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February 26, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-26

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THE WEATHER
MUCH COLDER FOLLOW-
ED WITH COLD WAVE

5k' 9flf

il
xij

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 101. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

6BIG" CAMPUS MEN
TO BE SHOWN IN
THEIR TRUE LIGHT
TAKE - OFFS ON UNIVERSITY
CELEBRITIES TO FEATURE
SPOTLIGHT
"LITTLE EVA" AGAIN
BROUGHT TO LIGHT
Lesue P. Gest, '20, to Rival Thurston
in Sleiht-of-Hand
Tricks
Novelty acts will hold four places
on the program of the Spotlight vude-
ville, scheduled for 8:30 o'clock Fri-
day evening in Hill auditorium.
Besides three instrumental and
three vocal acts, there wIll be includ-
ed on the bill a magician, a comedy
skit presented by a nine-man cast, an
impersonator, and an Hawaiian
dancer.
Leslie P. Gest, '20, who has ap-
peared several times in entertain-
ments given under the auspices of the'
Y. M. C. L, will be seen in an exhi-
bition of magic and sleight-of-hand.
Gest is billed as "The Progenitor of
Prodigious Prestidigitation" and his
act gives promise of proving him
worthy of the name. Among other
tricks, he will disappear from the
stage at the end of his exhibition.
"Uncle Tom's Cabin, with Varia-
tions" is the title of a comedy skit
which will be presented by Patrick S.
Nertney, '20, and a supporting cast of
eight members, David D. Nash, '20,
William W. Hinshaw, Jr., '20, V. C.
Krout, '21P, Charlton Louks, '20, Har-
ry Bennett, '21L, James White, '21, R..
C. Morrisey, '21, and George Stone,
Archie D. McDonald, '19, will give
impersonations of several campus ce-
lebrities in an act billed as "Lauder
to Lovell." Certain members of the
faculty are invited to be present when
Mcponald "holds the mirror up to
nature."
"Toosa Paaka Hula Hula Dancer"
is the title under which James F.
Sumner, '21A, will present his dances
from thie South Seas. Although this
is his first appearance in campus the-
atricals, Sumner has had considerable
previous experience along these lines.
Members of the ticket sales com-
mittee will be posted on the campus
walks today, and he will be the ex-
ception who is able to escape the
clutches of the salesmen. The card-
boards may be purchased for 35 cents
each, and all the proceeds of the
vaudeville will go to the support of
the American University in Paris.
Much interest has already been
shown in the Spotlight, and stores
which have had the tickets on sale
report a satisfactory demand for tick-
ets. This year the -faculty, realizing
the purpose for which the vaudeville
is to be given, have lent their cordial
support to the project.
Piaslng Program Enjoyed at Athena
Tnteresting talks were given by Ida
131, MInes, '20, Mlora B. Ellis, '20, Ida
V, Gratton, '20, and Abigail C. Evatt,
'19, at the meeting of the Athena Lit-'
erAry society held last night in Mason
hail,
The next meeting of the society will
be held at 7:15 o'clock next Tuesday
evening in room 302, Mason hall. Try-
oputs will be held at this meeting. All

try-o#ts be prepared to recite for
three minutes on some topic.
Forty waiters are desired at
the Miehigap Union for the
Chamber of Commerce banquet
.onight, according to Homer -L.
Heath, secretary of the Union.
They will report to the steward.

EXPLORER DRIFTS
BACK TO ALASKA
(By Associated Press)
Ottawa, Feb. 25.-Safe arrival onl
the north coast of Alaska on Nov. 7
last,of Storkersos, the explorer, and
his four companions was announced in
a dispatch from him today ,forward-
ed from Fort Yukon, through the Ca-
nadian Department of Naval service..
The explorer set out from the north
coast of Alaska in March, 1918 t,o drift
westward on an iceberg across the
polar basin on the theory that the
current would land him on the coast
of Siberia. It appears from his dis-
patches today that the ice cakeon
which his party camped nearly carried
them around in what might be con-
sidered a huge eddy.
The work carried out by Storker.-
sos and his party was planned by Ste-
fannson who intended to command the
party personally, but was prevented
from doing so by illness. The party
started on March 15, 1918, from Cross
Island, on the north coast of Alaska.
TWO NAVAL -RESERVISTS
ARRETED FOR BRIBERY

CHARGED WITH SECURING
"SAFE BERTHS ON
SHORE"

MEN

Washington, Feb. 25.-Arrest of two
additional naval reservists in connec-
tion with the investigation of charges
of bribery in the third naval district
was announced tonight by Secretary
Daniels.
This makes a total of six men now
held. They are Lieut. Benjamin S.
Davis and Benoit James, Ellert; En-
sign Carl Beck,, Chief Boatswain, Lord
Casey, and Frederick A. Jones.
A statement issued by Secretary
Daniels says Davis was believed to
have received $10,000 for enrolling
men in the naval service and that
Ellert was believed to have received
in addition a large number of pres-
ents for having secured assignments
of applicants for such duties as would
enable them to continue their business
in civil life.
The secretary said evidence in pos-
session of the department showed
that Casey received a total of about
$3,000 and valuable presents for trac-
ing several enlisted men on shore
duty, while Ellert was said to have
received $1,000 and a number of pres-
ents for obtaining the assignments of
applicants "to safe berths on shore."
DE PALMA'S RACING PACKARD
TO BE FEATURE OF AUTO SHOW
Ralph DePalma's racing car will be
exhibited at the Detroit automobile
show starting Saturday night, iA the
Crosstown, Garage building. The fam-
ous Italian, who is now "speed king,"
by virtue of having broken all the ex-
isting speed marks for straightaway
beach driving up to and including 20
miles, arrived in Detroit last Satur-
day and agreed that his 12-cylinder
car could be put on display in. the
automobile show. This is a 12-cylind-
er Packard that DePalma has used to
establish many records.
His recent drive on the beach at
Daytona, when he wiped out the
marks of Oldlield, Hemery, the late
David Bruce-Brown and the late Bob
Burman, puts DePalma at the top of
the heap among the automobile race
drivers and makes him, as usual, the
favorite of the fans, Depalma left
Monday night for New York and may
return to spend the auto show week
in Detroit.
Students Start War Aainst Tobacco
(By Associated Press)
Philadelphia, Feb. 25.-A campaign
against the tobacco habit is being
conducted by the medical students of
the University of Pennsylvania.
Leaders of the movement say the use
of tobaccn has greatly increased since
tCe war with Germany began.

FAMILIARCAMPUS
LEADERS RETURN
Many Former Students Prominent on
Publications and Athletes Come
Back from Service
TWO DAILY MEN DECORATED
BY FRENCH GOVERNMENT
Leaders in the campus life of the
University of one and two years ago
are coming back. Every day finds fa-
miliar figures quietly re-entering the
places from which war snatched them
so suddenly.
Many have participated in some of
the fiercest fighting of the whole war
onthefront line; others have braved
the horrors of death on the North Sea
and the Atlantic in crushing Von Tur-
pitz's U-boats.
Daily Men Honored
Two old Daily men, who have re-
turned, Thomas F. McAllister, '18, and
Clarence T. Fishleigh, '17E, won the
Croix de Guerre. McAllister enlisted
in the American field ambulance serv-
ice in 1917 and later was a lieutenant
in the French artillery. He served 18
continuous months at the French front
and it was in this service that he was
awarded the War Cross.
McAllister was prominent in many
college activities. Fishleigh was a
member of the Lafayette escadrille,
and later an officer in the American
air service.
Three other Daily men are back at
their old jobs: Harry M. Carey, news
editor in 1917-18, who was a pilot In
the air service; H. C. L. Jackson, city
editor, who was an observer in the
field artillery; Bruce Millar, telegraph
editor last year, who as a mechanician.
in the air service got to England and
France but not to the front line. J.
Ellsworth Robinson, '19, business man-
ager of the Daily in the spring of
1918, has just returned as an ensign
from Rotterdam.
Prominent Athletes Back
Cedric C. ("Pat") Smith, ex-'18, cap-
tan of last year's football team, has re-
turned to complete his course. He en-
listed in the navy and later was shift-
ed to army aviation.
Niemann, Peach, Weston, and
Froemke are among the other football
stars who have already returned or
are expected soon. Incomplete in-
formation as yet makes this list difl-
cult to compile. McClintock, another
returned football player, is playing on
the basketball team.
Leland N. Scofield, '19L, the quarter-
miler; Joseph L. Baker, '20E, a 44
man; Alan Haigh, 119E, high-jumper;
Robert Cook, sprinter, besides Pati
Smith in the weights, are track men
who are back,
Merle B. Doty, president of the Uni-
versity Y. M. C, A.last year, has also
returned. Waldo M. McKee, '18E, one,
of the best known men in his class,
and chairman of the J-hop two years
ago, is reported to be returning in the
fall,
Chester W. Clark, ex'18, registered
in the University yesterday to com-
plete his course in the Literary college.
He has been in the service this past
year, acting in the capacity of senior
grade quartermaster sergeant at Camp
Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Ky.
DISARMAMENT OF GERMANY IS
PLAN OF NEW CONVENTION
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Feb. 25.Marshall Foch, in dis-
cussing the diplomatic situation with
the representatives of a Havas

agency, said the new armistice con-
vention will provide for the naval and
military disarmament of Germany. He
declares there is no doubt that the
supreme council also would add to the
new agreement clauses colcerning fi-
nancial and territorial questions. In
that way, the armistice convention,
the marshall said, would comprisel
also the basis for a preliminary peace
treaty.

Out of Town Speakers to
Similar Organizations
Other Cities

FACULTY AND PROMINENT MEN
OF ANN ARBOR PLAN CAMPAIGN
"Civic Good," will be the keynote
of the dinner to be given by the New
Chamber of Commerce tonight at the
Michigan Union, when the members
of the University faculty and the rep-
resentative citizens of Ann Arbor
gather to launch the campaign to
build a solid foundation for the future
affairs of the city.
Prof. Robert M. Wenley, head of the
philosophy department, will speak in
the interests of the University.
Charles F. Kyer is on the program
as the toastmaster of the evening.
Allen Stockdale, of Toledo, and C.
F. Holland, of Jackson, are two other
prominent speakers for the occasion.
Mr. Stockdale for the past five years
has been actively identified with the
Chamber of Commerce of Toledo. His
work in the civic affairs of that city
will make his address of particular
interest to those present tonight.
It was thought best by the com-
mittee on arrangements to get as
many helpful ideas as possible from
the active members of similar organ-
izations of other cities. Therefore,
Mr. Holland's talk will be on the
work and success of the Chamber of
Commerce of Jackson.
Prof. Henry E, Riggs, of the engi-
neering college, feels sure that a rep-
resentative body of the University
faculty will be present,
"Places have been reserved for
over 500 guests. All arrangements
have been made and everything is in
readiness for one of the biggest, most
enthusiastic meetings that has ever
been held in the interests of Ann Ar-
bor's welfare," was the statement of
Roscoe C. Bonisteel yesterday.
The place is the Michigan Union.
The time is 6 o'clock this evening.
1 o Learn Ropes
of Griffin Wand
Griffins, all-campus honorary so-
ciety, Tuesday night guided 10 neo-
phites along the crooked and slippery
path that leads to the sacred seats. An-
gus G. Goetz, '19, football captain-
elect, led the band that captured the
members-to-be Tuesday afternoon at
the flagpole. After the traditional
march to the society rooms, and the
initiation there of the candidates, a
banquet was served at the Union.
The following are now Griffins:
Kingston Messner, '20; John Perrin,
'20; Karl Velde, '20; David Landis,
'20; Paul Freeman, '20; Carl T. Ho-
gan, '20; Charles Osius, Jr., '20; John
Kasburger, '19; Gerald Froemke, '20;
Robert Cook, '20.
PROF. GOMBERG SPEAKS ON
WAR EXPLOSIVES DEMAND
"Explosives" 'was the subject of
what Prof. Moses Gomberg of the
Chemistry department termed an in-
formal talk, delievered at the meet-
ing of the Michigan section of the
American Chemical society, held
Tuesday afternoon.
Professor Gomberg dealt principally
with developments which the demand
for explosives created by the war, ne-
cessitated: ChIef among them was a
method of reducing the time required
to dry gun-cotton, from a matter of
months to a few days. The process
has been so recently perfected that an
explanation has not yet appeared in
print,,

X50 EXPECTED AT
B O0F C BANQUET

Tell
in

of

DAILY TO ACT AS
DIRECTORY MEDIUM
Beginning Thursday morning, the
Daily will publish a list of the stu-
dents who have returned to the Uni-
versity for the second semester.
The list is designed as a supple-
ment to the present directory, and
will be so arranged. About 100 names
will be run every day, until the list
is completed.
Students who have changed their
address since last semester and de-
sire to have their new locations print-
ed are asked to bring notice of the
changes at once to the Daily office.
Ten Lit Students
Receive all A'S
All-A grades were earned by 10 stu-
dents in the literary college last sem-
ester, according to the report made
by the registrars office yesterday.
Four were men and six were women
students, the perfect records being
divided among the various classes as
follows: three seniors, one junior,
two sophomores, and four freshmen.
The individuals who received all-A's
are: Irene M. Beverley, '19, St. Ig-
nace; Bertrand H. Bronson, '22, Law-
renceville, N. J.; Stella Brunt, '22,
Hamilton, Canada; Robert C. Cole,
'19, Bloomsburg, Pa.; Edith M. Lidke,
'19, Ypsilanti; Charles L. McCallum,
'20, Alma; Ruth M. Mills, '22, De-
troit; Kenneth B. Montigel, '21; Elin-
or Mullett, '21, and Florence A. Shir-
ey, '22, Ann Arbor.
Two Self-Supporting
Two of the above named women are
entirely self-supporting, while sever-
al of the other men and women are
partly paying their way through col-
lege. Attention is also drawn to the
fact that three of the 10 students are
from Ann. Arbor. As is usual in the
all-A list, the freshmen again lead in
number, this probably being due to
the proportional large number of
freshmen in the college.
Decrease Due to S. A. T. C. \
Last semester's list is much short-
er than those of the first semester
of the two previous years. In 1917-18
there were 17 students on the all-A
list, and in 1916-17, 16 students. This
year's decrease is thought to be due
to the large decrease in enrollment as
well as to the fact that much of the
men students' time was given up to
the S. A. T. C. and naval unit.
IT'S ENTIRELY NEW
THIS JUNIOR PLAY
Who was it that first said "There's
nothing new under the sun?" He was
wrong, whoever he was. A great dis-
covery has been made. It's something
entirely new. Those who attend the
junior girls' play this year will
see it.
The cast will hold their first re-
hearsal on Thursday afternoon: The
committee in charge are very enthu-
siastic with the prospects and believe
they have found the best people pos-
sible to take the leading roles in the
play.
Wednesday, April 2, has been set as
the date for presenting the play to
the women of the campus. Seniors
will be given complimentary tickets.
Admission for other women will be
50 cents.
Science Club Hears Interesting Talk
Interesting sidelights on Sumatra
Isle were presented before members

of the Botannical Journal club at
their meeting Tuesday afternoon by
Prof. H. H. Bartlett, of the botany de-
partment, who has recently returned
from there after conducting a series
of investigations for the Holland-Am-
erican Rubber company during the
past 14 months.
Ray 0. Friesner, grad., andWilbur
Brotherton, Jr., grad, read papers at
this meeting.

FIRST OVEFIRST
BACKPERSHING'S
ORDER FORA [ E. .
ALL SAVE REGULAR ARMY DIVI-
SIONS TO RETURN AS SHIP.
PING IS AVAILABLE
COMBAT AND S. O. S. MEN
SHIPPED AS AVAILABLE
Plan to Board 978,000 Soldiers
Back by the En of
June
BULLETIN
Washington, Feb. 25. -Secretary of
Labor Wilson, after conferring with
the President at today's cabinet meet-
ing, announced that a conference of
governors to discuss the domestic la.
bor situation will be held in Wash-
ington, March 3.
(By Associated Press)
Washington Feb 25,-General Persh-
ing notified the war department to-,
day that divisions now in the Ameri-
can Expeditionary Forces excepting
those with regular army designation,
will be returned to the United States
in the order of the arrival of their
respective divisional headquarters in
France.
This was interpreted as meaning
that all divisions except the 1st, 2nd,
3rd, 4th 5th 6th and 7th would be re-
turned as shipping was available.
Combat troops not assigned to di-
visions will be returned in the order
in which their services can be spared,
and a similar policy has been adopted
regarding service-of-suply troops ex-
cept that as far as possible these al-
so will be returned in the order of
their arrival in France.
General Pershing says he estimated
the movement of troops based on ton-
nage known to be available, and on
the German shipping soon to become
available, as follows! March, 212,000;
April, 221,000; May, 248,000, and
June, 297,000.
The general said that based on
these estimated the divisions would re-
turn in the following order: during
March the 27th, 30th, 85th, 37th and
91st; during April the 26th, 38th,
82nd, 35th aid 42nd; during May the
32nd, 28th, 33rd, 80th and 78th and in
June the 89th, 90th, 29th and 79th.
ELIGIBILITY RULES MAY MAKE
CHANGES IN CAST NECESSARY
Director of Opera Anticipates no Ser-
ious Changes; Calls For More
Try-Outs
Some re-adjustments in the tenta-
tive cast of "Come On, Dad," may be
made as result of the report received
yesterday from the eligibility com-
mittee on student activities. No ser-
ious changes will be necessitated, but
two or three cast members have mat-
ters of scholarships to adjust with the
faculty.
Rehearsal of the chorus will start
immediately. Director Shuter requests
all men whom he notified to appear
for a further tryout, and who did not
appear last Saturday, to be at the old
Union building this afternoon at 4
o'clock. The chorus is expected to be

a great attraction in this year's
opera.
Persons desirous of obtaining
tickets for the J-Hop to be held
April 4, are requested to com-
municate with Carl Velde, 1437
Washtenaw avenue, as soon as
possible.

U

Spotlight
Vaudeville
Fri., Fed, 28
8:30 P. M.

BUY

YOUR

TICKET

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