Feb. 24, 1910. It reads in
part as follows:
All persons serving in the military
or naval forces of the United States
* * wbo have since April 6, 1917, re-
signed or have been discharged under
honorable conditions (or in the case
of reservists, been placed on inactive
duty) or who at any time hereafter
(but not later than the termination
of the current enlistment or term of
service) in the case of enlisted per-
sonnel and female nurses or within
one year after the termination of the
present war in the case of officer, may
resign or be discharged under hon-
orable conditions (or in the case of
reservists, be placed on inactive duty)
shall be paid, in addition to all other
amounts due them in pursuance of
law $60 each."
Exceptions to this regulation are:
(1.) Persons who did not report for
service prior to November 11, 1918.
(2.) Persons who have already re-
ceived one month's additional pay.
(3.) Persons entitled to retired pay.
To obtain this bonus, the following
rules must be complied with:
Affidavits Required
"All persons entitled to the bonus
and who have received their final pay
will forward claim for such bonus di-
rect to the Zone Finance officer, Lemon
building, Washington, D. C., who is
hereby designated to settle such
claims. Such applications must con-
tain (a) the discharge certificate or
order for discharge orrelease, if no
certificate was issued, but both' cer-
tificate and order if both were issued,
:the paper bearing endorsement of fin-
al payment being required; (b) a state-
ment of all military service since
April 6, 1917, showing place and
date of reporting at first military sta-
tion, and (c) address to which check is
to be sent.
"When settlement is made all per-
sonal papers will be returnd to ap-
plicant with check. No further corre-
spondence is necessary except to ad-
vise change in address of applicant."
HARVARD PROFESSOR TO TALK
ON LITERARY DISTINCTIONS
Mr. Irving Babbitt, professor of
French literature in Harvard univer-
sity and foremost American scholar,
will give a public- lecture on the sub-
ject, "The Terms Classic and Roman-
tic," at 4:10 o'clock Friday afternoon,
March 14, in the auditorium of the
Natural Science building., Professor
Babbitt is author of "The New Lao-
coon," and "Masters of Modern French
Criticism," and is a frequent contribu-
tor to the literary magazines.
Poles Need Men and Materials
Warsaw, March 2 (delayed)..-Pre-
mier Paderewski has been officially
vised that Ukranians have resumed
the attack upon Lemberg, being en-
gaged in firing upon it with their ar-
at Lemberg have demanded immedi-
tillery with some intensity. The Poles
ate help in men and materials.

ii

THRONGS CROWD AUDITORIUM TO
HEAR NOTED ITALIAN
TENOR
BREESKIN'S VIOLIN WINS
HEARTS OF AUDIENCE
Caruso and Nina Morgana Sing "The
Star Spangled Banner" for
Closing Number
(By Edna Lucking Apel)
Generous encores following every
number interspersed by thunderous
applause distinguished the program
given by Enrico Caruso and assisting
artists: Nina Morgana and Elias
Breeskin, Monday evening before an
audience that filled every available
seat in Hill auditorium.
Principals Capture Audience
Three types of personality radiat-
ed from the platform enrapturing
those in the audience. Caruso was
emotionally dramatic, yet jovial and
democratic; Nina Morgana won all
hearts the moment she appeared by
her sweet, charming, and engaging
maner, unassuming and quiet, gain-
ing confidence and friends immedi-
ately, Elias Breeskin did not display
.any of the eccentricities common to
most virtusoi.
Caruso is the model of the present
generation in the field of singing. He
represents the top notch of the art.
His facial expressions in his operatic
arias showed the concentration of the
man upon his work. He gave of him-
self completely in these numbers.
Breeskin Wins Audience
Elias Breeskin is a serious, litter-
pretative violinist. He playsawithout
affectation, with a clearness and ease
of execution that shows magnificent
technical equipment. It is Impossi-
ble to find a doubtful overtone or har-
monic in his playing. Some of his
legato passages, especially In Sara-
sate's "Gypsy Airs" were so subtly
and beautifully modulated that it was
impossible to detect just when they
ceased. Kreisler is a favorite com-
poser of Breeskin as most of his en-
cores showed.
Nina Morgana Sings "Dinorah"
Nina Morgana has all the virtues
of youth, an abundant supply of emo-
tion and a freshness of spirit that is
entrancing. In the Shadow Dance
from Meyerbeer's "Dinorah" the in-
tricate stacatto passages were sung
with a clean-cut pureness of tone. Her
voice is unusual in that it has so
much body and depth in the lower
tones.
National Air Closing Number
Caruso's powerful voice rather ob-
literated Miss Morganas in the joint
rendering of the "Star SpangledBan-
ner" which closed the program, send-
ing the audience home with a sense
of overwhelming wonder.
A material contribution to the even-
ing's triumph was the masterly, sym-
pathetic, and highly intelligent aceom-
panying of Salvatore Fucito and
Isaac Van Grove.
Leave for New York
For the first time in its history the
1:30 Wolverine made a special stop
at Ann Arbor to take Caruso and his
party to New York, where he will sing
"Le Prophete" and the "Star Span-
gled Banner" at a special reception
for the return of President Wilson
from the Peace Conference in Europe.
Youngest Army Major Returns
Major David W. Shand, known as
the youngest major in the United
States army, has returned to resume
his studies in the University. He serv-

ed for about six months with the
quartermaster's department in France.
Shand enlisted in June, 1917. This
year he is a senior lit and a freshman
law student.
JUNORS MEET TOMORROW
The junior lits will hold an
important business meeting at
3:15 o'clock Wednesday after-
noon in room 205, Mason hall.
Student councilmen will be
elected at this time.

NEW STUDENTS RECALLED
All persons enrolled with the,
appointment committee in Tap-
pan hall are requested to call
at that office this week and fill
out location blanks, in order
that they may be reached every
hour of the day.

Lieut. Haywood Returns to College
Lieut. L. G. Haywood, '21, formerly
of the Royal Air force, stationed at
Camp Borden, Ont., has returned to
Ann Arbor to continue University
work. At the time of his discharge
he was acting as an instructor.

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