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February 23, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-23

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I'

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PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIFE

r

VOL. XXIX. No. 99. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23,.1919. PRICE THREE CENT

MAROONS DEFEAT

I

MICHISGN 25-22
INH HARD0BTTLE
CHICAGO TAKES LEAD EARLY IN
FIRST HALF; HOLD IT
TO END
RYCHNER SCORES
INITIAL COUNTER

Wolverines Outplay Midway
Through Major Part of
Game

Team

The undefeated Chicago basketball
team came near to defeat last evening
at Waterman gymnasium when Michi-
gan fighting ,with their backs to the
wall outplayed Coach Page's men in
the second half and came near over-
coming the lead acquired by the Ma-
roons early in the first period. When
the whistle blew the count was 25 to
22 against the Wolverines.
Rychener Makes First Basket
Although Rychener scored the first
basket, Chicago took the lead in the
first five minutes of play and held it
throughout. At the end of the half
they had totaled 17 points to Michi-
gan's 11, making them mainly on fouls
and on long shots from the center of
the floor.
Coach Mitchell's five put up an ex-
traordinary exhibition of the court
game in this period and played the
undefeated Conference leaders even in
all features of the game by making
long throws. Referee Wright had an
unusual eye for fouls and called
Michigan many times, allowing Gor-
gas, the Maroon captain, to toss in
foul after foul. Both aKrpus and Hew-
lett took turns in the beginning when
Michigan was given the opportunity
at free throwing and both' were off
color.
The second half started in the same
way as the first. Michigan tossed the
first counter but Chicago then made
four in rapid succession and it ap-
0eared as if the Wolverines would
have no opportunity to carry away the
long end of the score. After the mid-
dle of the period, however, the Mich-
igan defense tightened and the Windy
City team were held scoreless until
the end of the game.
It was during this part of the battle
that Michigan proved that they were
an excellent quintet. Chicago was
lost at various moments and the Wol-
verines shot at the basket innumerable
times but with little success. Slowly
but surely, however, Mitchell's team
cut down the lead, mostly through the
repeated fouling of the Maroons and
the good shooting of Karpus who
found his eye in the early part of the
latter half. The little forward made
five out of six attempted free throws
during this period.
Breaks Against Wolverines
The breaks of the game were against
Michigan. Chicago had excellent suc-
cess in hitting the basket on long
throws, while the Wolverines' would
roll around the edge of the hoop and
not go in. In the last several min-
utes many shots were taken at the
home baskets but only one made, one
shot from the left center of the floor
by Borinstein, who substituted for
Rychener.
For Michigan, Williams, Rychener,
and Karpus starred although the
whole team, including Wilson and Bor-
instein, who were substituted in the
la'st half, played extraordinarily well.
(Continued on page three)
UNIVERSITY PROHIBITS USE OF
WEAPONS ON SAGINAW FARM
University authorities are to en-
force prohibition of firearms on the
property of Saginaw farm, according
to Prof. L. J. Young of the forestry
department. Saginaw farm is used by
the forestry department for practical
work in forestry and the use of fire-
arms upon the property would endan-
ger the lives of those students who are
under instruction in the field.
A hunter was recently arrested for
trespassing upon the farm, and Pro-
fessor Young said that in the future
any- person found upon the property
with firearms in his possession will be

prosecuted. The farm has recently
been stocked with pheasants and for
that reason the authorities are, espe-
g in11v inistant that there aha11 hA no

CHURCH TO HEAR
TRI O OF SPEAKERS
As a result of the centenary move-
ment of the Methodist church, a team
of three strong workers, Dr. J. Frank-
lin Knotts of Boston, Bishop Nicholson
of Chicago, and Miss Helen Moore, a
graduate of the University will appear
in this city. Dr. Knotts has been in
the city for several days, and the oth-
ers did not arrive until this morning.
By the Invitation of Dr. A. W. Stalk-
er, pastor of the First M. E. church,
Dr. Knotts will deliver the sermon this
morning. In the evening Bishop Nich-
Olson will speak to the Wesleyan guild
on "The Church in the Life of the
Nation." Miss Moore will speak at the
young people's meeting in the church
parlors at 6:30 p. m.
Dr. Knotts is the vice-chancellor of
the American university in Washing-
ton, D. C., and is a graduate of the
Boston School of Technology and Mt.
Union college in Ohio. He will leave
Monday for Albion and other Michigan
colleges for the centenary movement.
ALIES PUSH SOUTHWAR
DOWN MURMANSKAILWA
BOLSHEVIK COMMANDS REFUSE
TO REMAIN AT THE
FRONT
(By Associated Press)
Archangel, Feb. 21-Canadian, Ital-
ian, Siberian at Russian troops in
an offensive movement southward
along the Murmansk railway on Feb.
19 pushed forward 35 miles, capturing
considerable railway material and 50
prisoners. Severe losses were inflict-
ed on the Bolsheviki.
All sectors of the Archangel front
so far as reported to headquarters in-
dicate they are quiet. Not one shot
has been fired in the last 10 days. The
weather has been intensely cold.
Peasants coming into the allied lines
from Bolsheviki territory declare that
several Bolshevik comands have refus-
ed to stay at the front.
GIRLS' GLEE CLUB MIXER
DRAWS SCORES OF DANCERS
Good Music and Selections by the Club
Are Some of the
Features
Again the floor was crowded, again
the shoes were dusty, again were peo-
ple stepped upon, and again another
successful Mixer went down in history
when the Girls' Glee club entertained
yesterday afternoon. A limit of 200
people had been set but evidently the
doorkeepers were not made of the
sterner stuff and could not resist the
entreaties of "just one more."
Between dances, the Girls' Glee club
gave several selections. The music
was peppy and aside from .the perils
of venturing into the vortex, in the
language of the society column, "a
pleasant afternoon was spent by all."
BISHOP NICHOLSON TO OPEN
STUDENTS' FORUM TONIGHT
Opening a forum for the discussion
of world problems which will hereaft-
er meet weekly on Sunday night in
Lane hall, Bishop Thomas ,Nicholson,
of the Methodist Episcopal church,
will speak on "The Church in the Life
of a Nation" at 9 o'clock tonight at the
University Y. M. C. A.
The forum, with its open discus-
sions led by a speaker of authority on
world problems, 'has been fostered na-

tionally by the Y. M. C. A. in order that
students may obtain a more intimate
knowledge of the questions which have
perplexed the peace conference, and
which require the most logical think-
ing of the times.
It is hoped that the forum may sup-
plement the work of the war aims
course.
Bishop Nicholson will take charge
of the discussion this evening after his
lectue at the Methodist church.
"Y" CABINET APPOINTS MEN
TO TAKE CHARGE OF FORUM
A meeting of the Y. M. C. A. cabinet
was held at 1 o'clock Saturday after-
noon at Lane hall, when committees
were appointed to take charge of the
Sunday evening Forum meetings and
the Sunday afternoon vocational meet-
ings. Membership work was also dis-
cussed, definite plans to be made

SPOTLIGHT SHOW
PLANS COMPLE1TED.
Vaudeville for Benefit of American
University Union in
Paris
THIRTY MEN TO APPEAR ON
BIG PROGRAM OF TEN ACTS
Music, Dancing, Legerdemain and Im-
personations to Be Features
of Bill
Announcement was made yesterday
of the personnel of the performers for
the Spotlight vaudeville, to be given
next Friday evening in Hill audito-
rium, for the benefit of the American
University Union in Paris. More than
30 men will appear during the course
of the program, which consists of 10
acts of vocal and instrumental music,
dancing, sleight-of-hand, and imper-
sonations.
Fred 'E. Motley, '22M, and Harold
T. prson, '18E, will open the bill with
classical selections on the mandolin
and harp guitar. Archie D. McDonald
will follow with an impersonation act
entitled "Lauder to Lovell."
"Jazzland Symphony"
The "Jazzland Symphony a 12-
piece musical aggregation, will occu-
py the third place on the program. G.
P. Conway, '22, will appear next in a
number consisting of ballads and nov-
elty songs.
Leslie P. Guest, '20, a sleight of
hand artist of unusual dexterity, will
exhibit the ways and byways of leg-
erdemain. M. Jean Petit, instructor in
French,_:will follow with songs in his
native tongue.
* Novelty Skit
"Uncle Tom's Cabin, with Varia-
tions" is the name of the seventh act.
Al ia T. T-.n... ri... A VOaT7, .l..- - -

'Long Live The American
Soldier; None le tter In
World !" Toasts Pershing
Paris, Feb. 22. - "Long live the American soldier," toasted General
Pershing today at the annual luncheon in honor of Washington's birth-
day held before the American club in Paris at the Paris D'Orsay.
Herbert Hoover, Ambassador William G. Sharp,-and Admiral William
S. Benson were among the speakers.
Responding to the toast of the American army, General Pershing ex-
pressed his thanks to the American~ people for the support they had
given to the expeditionary forces.
"Whether keeping vigil in the trenches, whether attacking machine
gun nests, or performing the drudgery in the rear of supplying the
front lines, each man had done his duty," said General Pershing. "We
have felt that behind him is the sup port of the whole country. By hRV'
courage, indovitable will, and splen did organization and his tenacity,
the American soldier has turned im pending defeat into overwhelming
victory.
"I drink to the American soldier, than whom there is no better in the
world today. Long live the Americ an soldier."
"COME ON, DAD" IS OPERA TITLE;
DATE OF ANN ARBOR PERFORMANCES
SET FOR MARCH 26, 27, 28, 29

THE "DOPE"
What - The Michigan Union
opera.
Name-"Come On, Dad."
Time-March 26, 27, 28 and 29.
Place-Whitney theater.
Foibles in Garb
Anticipate Robin
In the spring~a frosh's headgear
Changes from the comfy toque,

WILL BE
WITH

3 ACT COMIC OPERA
SPARKLING LYRICS
AND TUNES

Moenu tj. tiowa'razuB, wnoscorec
quite a hit in last year's vaudeville, As he dons his pot so tiny
will again give selections on the steel And his sheepskin puts in soak.
guitar
The 1919 Midnight Sons quartette In the spring a young maid's footgear
will make its first appearance of the Must not suffer from the damp,
season in a song number. The final So she dons the great galoshes,
and 10th act on the bill will be a Then she sets right out to vamp.
dancing feature by James F. Sum- Like the robin, fresh pots and maid-
enly galoshes are harbingers of spring,
and their appearance on the campus
"Y" RESUMES ITS yesterday may be taken as an indi-
PRE-WAR DUTIES cation that Tennyson's favorite season
is at hand.
Although the Y. M. C. A. is still an Of the two sexes jointly delegated
AlthughtheV. . C A.is til anto announce the arrival of spring, the
army "Y," and will continue to be so male seemed the more self-conscious.
throughout the remainder of the school The freshman's embarrassment as he
year, it being financed by the Nation- felt himself to be the cynosure of cu-
al War Work council, the old-time, rious stares met a deep contrast in the
pre-war atmosphere is prevalent at perfect sang-froid of the sorority dam-
that institution. sel wearing her pedal atrocities.
Free movies, music, reading and
lounging rooms, and an employment
bureau are at the service of the pub- SOCIAL DIRECTOR ADDRESSES
lic. The employment bureau is flooded DETROIT ALUMNAE LUNCHEON
with more than a hundred applications
from students who desire work. Fra- Mrs. Margaret ,Irving Wallace, di-
ternities, boarding-houses, and any- rector of Alumnae residence, spoke at
one else looking for help are asked the annual luncheon of the Detroit
to notify the employment secretary at alumnae which was held on Saturday,
Lane hall. Feb. 22, at the Cadillac hotel in De-
troit. Mrs. Wallace told the alumnae
BERLIN'S NIGHT REVELS TO about the Alumnae residence on Wash-
END; POLICE STOP ORGIES tenaw avenue.
About 290 were present at the lunch-
Berlin, Feb. 22.-Berlin and other eon, among whom were Miss Lucy El=
large cities of Germany must now liott, social director of Helen Newber-
cease to celebrate the armistice by ry residence, Doris McDonald, '19,
carnivals of dancing, liquor-guzzling, Winfred Parsons, '19, Gertrude Gunn,
and night revels. '19, and Katherine Davis, '19.
WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
THOMAS N-CHOL SON
Bishop of the Chicago Area of the Methodist
Church
The Church in the Life of the Nation
TONIGHTMChurch TONIGHT
7:30 Methodist Ch :30
PRES.BYTERIAN HCHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION
Universal Day of Prayer
10:30 Leonard A. Barrett speaks
VENTURES OF FAITH

SETTING IS IMAGINARY
SOUTH AMERICAN STATE
Announcement of Cast Soon; Chorus
and Orchestra Tryouts This
Week
"Come On, Dad," is the title pick-
ed for the Michigan Union opera, to
be presented March 26, 27, 28 and 29
at the Whitney theater, F. C. Bell, '18,
general chairman of the opera com-
mittee, announced yesterday.
The play is a comic opera in three
acts, with all the scenes laid in the
little South American republic of Ar-
gazile. Revolutionary intrigue forms
the basis of the plot.
Music and Loeale Featured
The book and lyrics are by Donal
Hamilton Haines, '08, 'who wrote
"Michigenda" and "Culture," and the
words for some of the of Michigan's
songs. The music is expected to be
one of the principal attractions of
this year's opera.
The Union plans to spend about
three times as much as ever before
on the scenic settings, in order to
bring out effectively the atmosphere
of the semi-tropics, in which the opera
has been set.
Many Try Out
Director E. Mortimer Shuter, who is
coaching the production, has had an
abundance of talent from which to
select cast members. The final selec-
tions have been made in most instanc-
es, and announcement of the fortun-
ate tryouts will be made as soon as
the eligibility committee makes its re-
port.
Selection of chorus men will be
made this week. Names of men qual-
ified will be submitted to the eligibil-
ity committee, and from those who are
passed, the chorus will be picked.
Orchestra Tryouts Wanted
Earl V. Moore, '12, musical director,
has issued a call for orchestra try-
outs. They are asked to report at the
Union Monday, either between the
hours of 5 and 6 o'clock or 7 and 8
O'clock in the evening.
LIT REGISTRATION COMPLETE;
REGISTRAR HAS TARDY GRADES
Registration in the literary college
has ceased except in cases of students
returning from service and of those
obtaining special permission from the
registrar. Unavoidable changes in
elections will still be permitted pro-
viding the student applies for such
substitution of courses during the first
part of next week.
All grade cards, with the exception
of about two dozen which were re-
turned by the post office for lack of
correct and incomplete addresses,
should reach the students by Monday
noon. A student not receiving his
grades by this time may secure them
at the registrar's office. Students in re-
ceipt of cards which had no grade
designated after a certain course, may
learn such marks from the instructor
in charge of that course. .
BASKETBALL RESULTS
Northwestern, 32; Wisconsin, 23.
Chicago, 25; Michigan, 22.

MUNICH COUNCIL
SOVIETREPUBRLIC:-
STATE OF SEIGE DECLARED IN
MUNICH AND AIJGSBURG
IS REPORT
CROWD LYNCHES COUNT
ARCO VALLEY, ASSASSIN
"I Shall Be Killed on Returning to'
BavarIa," Late Premier Told
French Deputy
BULLETIN
Berlin, Feb. 22.-Bavaria last night
was declared a Soviet republic by
Soldiers and Workmen's council In
Munich, the Vossische Zietung today
says.
Copenhagen, Feb. 22. - State of
siege has been proclaimed in Munich
according to a despatch from Berlin
under date of Feb. 21, quoting ad-
vices from the Bavarian capitol.
A committee of action has, been
signed from three separate socialist
parties including the communists and ,
the executive of the Workmen's coun-
cil and Soldiers' council.-
Will Form New Ministry
The Cabinet will meet to deal with
the formation of a new ministry. A
state of siege has also been declared
at Augusburg, Bavaria, says a des-
patch fromr Berlin. There was a great
demonstration accompanied by dis-
turbances at Augusburg last evening,
light cavalary and sailors repeatedly
clearing the streets, firing volleys in-
to the crowd.
Assassin Lynched
Munich, Feb. 21.-Count Arco Val-
ley, the young student who shot and
killed Premier Eisner, was lynched by m
an angry crowd.
Previous reports of the assassina-
tion of Premier Eisner had been that
Count Arco Valley was wounded by a
Naval guard who accompanied the
premier. A report received in Lon-
don through Berlin said the count had
died of his wounds
Paris, Feb. 22.-Deputy Jean Lon-
guet, in his newspaper, Popularie,
says that after the speech of Kurk
Eisner, the late Bavarian premier, at
the Socialist's congress at Berne he
congratulated Eisner on the bravery
he had shown. Eisner replied, "Yes,
on returning to Bavaria I shall be
killed."
PLAN TO PROMOTE
PUBLIC SPEAKING
Realizing that interest in debating
and oratory on the campus is waning,
the reorganization committee of - the
oratorical association will hold a
meetingat 4 o'clock Wednesday after-
non in room 302, Mason hall, to: dis-
cuss plans for promoting public speak-
ing. Prof. R. D. T. Hollister is chair-
man of the committee.
Under the present conditions there is
no open campus public speaking club.
Every student upon payment of his
tuition fee is thenceforth entitled to
share in University debates and ora-
torical contests,.yet few take advan-
tage of this privilege.
To remedy this condition it is plan-
ned to form an organization composed
of all students who are actively inter-
ested in oratory and debating. It has
been suggested that this club be open

to' all students upon payment of set
dues, this last to insure that none but
those who have the interest of campus
oratory at heart will become members.
With such an organization in exist-
ence a lecture course bringing promi-
nent speakers to the University could
be arranged and all campus debating
contests managed by the club.
UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN WILL
TALK IN DETROIT ART MUSEUM
William W. Bishop, University libra-
rian, will lecture at the Detroit Mu-
seum of Art this afternoon. Mr.
Bishop is sent to Detroit by the Uni-
versity Extension committee.
The subject of the lecture will be,
"Books and Manuscripts of the Fif-
teenth Century." The fact that the
world has preferred Gothic to German
writings will be emphasized.
The discourse will be illustrated by
a valuable collection of stereoptican
slides.

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