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February 25, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THE WEATHER
SNOW OR RAIND
TODAY

LY

4by A40
t

aug

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIR
SERVICE

I

VOL XXIX, No. 100. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1919. PRICE THREE CE]
a __

PLANS ANNOUNCED
FOR DISTRIBUTION
FH OF 1-HOP TICKETS
UNSETTLED CONDITIONS FORCE
COMMITTEE TO ADOPT NEW
SYSTEM
MARCH 4 IS LAST DATE
TO SEND APPLICATIONS

MUst Submit Written Fofm
Name, Class and
College

with

Plans for the 1919 J-hop are rap-
idly nearing completion, and the com-
mittee promises one of the biggest
and best proms yet held.
The date, April 4, has received uni-
versal approval, and fraternities are
already preparing their houses for
house parties. Owing to the inter-
val of orie year since the last Junior
party an exceptionally keen interest
in the coming affair is being taken
by the whole student body.
'At a meeting of the executive com-
mittee of the hop Sunday evening, it
was decided that this spring a dif-
ferent method of distributing tickets
would be used. The men in charge
of affairs have been at a disadvan-
tage throughout the year because of
their having had no opportunity to
see a hop last winter which might be
used as a guide. Because of this and
the indefiniteness of the number of
students back in the University it
was proposed and passed at this meet-
ing that all persons desiring to at-
tend the hop should write to Carl
Velde, 1437 Washtenaw avenue, sig-~
nifying their intentions and applying
for a ticket, stating therein their
class and college. All fraternities
will have to make out a list of those
goin, mentioning the class and col-
lege of each individual.
The purpose of this is to allow the
committee to apportion the number
of tickets among the various classes.-
It is believed that as in former
years there will be a greater demand
than supply for admittance and unless
the campus will comply with this re-
quest it will be impossible to devise
a new method of distribution. Al-
though such an application will be
binding to some degree, the commit-
tee realizes that it is too early for
many to be sure of what they are go-
ing to do. The purpose of this, how-
ever, is to list all those who are at
the present time thinking seriously
of attending the approaching hop. The
many weaknesses of this plan are
realized by the men in charge of the
listing, bMit they believe with $he co-
operation of the campus at large, it
can be carried out successfully.
It is to be understood that this is
not a plan which will allow those who
first get in their applications to re-
ceive first choice in the apportioning
of the tickets. Its only object is to
do away with the former clumsy
method of taking care ofthe selling
of the admission checks.
Because of the rapid lessening of
time until the prom it will be neces-
sary for all of the applications to
come in not later than March 4. "The
earlier the better' according to one
of the men in charge.
FELLOWSHIPS FOR 1919-20
All applications for fellow-
ships for 1919-20 in the Gradu-
ate School should be in the
hands of the Dean not later than
March 1. Detailed information
may be had at the office, Room
9, University hall.
ALFRED H. LLOYD,
Dean.

DAILY TO PUBLISH
LIST SUPPLEMENT
The Michigan Daily is to publish a
supplement to the 'Student Directory,
showing the name, class, address,
telephone number, city, and state of
the students who returned to the Uni-
versity this semester. It will be so
published that it may be cut out and
pasted in the Directory printed last
fall. The names will be started in a
few days.
Students who have changed their
addresses. may have the changes in-
cluded in the supplement by making
out the following form and bringing
it into The Daily office by Wednesday
morning:
Name........................
Class......................
Address .........................
Telephone No. ...............
Home City ......................
State .........................
M. PETIT INJURED IN
INTERURBAN CCIDENT
ADDRESSES CROWD'AT BANQUET
IN SPITE OF KEEN DIS-
COMFORT
M. Jean Petit, instructor in French
in the literary college, was injured
last Friday afternoon when two in-
terurban cars collided near Detroit.
M. Petit was on his way to speak at
a banquet of the Fellowcraft club, 70
Washington Blvd. He was to relate
his experiences in the war. The car
in which he was riding collided with
another car and although the acci-
dent was not fatal to anyone, many,
of the passengers were badly bruised.
M. Petit was slightly injured and
although he was in pain he met his
appointment at the dinner. His talk
was enthusiastically received and he
was invited to give a series of ad-
dresses there in the future. Not un-
til he arrived at his home in Ann Ar-
bor did he allow anyone to know of
his injuries. Since early Saturday
morning he has been confined to his
bed and has suffered considerably,
The exact nature 'of his injuries is
not yet known, but it is thought that
they are limited to bruises and
strains. He hopes to be out in time
to fill his place on the bill of the
Spotlight vaudeville.
Spoke Before Alliance
M. Petit is-to speak regularly at the
Fellowcraft club under the auspices
of the French Alliance of Detroit.
The French Alliance is an organiza-
tion formed to interest the public in
things French. The aim of the or-
ganization s tio present, every week,
French plays or lectures which will
be free to members of the Alliance.
Persons interested in membership
should apply to Mr. George Lory, in
care of the French Alliance, 70 Wash-
ington Blvd., Detroit. Two one act
plays, entiled, "Asile de nuit" and "La
Chute du Ministere," will be presented
on next Friday afternoon at the club.
INITIATION THIS AFTERNOON
TO PRODUCE 12 NEW GRIFFINS
When the chimes ring out 4 o'clock
tonight, Griffins, singing the tradi-
tional Griffin song, will form in page-
ant solemn, and from the neophytes
gathered about the flag pole, select
the chosen ones to be initiated into
the All-campus, interclass honor so-
ciety.

REGISTRATION BOOTHS OPEN
ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26
Registration booths will be open in
the various wards Wednesday from 8
to 8 o'clock. Those who fail to regist-
er on this day may, register at the
primaries, March 5.
iCtizens, both men and women, who
have not registered before the closing
of the polls, March 5, cannot vote.

While

- Hearted Support
Entire Campus Is
Solicited

of the

What promises to be the largest
and noisiest "jazz" orchestra ever
seen on the stage of Hill auditorium
will ibe heard at 8:30 o'clock Friday
evening, when the Spotlight vaude-
ville is given for the benefit of the
American University Union in Paris.
"The Jazzland Symphony," as the
orchestra has been named, is com-
posed of 12 instruments-three pianos,
three violins, two saxophones, two
banjorines, one cornet, and one drum.
The three pianos simultaneously emit-
ting their ragtime chords are calcu-
lated to produce a thunderous rever-
beration that will penetrate , to the
,farthermost corner of the auditorium.
Howard to Appear Again
In the way of instrumental music,
there will be two other acts. Alden
L. Howard, '20E, who distinguished
himself in last year's Spotlight, will
again give selections on the steel
guitar.
Somewhat of a novelty in the way
of stringed instruments will beN heard
in an act by Fred E. Motley, '22M,
and Harold T. Corson, '18E. Motley
will play the harp guitar, a rather
ponderous relative of both these in-
struments, and Corson will use the
mandolin.
Novelty Stunts
In addition to these acts, there are
to be several novelty stunts and vo-
cal numbers, all of which promise to
be far above the average calibre.
Vaudeville tickets, at 35 cents each,
will go on sale Wednesday on the
campus, and it is expected that the
cardboards will be much in demand.
University authorities are vieing with
students in supporting the show
whole-heartedly as an enterprise to
aid the American University Union.
Home Town Girl

HEADSSPOT1LGHT;
OTHERFINE ACTS
TWELVE INSTRUMENTS TO BE
IN BIG SYMPHONYTB
ORCHESTRA
TICKETS TO BE SOLD ON
CAMPUS, WEDNESDAY

PLAN TO MAKE UNIVERSITY UNION
IN PARIS PERMANENT INSTITUTION

The American University Union has been used considerably by
Michigan men while on furloughs or leaves of abseices in Paris during
the war. In the picture may be seen two well known Michigan men,
photographs of the late James B. Angell, and President H. B. Hutch-
ins.
It has been decided to make the Union in France a permanent in-
stitution for university men from the United States while touring in
France.

Is Popular

LEAGUE CRITICS
SHORT SIGHTED,
.WILSON DECLARE

Yet

WINNING OERA POSTER
DRAWN BY BACHMAN,'20
THREE COLORED DESIGN WILL
FEATURE MUSIC SCORE
AND PROGRAM
Reed Backman, '20, has been award-
ed first prize in the opera poster com-
petition. Margaret Jewell, '20, was
second. The winning poster will be
used to advertise the opera, and as
the cover design for the program, and
the opera score.
Bachman's poster depicts Stokes, as
"Dad;" with outspread palms, rebuk-
ing a chorus of gaily clad maidens
trooping across the bottom of the
poster. The composition is in blue,
yellow, and red.
Chorus rehearsals are being held
up until the arrival of the eligibility
list. When it is known what men
have sufficiently good grades to par-
ticipate, work on the chorus will start
in earnest. Announcement of mem-
bers of the cast will be made also as
soon as the eligibility committee re-
ports.
Regulfars'to Form
New Rhine A rmy
(By Associated Press)
Goblenz, Feb. 24.The approximate
date of the departure for home of two
National Guards and two National
Army Divisions comprising half of
the army of occupation, were announc-
ed today at three army headquarters.
The 32nd and 42nd divisions, known
as the Rainbow division, will leave
about April 15, and the 89th and 90th
divisions of the American army dur-
ing June.
According to plans the places of the
departing divisions will be taken by
three regular army divisions. The
force of occupation will then consist
of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and
7th divisions of regualrs. Details of
the departure of the, men by way of
the Rhine and Holland are being
worked out.
Prof. I. L. Sharfman to Give Talk
Prof. I. Leo Sha'rfman, of the Eco-
nomics department, will speak on "The
Secretarial Course for Women" at the
Vocational conference at 4 o'clock in
Barbour gymnasium. Dean Henry
M. Bates, of the Law school, will
speak on "Women in Law."
Mistake Corrected
Through an error in Saturday's is-
sue, Prof. J. J. Rousseau's name ap-
peared as leing of the drawing de-
partment. Professor Rousseau is pro-
fessor of architecture.

BEGAN CAREER IN CHOIR
SMALL CHURCH IN
NAPLES

Many a propagandist has caused
a good many more wholesome Ameri-
can girls to neglect food and scorn
sleep during the last war of ours.
Why? Oh, yes-the eternal triangle
again. They have said that La Belle
France was teeming with fair and
flaunting ladies who were vamping
the American boy to such an extent
that only a few might return to the
Goddess of Liberty and their home
town girls.
This has been proven to be about
as true as the "Me Und Gott" theory
held by a late monarch, and the proof
comes from an authority, the county
clerk, in fact. He states that mar-
riages are on the boom since the arm-
istice was signed and that his archives
show a 33 per cent increase in the
number of licenses for matrimony
dispensed by him since Nov. 11 over
the number issued during the bellum
days.
To the maid of the quivering heart
and suspecting nature this comes as
a balm and proves that after all "the
home town girl" really stands aboutj
as high with the American hero as
an "all-A" student does with thel
dean.
BASKETBALL SCORES
0. S. U., 32; Illinois, 15.
Minnesota, 26; Purdue, 21.
Wisconsin, 29; Indiana, 16.

CARUSO LEAVES OPERA
SEASON TO SINGz HERE

OF

For the first time in the history of
his grand opera career Caruso has
Leers pranted permission by his Met-
ropolitan manager, Mr. Gatti-Casazza,
to fill an engagement outside of New
York in the midst of the opera sea-
son when he comes to Ann Arbor to
sing Monday evening in Hill auditor-
ium.
Today, Tuesday, Caruso celebrated
his forty-sixth birthday. Owing to the
extraordinary care that he takes of
it the gifted Italian tenor's matchless
voice is as good as new, with all the
added richness of25 years of profes-
sional exneriece in opera.
He began his career as a choir boy
in a small church in Naples. His
father was an engineer, and, being of
a purely mechanical turn of mind, he
had little sympathy with his son's
artistic aspirations. Notwithstanding
the father's determination to have his
son follow a practical mechanic's life,
and the fact that Caruso worked sev-
eral years in a chemical factory where
he was a machinist, music so dominat-
ed the boy that he spent every min-
ute of his lesiure hours singing and
listening to music.
Finally, h'e obtained a postion in
one of the big church choirs, the ex-
treme beauty !of his voice attacting
many strangers in the church. Among
these was a noted baritone who after
finding out that the boy's parents
were too poor to give him musical in-
struction, offered to give young Caruso
a three years course of lessons. The
offer was not accepted because about
this time he entered military service
where he remained for 18 months.
Later Caruso began vocal study in
earnest and soon made his debut. This
occurred in 1894 in Naples. For the
past 15 years he has been the chief
tenor in the Metropolitan opera house.
CIRCLE FRANCAIS MUSICALE
TO BE HELD NEXT SATURDAY
A niusicale with dancing afterwards
is to be given by the Cercle Francais
at 8 o'clock Saturday in Sara Cas-
well Angell hall. The musicale was
announced in the original circulars as1
starting at 8:30 o'clock but the time
has been changed.
LANSING SENDS LEGISLATORS
TO MAKE REPORT ON HOSPITAL
Representatives from the ways and
means committee at Lansing were in
Ann Arbor yesterday looking into the
psychopathic hospital relative to an
appropriation which is to come up
before the state legislature soon.

EUROPE PINS FAITH TO UNITEJ
STATES AS FRIEND OF
MANKIND
AMERICA TRUSTED
THROUGHOUT WORLI
Slow Progress of Conference Due t
Complexity of Problems Affect.
lug Nations
(By Associated Press)
Boston, Feb. 24."Men who woul
have America fail the world in it
hope see only beyond the mere hor
zon," declared President Wilson in hi
first speech here today on landin
from France.
Critics Do Not Know America
"They do not know the sentime
of America," he said. Speaking'i
hopes and aspirations of the peopJ
of Europe for a lasting peace Wilso
said, "We're pinned to the Unite
States as the friend of mankind.
"I have come back for an attemj
to transact business for a little whi
in America, but I say in all sobernes
that I have been trying to speak the
thoughts. Probing deep in my hea:
and trying to see things that are rig
rather than the things that are e:
pedient, I am finding the heart c
America.
"I find that in loving America,
have joined the majority of my fe
lowmen throughout the world."
New World Basis
His reception in Europe he said b
considered as not a privilege to hin
self but a welcome to the 'America
people. He regarded it as a welcon
to "the friends of liberty, comi:
across the sea to see that a new wor
was to be compensated on the bas
of justice and right. The greate:
thing that I ~har to report to you
he said, "is that this great counti
of ours is trusted throughout th
world. I have not come to report c
the progress of the Peace Conferene
That would be premature.
"The' men who are in conference :
Paris realize they are not masters
the people, but servants and no me
will dare to go home after the co:
ference and report anything less thl
expected." Speaking of the slow pro
ress at the conference, the preside:
reminded his audience of the comple:
ity of the problems affecting near
every country of the world.
All Claims Heard
"What we are doing,' 'he said,"
to hear the whole case from tho
most interested. I have been stru
by the moderation of those represe
ing national claims. I have seen tea
in thep eyes of men in their pleadi
for a national ambition, but they we
not the tears of anguish, but the tea
of ardent hope. There is no nation
Europe that suspects the, course
the United States. Was there ev
such a wonderful thing before!
Converted to America
"If I were to regard the pride
feel as a personal pride I would
the most stupid man in the world.
have been searching for the sentime
tal facts that have brought Euro
to believe in us. It seems for the flu
three years we felt that we cou
make more by staying out than by g
ing in. Then suddenly the whole yv
dict was reversed. It was when th
saw that America, not onlyheld ide
but acted ideas, they became conve:
ed to these ideas."
Immediately after the speech t
presidential party left for Washin
ton.
Prof. Brumm to Speak at Montgome
Prof. J. R. Brumm will give an s
tension lecture next Wednesday eve
ing at Montgomery. He will lectu

on "Education and Life."

r

HILL

Auditorium

Spotlight Vaudeville
Benefit* of American University Union in Paris

10 BIG AC'
Admisslo

.Feb. 28

35c

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