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February 22, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATf
FAIR AND SLIGH
WARMER

AE
ITLY
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:4aitlli

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND MIHT WIRE
SER VICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 98. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

U. S. TRIPS WIL
LEAE USSIA WHEN
ICE FLOES OPEN
RUSSIAN OFFICIALS ANXIOUS TO
KNOW IF MEN ARE TO BE
REPLACED
339 INF. AMONG THOSE
AFFECTED BY ORDER
Navigation Not Likely to Open Before
June; Ice Breakers Incapable
of Carrying Forces
(By Associated Press)
Paderewski Heads Polish Government
Paris, Feb. 21. - Official announce-
ment was made today that representa-
tives of allies at a meeting at Quai
D'Orsay today decided that the allies
should recognize the Polish govern-
ment headed by Ignace J. Paderewski.
Archangel, Feb. 20 (delayed) - An-
nouncement from Washington that
American troops in North Russia are
to be withdrawn at the earliest possi-
ble moment in the spring was receiv-
ed with joy by the troops themselves
Official circles and also the Russian
population are anxious to know wheth-
er other troops will be sent to re-
place them or whether it means the
complete abandonment of this front
Navigation is now closed except for
ice breakers incapable of carrying a
large number of troops, and accord-
ing to naval advises June wil be the
earliest time for the opening of the
ice floes.
AmericaN troops affected by the an-
nouncement are the 339th Infantry,
and the 1st battalion of the 309th en-
gineers, and all the other forces en-
titled to demobilization after the con-
clusion of the war. There is con-
aiderable speculation in Archangle
whether they will be replaced by reg-
ulars or marines.
GOOD TIME AHEAD
AT CAMPUS MIXER
Plans have been completed for the
George Washington All-campus mix-
er which takes place at 2:30 o'clock
this afternoon in Barbour gymnas-
ium.
The girls of the University Glee
club will introduce those present be-
sides contributing a group of inter-
esting songs. Ike Fisher will furnish
a four piece orchestra.
Among the chaperones are Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur E. Humphreys, Mr. and
Mrs. Burton G. Grim, Mr. and Mrs.
William 0. Raymond, and Miss Grace'
Greenwood.
Tickets for men are on sale for 25
cents at Cushing's, Sheehan's, and
Calkins' on North University avenue.
The men will enter the gymnasium
by the upper door. Girls may obtain
their tickets at the lower gymnasium
door.
TWO MICHIGAN MEN IN CHARGE
OF NAVIGATION AT 0. M. S.
Lambert, ex-'19, and Sutter, '18, Were
Navigation Students at Uni-
versity
Ensign Charles F. Lambert, U. S.
N. R. F., ex-'19, is now head of the
department of navigation in the offic-

ers' material school at Great Lakes,
Ill. He is being assisted in his work
by Ensign Fred M. Sutter, U. S. N. R.
F., '18.
Before entering the service these
men studied navigation under Prof.
R. H. Curtiss in the University obser-
vatory. Lambert intends to return to
the University within a month, fol-
lowing his release from the service
which he expects within that time.

Wielders of Pen
Learn Hysteries
Four journalists were admitted in-
to Pi Delta Epsilon, national honor-
ary journalistic fraternity, at the
initiation held yesterday afternoon. At
the initiation banquet at the Catalpa
hotel B. Russell D'Ooge, '19, acted as
toastmaster. Mark K. Ehlbert, '20,
welcomed the initiates, for whom Ho-
bart F. Smith, '20E, responded. Other
talks were given by Clarence T. Fish-
leigh, '17E, and E. A. Baumgarth, '17.
The following men were initiated:
Louis L. Goodnow, '05L, editorial writ-
er and special correspondent for the
Detroit News, into honorary member-
ship; Earl H. Cress, '20, of The Mich-
igan Daily; Hobart F. Smith, '20, of
the Michiganensian, and Walter F.
Tschaeche, '20E, of the Michigan
Teohnic, into active membership.
50 Youthful Gobs
Miust Leave Navy
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Feb. 21.-The cases of 50
bluejackets under the minimum navy
enlistment age of 18 are being invest-
igated, according to the Great Lakes
Bulletin, official newspaper of t he
Great Lakes naval training station.
The youngesters are quartered at
Camp Decatur awaiting examination.
"If they kick me out now, I'll be
back next month," asserted Emmap-!
uel Gebaur of Minneapolis, the Bullet-
in says. "His father refused consent,
but he came anyway.
Virgil Cleary, 15, a sophomore in
the Emeric high school of Indiana-
oplis, joined the navy as an apprentice
seaman, but now his parents have
sent affidavits showing his exact age.
"But, how I hate to go," he declared.
After having coaxed 1}is miother to
sign an age certificate- permitting his
enlistment, James Everett Johnson of
Nashville, Tenn., was discovered by
naval officials to be only 17.
"I'd like to stay in, but Ma wants
me to speak English for her," said
Able Katz, a stubby 14-year-old rookie
whose parents have requested his dis-
charge. Abie ran away from home
and enlisted at Cincinnati under the
pretence of being 18. "I wanted to
be a yoeman," he said.
Marion Guillork of St. Landre, La.,
has the distinction of entering naval
service in knickerbockers. He is 17.
NIPPONESE MEMBERS
BANQUET TONIGHT;
Members of the Japanese club will
banquet at 6:15 o'clock tonight in
Lane hall. Arrangements for the din-
ner have been made by the club with
the co-operation of the Y. M. C. A.
Yonemoto Shinji, 20E, will be thej
toastmaster. Speakers of the evening
will be President Harry B. Hutchins,
Prof. J. R. Nelson, Prof. J. A. C.
Hildner, and Sotokichi Katsuizumi,
grad.
Including the members of the club,'
which number 24, and their guests,
40 are expected.

ARSITY WALLOPS
OHIO STATE FIVE
BY SCORE 38-2
CONTEST FULL OF FOULS; TIE
BROKEN FOR SIXTH PLACE
IN BIG TEN
WOLVERINES OUTPLAY
BUCKEYE STATE TERM
Karpus, NeClintock and Williams
Play ,Stellar game; 0. S. U.
Take All Tips-Off
With a gradual increase in the
quality of basketball played, the
Michigan Varsity last night, walked
away from the Ohio State five by a
score of 38-20.
Displaying better basketball than
at any time this season, and with per-
fect working of the five man defense,
the Maize and Blue triumphed over
the Buckeyes, by keeping the ball al-
most continually in their own hands.
Many Fouls
Despite the fact that the contest
was not as fast as others seen on the
floor, numerous fouls were called on
both sides. Weltner, guard on thd
visiting team, was forced out of the
contest when four personals were
called on him in rapid succession,
during the second half. McDonald,
the Scarlet center, managed to take
the tip off, in almost every case, but
Michigan would not allow Ohio to
hold te ball long.
Karpus of the Michigan five
played a brilliant game during the
second half, dribbling his way to the
basket for two pretty goals. McClin-
tock, at center 'for the Wolverines,
managed to steal the ball from Mc-
Donald's own tip off, and with sensa-
tional ability, carried the ball to the
basket for two points.
Ohio's failing camein their inabil-
ity to move the ball rapidly enough
to keep it away from the Wolverine
five. Coach Mitchell's men guarded
the visitors exceptionally well, yet
they were able to slip in 20 points,
six of which were made on fouls.
Ohio Sends on Three Subs
During the second half, the Scar-
let players sent three new men into
the contest, placing practically a new
team against the Varsity. Werthwein,
who substituted for McDonald, amaz-
ed the Michigan fans with his accur-
ate basket shooting, yet it could not
avercome the playing of the Wolver-
ine team.
A total of 26 fouls were called, eight
of which were charged against Ohio
State as personals, while the Wol-
verines registered nine. Holding
proved the principal cause for them.
Neither squad seemed able to keep
their hands off the opposing mei.
Michigan's substitutions did not
come until the last few minutes of the
second half, when Coach Mitchell sent
Bornstein, Wilson, and Emory into
the game. Bornstein registered one
pretty field goal, while the other tv/o
men were not in the contest long
enough to make their work count
points.
Karpus, the brilliant Maize and
Blue forward, took the largest count
in scoring, with 13 points to his cred-
it. Francis, of the visiting five, led
their bunch with 10 points.
Breaks Tie Standing
The contest breaks the Michigan-
Ohio State tie for the sixth place in
the Conference standing, and gives it

to Michigan. It also evens Michigan's
old rivalry with the Buckeye state
team, the latter having taken the long
end of the figure in last year's con-

Washington
Commemorating the birth of one
of the greatest exponents of democ-
racy that the world has ever seen,
the University has. suspended all
classes for the day, while prac-
tically every nation on the globe will
cease its business today to pay re-
spect to the father of the United
States-George Washington.
Especially fitted to the times is the
celebration of the event, is the opin-
ion of the thinking world, for having
watched the colonies of America be-
come a league to enforce respect and
co-operation together with democracy

"irst In Peace!"
among them, Washington is to be
taken as an example for the modeling
of the world league to enforce peace,
according to authorities.
It is the 177th anniversary of the
greatest American's birth, and is be-
ing celebrated over the United States,
his country, with the deepest and sin-
cerest of respect for the great man.
The University students and the cit-
izens of Ann Arbor are doing their
share in paying respect to the peer
of democrats by varied celebrations.
Dances, dinners, and other forms of
enjoyment are scheduled for the day.

BAVARIAN PREMIER
'RA DEPUTY SHOT:
'MINISTER INJURED

EISNER ASSASSINATED IN
NICH ON WAY TO
DIET

MU.

i

DEMOCRATS NOMINATE 4
WOMEN fOR0CANDIDATES
QRS. HOUSTON, LUDINGTON, AND
MRS. BOLTWOOD, GRAND
RAPIDS, REGENTS
Lansing, Feb. 21.-Michigan Dem-
ocrats at the State convention today
nominated four women candidates for
state elective offices and gave wom-
-en one-third of the representation on
the State central committee.
Women voters were appealed to by
women speakers to come into the
Democratic ranks. These speakers
were Florence Allan, Cleveland, Ohio;
Mrs. Edith Meredity, Washington, D.
C., and Dr Emma Bower, Port Hu-
ron.
Mayor James H. Baker of Adrian,
temporary chairman of the conven-
tion, in his keynote address defended
the policies of the Democratic na-
tional administration, but repulsed the
part taken by President Wilson in the
formation of a League of Nations He
urged a better understanding be-
tween capital and labor, restriction of

NEW C. OFC.1PLAS FOR
BIG BANQUE1T AT UNION

PLANS TO BE DISCUSSED
FIRST MEETING OF NEW
ORGANIZATION

ATI

Secretary, Chamber of Commerce
306-307 First National' Bank
Building
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Please reserve me .... seats at
the Chamber of Commerce din-
ner, Wednesday, Feb. 26.
Name....................
Address ................ ..

The new Chamber of Commerce will
give its introductory dinner at 6
o'clock next Wednesday evening at the
Michigan Union. A large number of
enthusiastic citizens are expected to
attend, and to make ample prepara-
tions for all who come it will be nec-
essary for those intending to go to
fill out the above form and mail it

- -1 - - I I - I I - . .

immigration. emnlovmento li. today to the secretary, Shirley

W.

and protested the seating of U. S. sen-
ator-elect, Truman H. Newberry, be-
cause of alleged excess of expendi-
tures.3
The four women nominated for state
offices are: for regents of the Uni-
versity df Michigan, Mrs. Effie Gay-
for Houston of Ludington, and Mrs.
Emma Comstock Boltwood of Grand
Rapids; for superintendent of public
instruction, Miss Berry , Hinsdale,
Grand Rapids, and for members of
the state board of education, Miss
Josephine Fitzgerald of Port Huron.
Candidates for other state offices
are as follows: Patrick H. O'Brien
of Houghton, and Robert E. Bunker,
Muskegon; members of state board of
agriculture, George Winagar, Her-
bert A. Libermore.
Thos. P. Preston of Ionia was elect-
ed chairman of the state central
committee to succeed Albert A. Stev-
enson of Port Huron.
8 Women Honored
At Party of ,A. ii.
Athletic association pins, represent-
ing 60 or more honor points, were
awarded at the Women's Atheltic as-
sociation banquet held last night in
Barbour gymnasium, to two girls, Mar-
cia Pinkerton, '19, and Lucy Huff-.
man, '20. Arm bands received for
30 honor points were won by six
girls: Katrina Schermerhorn, '21;
Elizabeth McCormack, '19; Mary
Morse, '19; Edna Daskam, '20; Bea-
trice Beckwith, '21, and Ruth Ab-
bott, '20.-1
Jane Duemling, '19, president of the
Athletic association, presided as toast-
mistress. Those responding to toasts
were: Miss Marian Wood, Dr. Eloise
Walker, and Madge Meade, '16. The
following heads of departments of the
association gave brief talks on differ-
ent phases of athletics: Elsie Erley,
'20; Ruth Jennings, '20; Grace Hall,
'20; Kathryn Loveland, '20; Emma
Riggs, '19.

Smith.
This new Chamber of Commerce is
the product of a scheme whereby the
Ann Arbor Civic association and the
Ann Arbor Merchants' Credit asso-
ciation were united for the purpose
of mutually aiding themselves and the
city at large. Plans to be carried out
will be the principal topic for dis-
cussion at the dinner Wednesday
evening, was the statement made by
Secretary Shirley W. Smith.
LIEUT. EATON, '19, RETURNS
AFTER MONTHS IN FOE PRISON
Former Student Captured When
Forced to Land Behind Enemy
Lines
Lieut. Paul K. Eaton, '19, who en-
listed in the air service in the sum-
mer of 1917, and spent seven months
in German prison camps after his,
capture in the spring of this last
year, was given a tremendous wel-
come at his home in Jackson this
week.
In an observation party of nine
American-manned planes in France
he became separated by the attacking
Hun aviators. The enemy fire struck
and damaged his engine, and he was
forced to land behind the German
lines. Wounded by shell fire, he re-
mained in a shell crater until discov-
ered by a searching party.
Then followed seven months of
prison life, experiences that Lieuten-
ant Eaton says little about because
of the thoughts of suffering and pri-
vation that the telling suggest. Food
and medical care were entirely inade-
quate to the needs of a soldier in
good health, and, weakened by the
wound, he would have never seen the
home folks but for the aid and food
obtained from a fellow prisoner in the
British forces.
His return to Jackson followed a
period of convalescence in a New
York hospital. Lieutenant Eaton ap-
pears in excellent health, the effects
of the prisons have disappeared.

SHOOTING OCCURS IN
SESSIONS OF LANDTAG
Government Troops Put Down Upris-
ing of Sparticans; Soldiers
Wounded
(By Associated Press)
German Prisoners Not Repatriated
Paris, Feb. 21.-Mathlas Erzberger,
head of the German Armistice com-
mission, has been informed by the
Allied War council that at present
there canibe no discussion of the
repatriation of German prisoners of
war except of wounded men or men
who are seriously ill.
Copenhagen, Feb. 21.-Kurk Eisner,
the Bavarian premier, was shot and
killed today by Lieut. Aro Valley,
while Eisner was on his way from the
foreign ministry in Munich to the
Diet, says a Munich despatch.
The shooting occurred in Parnnars-
trasse, and death resulted from two
shots which entered the back of his
head.
Military Guards Diet
Mnich, Feb. 21.-Herr Auer, Ba-
varian minister of the interior, has
been shot. The shooting took place
during a session of the Landtag while
Auer was alluding to the assassina-
tion of Kurk Eisner, the Bavarian pre-
mier.
Auer fell, wounded in the left side
and Deputy Osel was killed and two
other officials were seriously wounded.
The shts were fired from the pub-
lic gallery and caused a panic among
the deputies.
The Diet building is now being
guarded by the military.
Sparticans Storm Buildings
Copenhagen, Feb. 21. - Spartican
forces in Munich Tuesday stormed
the police station "and arrested the
chief of police and several other per-
sons, according to a report from Ber-
lin.
Government troops attacked the
Spartican forces and before 7 o'clock
in the evening had recaptured all pub-
lic buildings.
Several soldiers were wounded in
the fighting. Soldiers who formed the
Spartican garrisons under the name
of "Committee for Protection" sur-
rendered.,
Sparticans arrested two members
of the Workmen's council early to-
day but later all of those arrested
were released.
FORMER INLANDER EDITOR AND
SERGEANT-MAJOR FISCHER WED
Miss Margaret Benedict, ex'20, Mar-
ries Detroit Newspaper
Man
Miss Marget Pauline Benedict, '20,
was married to Sgt.-Maj.' Alfred
Fischer on Thursday, Feb. 20, in
Ionia. The ceremony was performed
by Dr. W. K. Spencer of the First
Presbyterian church of Ionia, and the
couple were attended by Miss Frances
Loomis and Major Ralph H. Durkee,
of Ann Arbor.
Miss Benedict, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Gordon A. Benedict, was the first
girl to be editor of the Inlander and
was popular in various other societies
on the.campus. Mr. Fischer was ser-
geant-major of the S. A. T. C. here
at the University, and several years
ago was assistant state editor of the
Detroit Free Press.
After the wedding Mr. and Mrs.
Fischer left Ionia for Detroit, where
they will make their residence.

/

SOPH LITS
NEW

ELECT
PRESIDENT

Proof that the class spirit of the
sophomore lits is rising was evinced
by the large number who attended the
class meeting held yesterday after-
non in University hall.-
Lawrence Butler was elected class
president, to fill the vacancy of Ed-
win Bovill, ex-'21, who has left the
University.
It was decided that the dues for
the second seemster will be set at
25 cents and will be collected as soon
as the new president appoints the va-
rious committees. A list of commit-
te! men will be published within a few
das.

test.
(Continued'on Page Three)
Gymn Closed Today Until Game
Waterman gymnasium will be clos-
ed today but will be open in the even-
ing for the basketball game.

M

'. '

This P. M.
2:30-5:30 at
Barbour
Gymnasium
Admission 25c'

ALL -CAMPUS

MIXER

Men obtain tickets
at Sheehan's and
Cusbing's, State
St. Calkins, South
University.'
'Women obtain
tickets at door,

Given by the GIRL'S GLEE CLUB
SPECIAL MUSICAL NUMBERS

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