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February 28, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-28

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I

THE
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ASSOCIATED
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VOL. XXIX. No. 103. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

LEAGUE NEARING
FINAL FORM PRESS
WILSON BELIEVES
PROPOSED AMENDMENT DEALS
WITH TERRITORIAL
DECREES
STATES CANNOT FAIL
WORLD IN ITS CRISIS
Maintenance of Monroe Doctrine by
Powers Provided In
Charter
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 27. - President
Wilson desires conclusion of the Peace
treaty as speedily as consistent with
the great question involved, and ex-
cept for adjustment of territory he
believes a great part of the work is
approaching final',form.
It was learned that the amendment
to the proposed constitution of the
League of Nations which the Presi-
dent intends to suggest upon his re-
turn to Paris, will deal with meas-
ures to be used by the League in en-
forcing territorial decrees.
The 'President let it be known that
he was firmly convinced that in no
particulars does any provision of the
League charter conflict with the Amer-
ican constitution. He told his callers
that in the Paris conference he had
closely and carefully kept in mind
constitutional features and had had
advice of expert American lawyers on
all constitutional questions arising.
Those appearing to conflict with the
constitution were rejected or altered.
Confidence in the success of plans
for a League of Nations was reiter-
ated by the Presient during confer-
ences with the senators. "Its success
is inevitable," the President was quot-
ed as saying, "The United States can-
not afford to fail the world during this
emergency."
Regarding the Monroe Doctrine, the
President felt that the League's con-
stitution would not contravene it
while it provided for maintenance of
the doctrine by the world.
It was gathered that the President
believed that with the exception of the
clause relating to enforcing territorial
decress the only ambiguities connect-
ed with the League's constitution ex-
isted in the minds of persons discuss-
ing them.
RICKENBACKER TO BE IN DE-
TROIT; AT AUTO SHOW MONDAY
Governor Sleeper, Mayor Couzens and
Other Prominent Men Will Greet
Him at Banquet
America's ace of aces, Captain Ed-
ward V. Rickenbacker, will feature
the Detroit automobile show this com-
ing week,
Governor Sleeper and Mayor Couz-
ens will welcome Captain Ricken-
backer at a banquet to be given in
the latter's honor Monday evening.
Other speakers of note appearing on
the program at the banquet are: C.
F. Kettering, of Dayton, one of the
leading aircraft men of the country;
Lieutenant Harold H. Emmons, and
W. B. Stout. Abner E. Larned will be
toastmaster, and Reverend M. S. Rice
will give the convocation.
Captain Rickenbacker will arrive
Monday morning from New York and
will be taken to the D. A. C., where
he will stay in Detroit.

WAR RISK INSURANCE
Today is the last day that
former S. A. T. C. men may mail
their this months' installment
for war risk insurance, to the
bureau ok war risk insurance
department, Washington, D. C.
te.:

Armenia Petitions Supreme
Council For Independence
Paris, Feb. 27.-The claims of Armenia as placed before the
supreme council at its meeting yesterday, it is understood were as
follows:
First, Iiberation of the Turkish yoke.
Second, the formation of a new Armenian state to be made up
of the six Armenian provinces in Turkey and the territories of the
Armenian republic, the Caucasus, and also the port of Alexandret-
ta, which already is claimed by. Syria.
Third, protection for 20 years by a great power under a man-
date of the League of Nations.

CITY PGSMASTER URGES
THRIFT STAMP CAMPAIGN

APPEALTO.AN NROR
WOMEN FOR socl
STUMP SOCKS USED TO SI
OVER AMPUTATED
LIMBS

IS
LIP

MR. -H. J. ABBOTT SAYS END
WAR HAS CAUSED W. S. S.
EARLY REDEMPTION

OFI

' "Some sort of campaign must be
launched soon to stimulate the inter-
est in war savings stamps in Ann Ar-
bor," declared Mr. H. J. Abbott, post-
master of Ann Arbor, yesterday.
According to Postmaster Abbott, the
sale of stamps is running entirely too
low and worse than this, stamp hold-
ers are hastening to redeem their
stamps, thinking that because the war
is over, the government no longer has
any need of funds. This could be no
farther from the true state of af-
fairs and, although the, post office is
redeeming these stamps, it is holding
off to the limit of 10 days.
"This practice must be discouraged,"
declared the postmaster, "except in
cases of real necessity. By allowing
his stamps to mature on Jan. 1, 1923,
the holder .is realizing a comp~ound in-
terest of 4 per cent, whereas by re-
deeming them at this time, he real-
izes but 2 1-2 per cent. In an effort
to encourage holding the stamps until
maturity, the government postpones
compounding the greatest amount of
interest until the last month of the
term."
The children in, the Ann Arbor
schools, as well as a few regular pur-
chasers, continue to buy a certain
amount of the stamps. Regarding the
work in the schools, Secretary of the
Treasury Glass recently made an ap-
peal to school authorities in which he
declared it to be his "earnest request
in behalf of the treasury department
that the school authorities through-
out the country incorporate the teach-
ing of thrift in the school curriculum;
for 1919."
EXAMINATION BEFORE PRACTICE
FOR ENGINEERS and ARCHITECTS
The joint bill for architects and
engineers, drawn up zy Mr. Gardner
S. Williams, Prof Clarence T. John-
ston, and Prof. Emil Lorch, which
was introduced on Feb. 11 to the
house of representatives at Lansing,
has received the formal 'approval of
the Grand Rapids, Saginaw and De-
troit Engineering societies. The bill
provides for state examinations for
persons expecting to practice the pro-
fession of engineering or of architec-
ture in the state of Michigan.
This bill will receive the' considera-
tion of The Michigan Engineering so-
ciety which meets today in a special
session in Ann Arbor.
DETROIT WILL CONSIDER NEW
BRIDGE PROJECT IN APRIL

Responding to an urgent need, Ann
Arbor women are organizing to sup-
ply stump socks for crippled soldiers.
Committees have already been ap-
pointed for furthering this work
which is part of a national move-'
ment endorsed by the Daughters of1
the American Revolutlon and carried
on in co-operation with ser-
geant-general's office in Was- ,gton.
These stump socks will be used to
slip over the amputated limbs of the
crippled soldiers who are being
brought back to America for medical <
attention. In only two hospitals for
amputation cases the minimum .de-1
mand for a month is a thousand
socks.
"Time has not yet come for Amer-
ican women to put away their knit-
ting needles," said Mrs. William H.
Wait of Ann Arbor and state regent<
for the Michigan D. A. R. "Not un-
til every American hero who has
made the great sacrifice which brings
into being the need for the stumpt
sock has been cared for, can any
American women afford to rest fromt
their knitting," continued Mrs. Wait.
"It is but a small way to show our
gratitude to them."
Sixty-three cents pays for the dig-
rections, needles and necessary wool1
for one sock. Any ae wishing direc-
tions may get th, 4 by applying toE
Mrs. W. H. Wait, 1706 Cambridge
Road, or to Miss Martha Hills, the
local chairman, who can be reached.
at Kent house.
Florence Field, '20, chairman of thel
war work committee of the Women's
league, speaking for the women of the
University said, "We will be very hap-
py to aid in so worthy a cause, and
it is my hope that the movement will3
receive the hearty endorsement of the}
University women." Miss Field isC
planning to begin work as soon as -
the wool for the work can be ob-
tained.
BRITISH ATTITUDE
TOLD BY F. H. KENT
That it is "going some" when loyal
British subjects gladly celebrate thet
anniversary of the American declara-
tion of independence was the idea ad-l
vanced by Frederick H. Kent in his
lecture on "The New British Attitude
Towards America" Thursday after-
noon in the Natural Science audi-i
torium.i
"If a person has gone without foodc

LARGE TICKET
SALE REPORTED
FOR SPOTLIGHT
TEN-ACT BILL PROMISES VAR-
IED EVENING'S ENJOY-
MENT
"JAZZLAND SYMPHONY"
TO BE BIG ATTRACTION
Program From Good Instrumental and
Vocal Music to Dancers and
Legprdemain
If the sale of tickets can be taken
as a criterion, an auaience of excep-
tioral size and enthusiasm will await
the opening act of the Spotlight vaud-
eville at 8:30 o'clock tonight in Hill
auditorium. The 10-act bill and the
fact that the show is being given for
the benefit of the American University
Union in Paris have already proved
two potent factors in disposing of the
admission slips.
When one takes into consideration
the varied character of tonight's pro-
gram, it is difficult, if not impossible,
to prophesy what will be the most
popular act.
"The Jazzland Symphony"
"The Jazzland Symphony," compris-
ing three pianos and nine other in-
struments, gives promise of being a
successful bidder for applause. In
the same class come other acts on
the bill-the Midnight Sons' Quar-
tette, with a new repertoire; M. Jean
Petit, of the French department, sing-
ing a trio of songs in his native
tongue; and Leslie P. Gest, '20, in a
startling and mystifying exhibit of
legardemain.
Two Burlesque Acts
Seeing themselves as others see
them will be a privilege allowed to a
number of prominent campusites in a
series of impersonations by Archie D.
McDonald, '19. If the feelings of these
men are somewhat ruffled, they may
find consolation in seeing the famous
characters of Harriet Beecher Stowe
burlesqued in "Uncle Tom's Cabin,
with Variations," a skit to be present-
ed by a nine-man cast.
Musicians and Dances
Garrett Pat Conway promises a
cumber of ballads and novelty songs
to the lovers of vocal art. For those
partial to instrumental music, there
will be two acts, one a mandolin and
harp guitar duo, and the other a steel
guitar soloist, Alden L. Howard, '20E,
who drew much applause in last
year's Spotlight. James F. Sumner,
'21A, will supply the only dance act
of the evening in a number billed as
"Toosa Paaka Hula Hula Dancer." .
Plans Completed
All plans have been completed for
the vaudeville and a rehearsal held
last night showed all the participants
ready for their respective acts.
Tickets may still be secured from
committeemen, campus shops exhib-
iting the Spotlight poster, and also at
the Hill auditorium box office tonight.
ENSIGN F. F. McKINNEY BACK
IN ANN ARBOR SHORT TIME
Ensign F. F. McKinney, '16L, who
is now in Detroit awaiting orders, was
in Ann Arbor for a short time yester-
day. Ensign McKinney enlisted the
day war was declared and has been
with the Atlantic fleet since. He was

managing editor of The Daily in '15-
'16, and is a member of the Phi Kappa
Psi fraternity.
MOTHER OF PROF. A. LOCKWOOD
DIED YESTERDAY AT HER HOME
Mrs. Charles N. Lockwood, mother
of Prof. Albert Lockwood of the
School of Music, died early yesterday
morning at her home, 700 Oxford road.
Funeral services will be private.
Mrs. Lockwood was 78 years old.

Fraternities
Faculty

in
Favor

A committee from the engineering
faculty has been investigating the fra-
ternity and honor society situation, it
is understood, and will make a report
at the next meeting of the engineer-
ing faculty.
The report is favorable to fraterni-
ties, it is said, but will recommend
that cha1iges be made in rushing, with
the purpose of making each man prove
himself in scholarship and campus
activities before he is initiated.
It is believed that the report will
also show that certain honor socieies
have notbeen living up to their orig-
inal ideals.
Caruso Finally
Induced to Come
Enrico Caruso's Ann Arbor concert,
to be given Monday evening, March 3,
in Hill auditorium, comes as the cul-
mination of 10 years of effort on the
part of Mr. Charles T. Sink of the
University School of Music.
Never Away Before in Opera Season
For 25 years Caruso has been the
stellar attraction of the Metropolitan
Opera, in New York, and has been,
considered their greatest drawing-
card. Never before has he even con-
sidered leaving New York during the
opera season, and during his entire
career has made but some 10 operatic
tours. This fact has meant that when-
ever he has announced his intention
of doing so, managers all over the
country have bent every effort to se-
cure an engagement, and it was only
last year that Mr. Sink vas success-
ful in so doing.
When the "flu" ban made it impos-
sible for Caruso to fulfill his contract
it appeared that Ann Arbor was to
lose the opportunity to hear him, in
its own auditorium, but Mr. Sink im-
mediately hurried to New York to at-
tempt to set a new date. After much
trouble March 3 was decided on.
Reaches Detroit. Sunday Morning
Caruso leaves New York Saturday
night with a party of 12, among whom
is his wife, formerly Miss Dorothy
Parks Benjiman, prominent in New
York society, and daughter of a well
known banker. The party will reach
Detroit Sunday morning, and will go
immediately to their hotel, where
suites suitable for such notables
have been reserved.
They will come to Ann Arbor Mon-
day afternoon, when all will be in
readiness for the concert. Seats for
those accompanying Caruso have been
reserved in the auditorium.
Leaves Monday Night
Caruso will leave Ann Arbor Monday
night on the Michigan Central Limit-
ed, the fastest train between here and
New York. It has been necessary to
make special arrangements to have
this train stop at Ann Arbor, this be-
ing the first time it will ever have
done so. However, when notables trav-
el, and reserve a compartment and
five sections on a train, special con-
cessions may be made for them.
Very Expensive to Have HIM Here
When questioned as to the expense
of bringing Caruso to Ann Arbor, Mr.
Sink merely smiled and said, "It would
be poor business policy to make such
things public. I may say, however,
that this is a question I have been
asked time and again, and my answer
is always this. We have had to bid
against all 'the larger cities of the
Middle West. Caruso receives enough
for such an engagement as this to
purchase 100 ac'res of the finest farm
land, to buy also a first-class automo-
bile, and after having done both these

to have enough left over to take an.
excellent summer vacation. Form
your own estimate."
Interurbans will leave for both
East and West immediately after the
concert.

WOMEN'S CHANCES
IN BUSINESS GOOD
-PROF SH

ENLARGING OF INDUSTRIES WILL
CAUSE WOMEN TO FILL
MEN'S JOBS
WORK IN LAW OFFICES
PRESENTS BIG FUTURE
IDean Bates Considers Women Capable
Intellectually of Mastering
Stuft of Law
"The time will soon come when
there will be no limit to the opportu-
nities for women in business," said a
Prof. I. L. Sharfman when speaking
at the Vocational conference held in
Barbour gymnasium yesterday after-
noon. "The returning men are causing
questions to arise in the industrial
world whether women shall hold their
war time positions or not.
Women May Fill Jobs Again
"Conditions will soon adjust them-
selves in the enlarging of industry sso
that women may again fill the posi-
tions for which they showed a marked
ability during the war. For a woman
to be a success in business she must
know the functions, purpose and
methods of procedure of business of-
fice and from that point she may find
special branches that are peculiarly
fitted to her. While the University of-
fers no specific secretarial course it
presents splendid preparation for such
a buisness life."
Dean H. M. Bates spoke on the op-
portunities open to women in law and
said, "As to the intellectual capacity
of women to master the study of law,
I have no doubt. Although they can
hardly endure the rigor and rough-
ness of court practice, there are other
lines of law for which they are well
fitted.
Law Opportunity Broad
"Women have broad opportunities in
law offices in drawing contracts, wills,
making briefs, and holding consulta-
tions. The mental discipline is vigor-
ous and fits a *woman who wishes to
enter into competitive business better
than the one who has had no such
training. Law is also an aid in so-
cial and civic work which is opening
such a large field to women now."
ALPHA NUS AYS "HANDS OFF"
ATTITUDE TOWARD RUSSIANS
"Resolved, that the United States
should send an adequate military
force into Russia and set up a stable
government," was- the subject of dis-
cussion at the meeting of Alpha. Nu
society in their rooms last night The
society went on record as favoring
the negative.
A short parliamentary drill preced-
ed the regular program. Next Friday
the League of Nations will be the sub-
ject for debate.
STYLUS ELECTS THREE NEW
MEMBERS AT ,MEETING
Three new members were elected to
Stylus at the meeting held Tuesday
night at the Delta Delta Delta house,
718 Tappan.
The honor was 'conferred on the
following women: Adelaide Adams,
'20; Marguerite Rochet, '21; Celia
Girardin, '19.
TRYOUTS HELD TODAY
Final chorus tryouts for the
Michigan Union opera will be
held at 4 o'clock this afternoon
in the new Union building.
Small men are especially want-
ed.
t_

I

Ivoluntarily for you, if he has turned
Detroit citizens will have another defeat into victory for you, and if he
opportunity to consider the advisabil- is leading your thoughts for the fu-
ity of a new Belle Isle bridge when the ture, you can then realize the attitude
matter is voted on next April. In which England has for America."
1917 it was voted not to build the Mr. Kent' went on to say that the
bridge. More people were in favor of misunderstandings between the Amer-
the project than against it but it re- ican and British soldiers were caused
quires a two-thirds majority to put by small differences. They started
the matter through. It is expected with such things as the Yankees' su-
that campaigners for the new bridge periority in athletics. "Any one who
will have things pretty much their says that the next war will be with
own way this time now that the war England because of these superficial
is over and civic needs receive more differences, is simply playing into the
consideration. hands of Germany."

I U

I-

Spotli

jht Vaudeville To
Benefit of American University Union in Paris

-night

HILL
Auditor!ium
8:30 P. Me,
Admission
35c

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