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March 02, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- . -

THE WEATHER
SNOW AND COLDER
TODAY

i

Ctri t. an

~Raitgl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 105. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 1919. PRICE THREE CEN

FIE[LD GOAL WINS
C AMEI -FOR MAIZE
A1,ND BLUE SQUAD
t $
WILLIAMS PUTS WINNING POINT
THROUGHERING IN LAST
MINUTES OF PLAY
CLINCHES FIFTH PLACE
FOR WOLVERINE FIVE

Wilcox for Visitors Makes 18 Out of
Their 22 Points; Passing Fea-
tures Purple Play
One field goal in the last few min-
ites of play, gave Michigan the vic-
tory over the Northwestern quintet,
last night, at Waterman gymnasium,
when the final score was made to
read 24-22. Williams, playing the star
game of the evening, put the last shot
through the ring for the victory.
Beginning with the first blow of
the whistle, it looked asrthough the
visitors had the edge on the Michigan
quintet, not only because of the size,
but because of their ability to pass,
but Coach Mitchell's men showed the
Purple players that they, too, had
speed.
Williams Plays Star Game
Despite the fact that Williams reg-
istered but two baskets for the Maize
and Blue, he spoiled enough for the
Northwestern aggregation to keep
them, from getting a favorable lead
on the Wolverines.
For the first few minutes of play,
the visitors held the edge by a nar-
row margin, but with Karpus begin-
ning his remarkable dribbling, as-
sisted by Hewlett's passing, they kept
close on count of the Northwestern
five, until Williams registered the win-
ning- count.
McClintock, hardly able to outreach
the opposing center, managed to show
better form last night than at any
time this year. He registered three
pretty field goals, after wrestling with
the Purple center, Eielson, for pos-
session of the ball.
Wilcox for the visitors proved a re-
markable shot, never missing an op-
portunity to cage a field goal, de-
spite the fact that those opportuni-
ties were made few by Williams'
playing. Out of eight attempts at free
throws, he made six of thenr count.
Heinemeyer, a team mate, at guard,
proved sone of the fastest men ever
seen on the Waterman gymnasium
He stuck to his man like a leach,
and it was only through the heavy on-
slaught of the Maize and Blue squad
that any goals were registered through
him.
(Continued on Page' Three)
TO REMOVE LAST
SIGN OF S. .A T. C.
Unsightly woodenu uads on the
campus, last reminders of the S. A.
T. C., are to torn down, according to
Prof. H. E. Riggs of the engineering
departmnt. It is planned to remove
the engineering shops to a special
shop building situated near the cam-
pus.
The engineering building will then
be completed in the form of a square
with a court in the center. This will
be carried through upon completion
of the new $1,000,000 hospital which
is to be the latest addition to the Uni-
versity buildings.
Kansan Gerele Francais Give Carnival
The Cercle Francais at the Univer-
sity of Kansas is giving a carnival
for the benefit of French orphans. It
is to be carried out as far as possible
in French style.

Cl

TO HOLD MUSICAL
TRYOUTS TUESDAY
The Varsity Gle and Mandolin
clubs are to be organized immedi-
ately and tryouts for both clubs will
be held on Tuesday and Wednesday
evenings of this week at 7 o'clock in
the School of Music.
Mr. Harrison announces that there
are- vacancies in all parts, but that
tenors are especially needed. Glee
club tryouts will be held in Mr. Har-
rison's studio. All men who were
members of the club in former years,
and who have recently returned to
school, are requested to notify Mr.
Harrison at once.
Mandolin club tryouts. will also be
held at the School of Music, and men
playing the following instruments are
requested to try out: mandolin, man-
dola, guitar, violin, flute and 'ello.
UNIVERSITY ATICIPTS
RECORD SUMMER SCHOOL'
COURSES ARRANGED TO AID STU-
DENTS DELAYED BY WAR
CONDITIONS
"The expected return to pre-war con-
ditions in the summer schools and col-
leges this year has been prepared for,"
said Prof. E. H. Kraus, dean of the
summer session, Saturday. "The sum-
mer session budget for 1919 carrying
with it a greatly enlarged program
was adopted Friday," he continued.
Many professors from outside insti-
tutions and those returning from serv-1
ice have been secured for various
courses. The entire staff for the
summer session includes approxi-
mately 225 professors and instructors.
All courses in the various schools
and colleges will be given here with
the exception of the field work of the
biological station, and special engi-
neering work to be given at Douglas
lake in northern Michigan.
The curriculum has been arranged
especially to suit students returning
from service, or those whose work has
been interrupted by the unsettled con-a
ditions rising from the war. Atten-
tion is called to the fact that new
students may enter the. University atE
the beginning of the summer session.
An abridged and illustrated an-
nouncement of all courses will ap-
pear the latter part of this week.
Vaudeville Nets=
Profit of $1,500
More than $1,500 in net profits ac-
crued from the Spotlight vaudevillet
Friday night, according to latest re-b
ports of the ticket sales committee.-
Incomplete returns make it impossi-t
ble to give an exact estimate of thea
total receipts, but it is thought that
at least $1,700 was taken in.
For the first time in history, Hill
auditorium was unable to accommo-
date all of those who came to see the
Spotlight. A couple hundred students
coming over frdm the basketball game
had to be turned away from the doors.
The succes of the show is consider-d
ed phenomenal, especially when theres
is taken into consideration the fact
that previous Spotlight vaudevilles, tos
which all Union mrem1lpre were ad-o
mitted free, have .had, audiences of
only about 3,000. a
The proceeds furnish evidence of thes

financial success of the performance,I
while the unqualified praise of all;
who were present bears proof to its ar-
tistic merit.
HASQUES TO PRESENT ZONA
GALE'S "NEIGHBORS" FRIDAYE

German Troops Marching Toward
Saxon Cities From Three Sides
Copenhagen, March 1.-A Soviet Republic has been proclaimed
in Brunswick, according to a dispatch from Berlin under date of
Friday.
Paris, March 1.-German troops are marching from three direc-
tions upon Halle, and Merzeburg, Prussian Saxony, says a dispatch
to the Havas agency from Basle, quoting the Gazette of Frankfort.
The Lertsic-Dresden railway has been cut and is now occupied
by the strikers. Five thousand government troops are massed be-
fore Dresden.
According to the Gazette Berlin correspondent, more than 130,-
000 volunteers have enrolled throughout Germany to aid the gov-
ernment. Fears are felt by the authorities that a reign of terror
is adopted'again in Erfurt, Greiz and Halle. It is reported also
that the bolshevik dangers are growing in eastern Silesia.

BARONESS' EECTURE
TO AID HOSPITAL
Baroness Huard will deliver her
lecture on "My Year Among the
Fighters," at 8 o'clock Thursday eve-
ning in Hill auditorium. The pro-
ceeds from the address will go to
the maintenance of hospital 232 in
Paris.
It is for the welfare of soldiers re-
covering and those who may become
sick that the money is given. A large
sum is paid each week by regular sub-
scribers, but this amount is not suf-
ficient to cover the expenses, which
average about $750 a day. Baroness
Huard is touring the country to raise
the needed money.
A hospital was established by the
Baroness near the firing line, but
later was moved because of its dang-
erous position. It is of her experience
during the first onrush of the Huns
anr of the subsequent fighting that
she talks.
Baroness Huard is speaking under
the auspices of the Collegiate alum-
nae.
PLANS COMPLETED
FOR ANNUAL J-HOP

ARMY PLANS LAID
BEFORLY BOAR
Germany Limited to 15 Divisions of
Infantry and Five of Cavalry;
No Air Force
SUBMARINE WARFARE TO
BE ENDED FOR ALL TIME
Paris, March 1.-Marshall Foch pre-
sented today to the supreme council of
the great powers the military terms
to be incorporated in the peace treaty.
These will be considered Monday with
the naval terms already submitted to
the council.I
The military terms provided for the
disarmament of Germany down to 20
divisions of 10,000 men each, includ-
ing 15 divisions of infantry and five
of cavalry. Severe restrictions were
placed on the maunfacture of all
classes of war materials, and the mil-
itary and commercial use of theair-
plane is limited to the minimum.
Subs Doomed
Naval terms now before the council
provide not only for the complete
suppression of Germany's submarine
equipment but also for the termina-
tion of all submarine warfare by all
nations throughout the world, thus
ending the use of the submarine in
naval warfare.
Provisions for dismantling the fort-
ifications of Heligoland and Kiel
canal is made the subject of reserva-
tion by Admiral Benson representing
the United States, whereby this shall
not be a precedent applicable to Am-
erican land and harbor defenses, such
as the Hell Gate, Cape Cod, Panama
and others.
Destruction of Warships Proposed
The proposal of the destruction of
the large German warships is ap-
proved in the reports by the British
and American naval authorities, but
the French still make reservations
against the destruction of these ships.
The supreme council is expected to
pass on this and other naval and mil-
itary subjects on Monday.
PROF. A. E. WOOD TO ADDRESS
MEETING OF STUDENT FORUM
Prof. A. E. Wood of the sociology
department, will have charge of the
student forum which meets at 8 o'clock
Sunday night in Lane hall. He will
speak upon the subject, New Aspects
of Authority and Freedom."
This iieeting will be the second of
a series which will run through the
semester for the study of world prob-
lems. Y. M. C. A. officials ask that
students notice the change of hour to
8 o'clock.
Toronto University to Aid Men
Alumni of Toronto university have
established a bureau of appointments
for the purpose of assisting returning
men in resuming civil life. Positions
will be found for them, and the bureau
will keep informed of the progress of
the men.

co OF c. CANVASS
TO, OPEN' MONDAY

I Organized

Teams to Enlist Interest
of the Entire
City

PROF. RIGGS IN CHARGE OF .
CO3DITTEE FOR UNIVERSITY
Without further delay the new
Chamber of Commerce will start on its
membership campaign in all earnest-,
ness tomorrow morning.
Organized teams will canvass the
entire city, and every man in Ann Ar-
bor that is interested in this civic
movement will be given an opportu-
nity to join.1
The committee representing the
University is in charge of Prof. Henry
E. Riggs, of the Engineering college.
The Chamber of Commerce is now
occupying its new headquarters in the
Times News building. It is hoped
that the new quarters will be in read-
iness for the launching of the mem-
bership campaign.
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
TO APPEAR IN CONCERT
The University Symphony orchestra
will appear in it's first concert of the
season at 3 o'clock this afternoon in
Hill auditorium.
The program for this concert is as
follows:
Overture to "Joseph"........Mehul
Symphony No. 4, C minor ..Shubert
Adagio molto-Allegro vivoce;
Andante;
Menuetto (allegro vivace);
Allegro
Ballet" Suite "La Source" .... Delibes
1. Scarf Dance
2. Love Scene
3. Variation
4. Circassian Dance.

JUNIORS

TO HAVE THE
RIGHTS TO 550
TTMHETS

FIRSTI

NATION WILL NOT CANCEL
VICTORY LIBERTY

All contracts and plans for the J-
hop have been completed. Two or-
chestras have been secured from out-
side the state.
Despite rumors to the contrary, the
tickets will sell at $5. To avoid the
confusion and controversy generally
experienced in past years, the 550
tickets will be given out in the fol-
lowing order: juniors, seniors, sopho-
mores, freshmen.
Decorations for the affair will be
different from those of former years.
The fraternity booths will be under
the running track in Waterman gym-
nasium as usual. Ten men may se-
cure a booth by petitioning the chair-
man. Particular attention will be
paid the seniors, since they had no
hop last year.
Only Waterman gymnasium will be
used by the dancers this year, Bar-
bour gymnasium being reserved for
a check room.
Those persons who wish to attend
should inform Karl Velde, chairman
of the J-hop committee.
Educators Assert
Cabinet R ights'
Resolutions recommending the ad-
dition of a secretary of education to
the President's cabinet at Washing-
ton, larger salaries for instructors in
educational institutions, and stricter
qualifications for new instructors in
such institutions, were adopted by the
department of superintendents of the
National Educational association at its
mid-year meeting last week in Chi-
cago.
The department, of which eight of
the University officials and instruct-
ors are members, also went on rec-
ord as being unanimously in' favor of
the League of Nations. It is believed
by the University representatives who
returned yesterday that since the war
education has taken on a new aspect,
and that this new inspiration resulted
in the adoption of these resolutions.
CANADIAN CLUB TO RESUME
ACTIVITIES IN NEAR FUTURE
Activities will be resumed by the
Canadian club soon, it was announced
yesterday. The club has been almost
completely disorganized for the past
few months, but it is believed that
there is now basis for a re-establish-
ment on a firmer basis than former-
ly. The date for the first meeting
will be announced later.
UNION OFFICIALS CHANGE
POLICY ON DANCE MUSICI
Frequenters of the Union dancet
glided to the music of a new orches-
tra Saturday night. This is the result
of a change which has been made by.
officials in the hope of bettering
dances.c
Phil Diamond's orchestra is the oneI
which will play hereafter. Noveltiesi
will feature the playing of the newI
organization.

CARUSO PROGRAM
EMBODIES WORK OF
ALLIEDCOMPOSERS.....
THREE ARIAS TO BE PRESENTED
ARE FAVORITES OF NOTED
TENOR
FUCITO AND VAN GROVE
TO ACCOMPANY ARTISTS
Nina Morgan, Tenor's Protegee to
Appear in Three,
Numbers
French, Italian, Spanish, Polish and
American composers will be repre-
sented on the program which Eurico
Caruso and assisting artists, Nina
Morgana and Elias Breeskin, will, give
at the last concert of the Choral
union series at 8 o'clock Monday even-
ing in Hill auditorium.
Lone German Writer Contributes
Meyerbeer will be the only enemy
music-writer contributing to the rep-
ertoire.
The three arias appearing on the
program are Caruso's favorites and
the ones in which he particularly ex-
cels.
Nina Morgana's appearance on the
programn with Caruso comes as the
culmination of many years' interest
In the little child he heard sing in
1904 at the Pan-American exposition
in Buffalo, N. Y. He has seen to it
that she has had the proper kind of
musical education in Italy. Through
his efforts she has been a member of
the Metropolitan Opera company for
the past two years.
Salvatore Fucito will accompany Mr.
Caruso and Miss Morgana at the piano,
and Isaac Van Grove will play for
Mr. Breeskin.
Patriotic Encores to Feature
In addition to the printed program,
as given below, Caruso will offer a
large number of encores in which he
will be included in a number of pa-
triotic airs.
The Program
Souvenir de Moscow.......Wienlawski
Elias Breeskin
Cavatina, "Come per me sereno"
("Sonnambula").......,...Bellini
Nia Morgana
Aria, "Celeste Aida" from "Aida"
........................ erdi
Enrico Caruso
Caprice Espagnole ........Chaminade
Zapateado ..................Sarasate
Elias Breeskin
Songs-
"He Loves Me"..........Chadwick
"The Wee Butterfly"...Mana Tuca
"Summer".............Chaminade
Nina Morgana
Aria, "Una Furtiva Lagrima" from
"L'Elsir d'Amore" .....Donizetti
Enrico Caruso
Intermission
Gypsy Airs...............Sarasate
Elias Breeskin
Shadow Dance, from "Dinorah"
..Meyereer
Nina Morgana
Aria, "Vesti La Giulba" from
"Pagliacci" .........Letoncavallo
Enrico Caruso -
"The Star-Spangled Banner".
Frances Scott Key
Enrico'Caruso
and

Nina Morgana
Salvatore Fucito and Isaac Van-
Grove, accompanists.
NEW UNION CALLS
FOR HIGHER FEE
Because the present three dollar
Union membership fee, together with
the profits obtained from room rent,
barber shop, dining hall, and othe
accommodations, will be insufficient
to cover the Union expenses, annual
dues will be raised to $5.00 with the
opening ofbthe Union next fall, ac-
cording to Mr. Homer Heath.
The annual expense of running the
Union will amount to nearly $75,000
says Mr. Heath. Therefore the burden
of the expenses must fall on the mem-
bership fees, which, with the average
number of 5,000 students a year, will
bring the Union an increase of about
$10,000.

LOAN

Telegrams received at the United
States treasury indicate a wide mis-
apprehension that the Victory Lib-
erty loan has been abandoned or mod-
ified by decision of the house com-
mittee on ways and means.
This has prompted Secretary Glass
to reiterate that the loan drive will
-eq pinom n li L 'pauueld s' plall eq
gin April 21, or earlier, and that it
would be popular. Mr. Glass said that
the Treasury had not determined the
denominations of the securities to be
issued, but he intimated that they
would be as small as $50.
Error Made in Announcing Tryouts
Through a misunderstanding it was
announced in yesterday's Daily that
Comedy club tryouts would be held
from 9 to 12 o'clock yesterday morn-
ing. The tryouts will not be held un-
til next Saturday morning at the same
hours in University hall.

PROF. J. S. REEVES TO SPEAK
ON "THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS"
At 7:30 o'clock Sunday night Prof.
J. S. Reeves, of the political science
department, will speak on "The
League of Nations" at the regular
evening service of thetMethodist
church.
Professor Reeves has made a thor-
,ough study of international law, and
will discuss the new project from
that point of view.
BASKETBALL SCORES

"Neighbors," considered one of the
most beautiful of Zona Gale's plays,
will be presented by Masques at 4
o'clock Friday afternoon, March 7,
before the Women's league in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall.
TPhe play will be given under the
direction of Winifred Parsons, '19. Pro-
fessor . R. Nelson, Masques dramatic
advisor, who has followed the rehears-
the
als, is enthusiastic over the work.
Following are the members of the
cast: Mary E. Overman, '19; Eliza-
beth Oakes, '20; Jennie M.cPberson,
"21; Blanche Howell, '19; Kathleen
Currah, '22; Hilda Hagerty, 19; Sue
Verlenden, '20, and Bertha Wright, '22.

First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
10:30-Communion Service
7:30-Philip Minasian speaks
The Contribution made by Armenia to
the World War

North,

22.

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