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February 25, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

fBRUARY 25, 1919. THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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MICHIGAN TIES PURDUE
IN BI T COUR E

CHICAGO
BOTH

AND MINNESOTA MAY
CLAIM CONFERENCE
LAURELS

Team W L
Chicago . .. .... .... .9 0
Minnesota...,........7 0
Northwestern.. .........5 2
Illinois .................5 3
Michigan....... ......2 4
Purdue ..... .............3 6
Indiana...............2 5
Iowa-...... ............2 7
Ohio.. . .. ......1 4
Wisconsin...............1 6

Pet
1.000
1.000
.714
.625
.333
.333
.286
.222
.200
.142

The closing weeks of the Big
basketball race find the same

Ten
two

teams still at the head, with perfect
records. Chicago showed its road
strength in the last week by two vic-
tories on foreign courts, at Iowa City
and Ann Arbor.
Minnesota is now on a similar trip,
playing the southern row of teams.
Her game with Purdue last night is
not figured in the percentage column
above; nor is the Illinois-Ohio State
struggle. ,
Northwestern Close to Leaders
Northwestern continues to cling
close to the leaders, waiting for one
of them to slip. In the last week she
won decisively from Purue and Wis-
consin. Illinois won her return game
with Purdue, sending the Boilermak-
ers farther down the list. The strong
showing Michigan made in the two
games of last week-end raised her to
a tie for fifth place in the Confer-
ence race.
Title May Be Contested
The Maroons have three strenuous
games before them, invading the Illi-
nois and Northwestern strongholds,
and ending the season with Wisconsin
on the Midway floor. Minnesota has
Purdue, Illinois, and iWsconsin still to
face.
Just what will happen if both teams
close the season with a perfect rec-
ord is still a question. Followers of
the two fives are clamoring for a post
season series; but the officials stand
of the Conference has always been
against such proceedings in the past,
BILLIARD HONORS ARE TIED;
LEE IS NDEFEATED IN POOL

COACH PLANS EASY
WEEK OF PRACTICE
M. A. C. AND NORTHWESTERN TO
FURNISH TOUGH BATTLES
FOR TEAM
As a reward for the manner in
which the Varsity came through last
week-end, Coach Mitchell has decided
to give his men an easy week of prac-
tice.
Last night's program consisted
mostly of a correction of the mis-
takes of which the coach took note
during the Chicago match. The squad
will be drilled on shooting entire-
ly. They have not yet acquired the
habit of arching their long shots suf-
ficiently. This must be practiced un-
til it becomes instinctive during the
excitement of a game, and this is
what the coach is trying to instill
into the boys' heads now. Most of
the coming games will be played on
floors having glass baseboards so ac-
curacy in ahooting and a precise
arching of the long shots is all the
more necessary.
Showing Satisfies Coach
Coach Mitchell is quite satisfied with
the showing that the team made
against Chicago. He has aspired, of
course, to beat them, but when it is
taken into consideration that the Chi-
cago team which stands at the head
of the list and has suffered no de-
feats, came nearer being beaten by
Michigan than any other team of the
Conference, it may be said that the
Varsity did unusually well.
The games for the week-end prom-,
,ise to furnish two decidedly exciting
evenings for the basketball fans. M.
A. C., who plays here next Friday
night, went dowi before Michigan
once before this season but by a
score of only 19-17. They are coming
here with the idea of taking revenge
for what they consider a bad luck
game, and the Michigan boys are
equally determined that the visitors
shall be disappointed.
Northwestern Strong Rival
The game with Northwestern will
prove interesting because Michigan
was defeated by this team on the
Northwestern floor earlier in the sea-
son by a score of 17-16. One can well
imagine the aspect that game takes
on for the Wolverines.
It has been reported that the
Northwestern team, which is consid-
ered to have one of the strong line-
ups of the Conference, has improv-
ed considerably since the first game
with Michigan. But the same can be
said of the Maize and .Blue team, so
it will still be an even break wth
the advantage of playing on the
home floor with the Michigan five.,

18 DIAMOND MEN APPEAR
FOR INITIAL PRACTICE
TRYOUTS LIMBER UP FOR BIG
COURSE OF TRAINING NEXT
WEEKD
First regular practice in the gym-
nasium' brought out 18 men yester-
day afternoon. The work-out was re-
stricted to tossing and rollingsthe ball
about, tollowed by a few laps on the'
track. All this week the work will
be more or less on that order, the men
getting limbered up and in shape for
the more strenuous period to follow.
Huber, Parks, Froemke, and Knode
all got in some light work . Ed Usher
showed up to play catch for a little
while but didn't get into a suit. Pat
Pheney, the lanky infielder, who did
so much to make Michigan's winning
team at Fort Sheridan, was out Mon-
day for the first time.
Coach Lundgrenarrived in Ann Ar-
bor Saturday but has gone to Detroit
to stay until Wednesday. He will be
here for practice Thursday and ex-
pects to see every baseball candidate
at the gymnasium from 1 to 3 o'clock,
on Feb. 27.
REFORESTATION IS
TO BE BIG TASK
Forestry has played one of the most
important roles in the winning of the
war, and now great reconstruction
problems confront the leading author-
ities of this science, according to
Prof. L. J. Young, of the forestry de-
partment. The enormous task of re-
planting the devastated forests of
France is primarily being undertaken
by the forestry branches of the vari-
ous Allied armies which are under
the supervision of experts in this
work.
Regiments of foresters have been at
work constantly clearing up the fire-
scarred ruins of once magnificient
forests, now wantonly ruined by the
shell fire of the Hun, and vast tracts
of land have already been replanted
by them. Unofficial information has
been received that a few American
units ;n this branch of the service
have completed the work assigned
them and will soon be on their way
home.

Eligibility Rules
Made byLA.A.A.
New eligibility rules were passed
upon at the meeting of the executive
committee of the Intercollegiate Am-
ateur Athletic association of Amer-
ica in New York a short time ago.
It was decided to allow all S. A. T.
C. and naval unit men who have con-
tinued their work at college without
interruption or anyone who left school
to enter the service to participate in
intercollegiate activities this spring.
The restrictions were placed upon
this ruling. First, all men who were
discharged before Jan. 6, must have
reported to their colleges by that date.
Second, those who were kept in ser-
vice after Jan. 6, must have reported
within three weeks after their dis-
charge. Third, all must at least be
registered by April 1.
These rules have no bearing on the
Western Conference but practically
the same rules apply here although
no definite dates before which stu-
dents must have reported have been
set.
FIVE ANN ARBOR PEOPLE HURT
IN AUTO ACCIDENT FRIDAY

Varsity Laundry Co.

Five people were injured Friday'r
morning when the car owned by F. C.
Weinberg smashed into a telegraph
post outside of the Dental building on
north University.
The party in the car included Mr.
and Mrs. Weinberg, Mr. and Mrs. E. E.
Sleezer, and Edwin A. Wagner, all of
this city. Injuries about the face and
head were suffered by all the members
of the party, the most severe of which
were received by Mr. and Mrs. Wein-
berg, who are at the Homeopathic hos-
pital. Other members of the party re-
turned to their homes after tiieir
wounds were dressed.
Twenty-one war orphans have re-
cently been adopted by different or-
ganizations at' the University of Min-
nesota as the result of a campaign held
for that purpose.
Use the Daily to reach the students.
Four thousand students read it every
morning.-Adv.
Patronize our advertisers.-Adv.

All goods washed in soft water.
The Colors in all colored garments 'always re-
main as bright as new no matter how
many times we launder them.
The inside of your collars and neck bands as
smooth as glass.
Buy a cash card and save 10 per cent on your
laundry bills.
You will find our service prompt, and our em-
ployees courteous.
Phone 2076 or 2067 and our delivery man will
call promptly.

Saturday's Scores in Basketball ' Illinois, 22; Purdue, 17; at Lafav
Northwestern, 32; Wisconsin, 23; ette.
at Evanston.a Yale, 20; Princeton, 15.
Minnesota, 20; Indiana, 14; at Iowa, 28; Cornell College, 6.
Bloomington. Grinnell, 23; Ames, 20.
Pennsylvania, 37; Cornell, 24. Kansas, 39; Washington, 19.
A gain-
Lyndon comes out with a new creation:
"Double Printed" Prints for the Amateur
Nothing like it. Adds 1oo per cent to their appearance. Don't forget to
have your next work done at Lyndon's - the new way - You'll be more.
than pleased.
LYNDON
79 N. UNIVIERsITY Ave.
The Five Reasons-Why you
should p atronize the

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___- -
1.

CARUSO

HIMSEL

The straight rail billiard tourna-
ment which is being held at Huston
Brothers' parlor is making progress.
Mainting, Gale, Foster, and Potter
have eachw won two matches and Her-
zer, Simons, Darling, and Schneider
have each lost two. These contests
will continue this week, one being
scheduled for every afternoon and
evening until Thursday.
Lee is leading in the pool tourna-
ment, having won five games and lost
none. The only other perfect percent-
age is held by Marion, who has won
one contest.
Gale and Porter are next in the
running with two victories and one de-
feat. . McMahon has one victory and
two defeats scored up. Chrash has
won once and lost four times. The
others competing have not won any
contests. Stanch has lost but once
while Goldberg has two defeats against
him.

An increase in the number of en-
roolments in the forestry department
has been shown this semester. Three
members of the faculty have been in
the service, and up to the present time
Prof. P. S. Lovejoy is the only one who
has resumed his duties in the Univer-
sity. Mr. H. J. Andrews, formerly in-
structor in mensuration, may possibly
be back for the fall term, although no
definite word to that effect has been
received.
For service and results try a Daily
Want Ad.-Adv.
Daily advertising is profitable.--Adv.

World's Greatest Artist will appear it
Hill Auditorium, onday, March a
TICKETS $2.50, $3.50 $4 $5 (with $3 Festival Coupon $4.50, $5, $5.50, $
MR. CARUSO USES THE HARDMAN PIANO EXCLUSIVELY

r
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P p

Al Fox Joins Work of Union in Paris
Al Fox, ex-'19, and a former track
man, is working in the University
Union in Paris. He enlisted in the
ambulance corps in the summer of
1917. Mr. Fox is a member of the
Zeta Psi fraternity.

.

Go, To C

Hi.

MAJOR

&

Cc

OREN'S'

SERVE-SELF

1121 S. U.

for Wall Paper, Paint, Kalsomine, Var
ns th, loor-oi, nWax i Polsh, etc.

We do our olvn Cooking and guarantee Courteous Service
Try our home-made Pies and Cakes

Those who advertise in The Micb-
Igan Daily cater to ALL Michigan

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M.
Tel.

Saturday night until 2 A. M.
2642)

203 E. Wash.

St.

Phone 237

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students.-Adv. --

READY,

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The most complete line to select from.

AFTER WAR PRICES $30.00 to $50.00

TAILORS TO MEN
HE NRY

'713-715

N. UNIVERSITY

&C02

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