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February 21, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-21

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW
TODAYQ

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ASSOCiATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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~EB VICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 97. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

i

"20TH. CENTURY
MAIRTYRS"H RCEI
HEAVY SENTENCES
MILWAUKEE SOCIALISTS WHO OB-
STRUCTED DRAFT ACT ARE
CONVICTED
CONGRESSMAN B U R G E R
READS AND SHEDS TEARS
"Americanism Is Now Synonymous
with Capitalism," Declare Men
on Trial

SIX WRITE MUSIC
FOR UNION OPERA
Six men have submitted music for
the 1919 Union opera, which promis-
es to represent the best composers on
the campus. The scores for the last
two or three operas have been mainly
the work of two or three men, but the
1919 production will embody the musi-
cal themes of a larger number.
The composers forthis year are: A.
J. Gornetzky, '19L; Donald E. Rhodes,
'21; George H. Roderick, '21E, James
W. Glover, '22; M. W. Kann, '20, and
Phil Diamond.
"There will be several songs in act
one, with unusual scenic and dancing
effects and ensemble numbers by mem-
bers of the cast," was-the statement
made yesterday by Earl V. Moore, '12,
who is supervising the writing of the
music. "The finales will also be espe-
cially picturesque."
Rapid progress has been made in
the composing of the music, and a
large proportion of the numbers are
already completed.
Tickets Go Fast
For Union Show

"Even As You And I"

LITERARY GRADES
MAILED YESTERDAY

He was a typical undertaker, this
freshman.
He went about the campus with a

was sad.
Often he would stop, rub his fat,
pudgy hands together, and murmur

dolorous expression, and occasionally such sentiments as "too near Toledo"
heaved a deep sigh as if to insinuate or, "what will it all matter in 50 years

that all paths lead but to the grave.
His freshman toque was arranged
like a wreath of funeral flowers

from now anyway?"
All this on Friday, the day of joy
and gladness, but here's the reason.
His marks had come.,

around a grave

stone, and his look

Chicago, Feb. 20.-A maximum sen
tence of 20 years at Leavenworth wa
imposed upon Congressman-elect Vic
tor Burger of Milwaukee and fou
other socialists of Milwaukee wh
linked themselves to, history's greates
martyrs.
Though convicted of conspiracy t
obstruct the draft act, they succeede
in getting release on $25,000 bail an
declared they would carry their lega
fight to the United States suprem
court.
Burger is the publisher of the Mil
waukee Leader;. the other men ar
Rev. Irwin St. John Tucker, lecture
and writer; Adolph Germer, nationa
secretary of the socialist party; Lewi
Engdhal, editor of the American So
cialist, and William Cruse, head of the
Young People's Socialist league.
Judge Landis overruled the motion
for a new trial and for a stay of execu
tion, but granted the filing of a peti
tion for as writ of error.
Burger and his associates took ful
advantage of the inquiry of the judge
before sentence. The congressman
elect finished reading his typewritten
statement with tears in his eyes. He
expressed no surprise, though declar-
ing that it was a violation of the con-
stitution. "The war was an imperial-
istic and commercial one," he declar-
ed, "and over half the white race is in
a chaotic state of revolution.
"The so called league of nations is
simply a thin screen behind which the
capitalist men of the winning side are
dividing the spoils," said Burger, who
also declared that Americanism is now
synonymous with capitalism.
Tucker in his plea compared him-
self and the other defendants to Christ.

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WINNER Of' WAR CROSS
TO TELL OF ZEEBRSG
CAPTAIN CARPENTER, V. C., WILL
RELATE DARING SUBI
RAID
Captain Carpenter, V. C., will give
his illustrated lecture on the famous
Zeebrugge raid, Sunday evening, at the
Arcadia, in Detroit. Captain Carpen-
ter will speak under the auspices of
the University of Michigan club of De-
troit, the president of which has sent
the following telegram to the Michi-
gan Union:
"Our club would feel greatly honor-
ed to have with us on this occasion a
large representation from the student
body and faculty. Will you extend to
President Hutchins our invitation for
him to preside at the meeting and in-
troduce Captain Carpenter?"
President Hutchins announced last
night that he had accepted the invi-
tation.
Captain Carpenter, who has been
decorated with the Victoria Cross, con-
ceived the noted raid on the German
submarine base at Zeebrugge. He was
commander of the "Vindictive" during
this perilous naval exploit.

Tickets for the Spotlight Vaude-
ville, scheduled for Friday, Feb. 28, in
Hill Aiditorium, have met a good sale
already, when it is considered that the
show is a week off.
Desiring to assist the American
University Union in Paris, for the ben-
efit of which the vaudeville is to be
given, several campus and civic organ-
izations have volunteered to sell tick-
ets. One hundred and seventy-seven
stores in the city have them on sale.
Every fraternity has been sent a let-
ter regarding the vaudeville, and it is
expected that these appeals will meet
a ready response.
Members of the ticket sales commit-
tee will be, posted on and around the
campus beginning next Wednesday,
and passersby will be harangued to
purchase the cardboards at 35 cents
each.

PATRIOTISM "NEW" NOTE
FOR PUBLIC SCHOULS
KEYNOTE THAT WILL PERMEATE
MODERN TEACHING, SAYS
PROFESSOR
"Patriotism is a growing note in
courses of the public schools of Amer-
ica," says Prof. A. S. Whitney of the
educational department. "While there
is no course taught under that name
it is the keynote that will permeate
modern teaching and the awakening of
national interest is the aim of the am-
bitious pedagogue. This tendency will
form itself in the establishing of civic
consciousness in the youth of today
and the man of tomorrow.
"This spirit was started before the
war but has been greatly accentuated
since the end of the war" he contin-
ues, "and the note of service that has
been displayed. Children from the first
grade throughout his whole Vducation
will be taught his civic duty to the
community, from keeping his yard
clean to the managing of politics. He
will be taught to take advantage of the
high privilege of voting and to use
toward the betterment of the commu-
nity.
"Courses in high schools will be
greatly modified in the near future as
the science of history, sociology and
economics will be introduced and will
supersede the technical study of math-
ematics and memory work. The study
of civics, especially, will become the
instrument of this patriotic element
and will be used to establish in the
leaders of tomorrow a sense of civic
duty instead of learning the mechani-
cal terms of the Constitution."
MUSEUM GROWTH
FORCES STORAGE

Grade cards in the literary college
have all been made out and those
which were not mailed yesterday aft-
ernoon will be sent this morning. A
few of the cards will not be complete,
this being unavoidable. Such grades
which do not appear on the card may
be learned from the instructor in that
course.
Changes in elections can be made
Friday and Saturday mornings, these
days being the last times for such
substitutions. Petitions for permis-
sion to elect more than the limit of
courses will also be received on these
days only.
Pi Delta Epsilon
Takes In Scribes
Surreptitiously seeking more mod-
ern means of offering newsier news
and ameliorated advertising, several
simple scribes will enter this after-
noon the ranks, of Pi Delta Epsilon,
national honorary fraternity in jour-
nalism.
This year, for the first time, the
budding journalists will not besport
themselves before a State street audi-
ence, as the initiation is not to be pub-
lic. Formerly the would-be scribes,
armed with the implements of their
profession, have harassed passers-by
in the endeavor to ascertain the latest
news and to dispose of antiquated is-
sues of campus publications. Today,
however, town gossip is to be obtain-
ed in greater privacy.
Scratch, goes the pen; tick, ticks the
typewriter as the initiates enter Pi
Delta Epsilon.
ALL-LAW SMOKER
PLANS COMPLETED

PRESIDENT'S SHIP,
ALONE, PROCEEDS
IN BAD, WEATHER
U. S. NEW MEXICO STRIPS PORT
STEAM TURBIN; DROPS
BEHIND
DENVER PUTS OUT TO
SEA TO MEET LINER

Battleship
Speed

Yanks Arrive In Berlin
London, Feb. 20.-American troops
have arrived in Berlin and have been
quartered in hotels according to dis-
patches quoting the Berlin correspon-
dent. The troops are said to belong
to the "113th New York regiment."
Their duties will be the protection of
the transportation of food.
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 20.-The Presi-
dential ship, George Washington, is
proceeding to Boston in heavy weath-
er without naval convoy, the navy de-
partment was advised by radio to-
night.
The convoying battleship, New Mex-
ico, stripped one of her turbine eng-
ines and was forced to drop out of the
fleet, while heavy weather made it
necessary for the destroyer flotilla
to leave the line.
The message said that the destroy-
ers expected to rejoin the George
Washington when the weather moder-
ated. In the mean time, however,
Secretary Daniels has ordered the
cruiser Denver to put to sea to meet
the big liner.
The accident to the New Mexico ef-
fected only the port steam turbine and
she is still able to maintain a speed
of 15 knots an hour.
ORATORICAL CONTEST WILL
BE HELD AT NORTHWESTERN

Still Able to Maintain
of Fifteen Knots an
Hour

MEN FORMERLY IN
SERVICE, ON BAND

3
a

CANFIELD SPEAKS
ON FRENCH PLAYS

GLEE CLUB HOSTESSES FOR
ALL-CAMPUS MIXER SATURDAY
Organization to Give Musical Program
During Afternoon; Tickets Now,
on Sale
With the University Girls' Glee club
aeting as hostesses, the All-campus
mixer to be given at 2:30 o'clock to-
morrow afternoon in Barbour gymna-
slum, promises to be one of the most
successful of the year.
The Glee cluba under the direction
of Miss Nora Crane Hunt, will sing
Karl Hahn's "Mocking Bird," "The
Marseillaise," in French, "Laddie in
Khaki," by IvorNovello, and a number
of college songs.
Tickets/for men may be procured at
Wahr's and Calkins'. Women's tickets
will be sold at the door of the gymna-
slum.
MICHIGAN )MAN WINS FIRST
PLACE IN VOCAL CONTEST
Robert R. Dieterle, '21M, has just re-
ceived notification that he won first
place among the vocal contestants at
the state competition held Dec. 18 in
Detroit, under the auspices of the Na-
tional Federation of Musical clubs.
Dieterle has taken part in a num-
ber of the May Festivals and also in
recitals throughout the state. His sing-
ing in last year's Union opera attract-
ed much favorable comment in Mich-
igan cities on the itinerary.
BASKETBALL MEN MEET
Basketball representatives
from all classes will meet at 7
o'clock Monday in the offices of
the Athletic association in the
Ann Arbor Press building, to ar-
range the interclass basketball
schedule. If any class has not
elected a representative the
president is asked to appoint

"In order to appreciate the early
French plays one must consider the
political and social conditions which
existed at the close of the middle
ages, and above all the great religious
faith of the medieval period," said
Psof. A. G. Canfield in a lecture be-
fore the Cercle Francais given in
French on "L'ancien Theatre Fran-
cais," yesterday afternoon.
Professor Canfield traced the be-
ginnings of the French theater from
the religious fetes in which repre-
sentations of the holy family were
given before the altar, to the larger
ones given out of doors in public
places.
In the fifteenth and sixteenth cen-
turies morality plays and farces be-
came popular, the former being some-
times gay andisometimes solemn, but
always didactic. The farces contain-
ed no high ideas but strove to cause
laughs by showing people's faults'and
vices, he said.
UNIVERSAL DAY OF PRAYER
PLANNED FOR NEXT SUNDAY
Students all over the world will hold
a universal day of prayer Sunday. The
day will be observed especially by the
World's Student Christian federation.
At the Presbyterian and Baptist
churches observance will be made of
the day.
The federation is a union of the dif-
ferent national christian movements
now existing in about 40 nations. In
the year 1895 leaders in student chris-
tian movements held a convention at
Vadstena Sweden and the result was
the federation. The last annual report
shu wed approximately 190,000 mem-
bers and that branches have been es-
tablished in more than 2,300 universi-
ties and ! ileges in-40 different coun-
tries.
Soph Lits to Elect Third President
To elect a class president for the
third time within two m nths, a meet-
ing of the sophomore lts has been
called for 3 o'clock Friday afternoon in
University hall. A president will be
chosen to fill the vacancy caused by
Edwin G. Bovill, ex-'21, who has with-
drawn from the University. Bovill was
elected in January when the first class
president, Hugh White, left the Uni-

The Varsity band got a good start
this semester at the recent rehearsal
held in the School of Music. It was
found that many of the old players
and new men who played in the S. A.
T. C. and navy musical organiza-
tions, are ready to take their places
on the Michigan band.
Capt. Wilfred Wilson, director of
the band, states that the material
this year is excellent, and that a good
organization is a certainty. It will
consist of 61 musicians.
Prof. John R. Brumm, faculty man-
ager of the band, and Captain Wil-
son have not decided on any definite
time for concerts, but it is planned
that one or two shall be given to de-
fray the expense of sending the band
on a trip. Captain Wilson believes
that it can be whipped into excellent
shape within six weeks' time.
BODY OF WOMAN SPARTICAN
FOUND IN LAND WEHR CANAL
Friends Identify Corpse as That of
Rosa Luxenbourg, Killed
Jan. 17

An All-Law > smoker will be held
at 8 o'clock next Wednesday night,
Feb. 26, in the old Union building.
Careful preparations have been made
to make this event one of unusual in-
terest. Light refreshments will be
served.
Prof. H. M. Bates, Dean of the Law
school, and L. C. Field, '19L, will be the
speakers of the evening. This is the
first opportunity for students in the
Law school to get together on a social
occasion since the beginning of the
new semester. Many of the men just
returned from the service will be
present.

Study collections in the University
museum ,have grown so rapidly that
storing will be necessary until more
room or a new building is secured.
Tlie exhibits to be stored are those of
the mammals, which are among the
most interesting to the visitors.
At present carpenters are remodel-
ing the north wing of the second floor
to provide offices and space for the in-
sect collections. These various study
collections are vitally necessary to
the research work carried on constant-
ly by members of the department of
zoology.
Few persons on the campus realize
that in this. old building are rare spec-

(By Associated Press) imens that are duplcated by no other
Berlin, Feb. 19.-The bruised and museum, American or European, say
battered body of a woman which ap- authorities. Not only do visiting sci-
parently had been in the water for entists find subjects for study, but
about three weeks, has been discov- some objects have been loaned to oth-
ered in the Landwehr canal, accord- er institutions by the University.
ing to the Tageblatt. Notwithstanding It is to be hoped that facilities for
the advanced stage of decomposition, the exhibits now going into storage
acquaintances have identified it as will be available. The present building,
the body of Rosa Luxenbourg, the overcrowded and non-fireproof, is
Spartican who was killed, Jan. 17. wholly inadequate, it is said.

ACTION OF SUPREME COURT
AFFECTS ANN ARBOR LITTLE
Liquor Ruling of State Tribunal
Does Not Bring Concern
Here
Action by the supreme court mak-
ing the search and seizure section of
the prohibition law void has had but
little effect on this city to date. Lo-
cal people have been content to ply
their peaceful trades as usual.
Sheriff A. C. Pack, the most con-
cerned, stated the ruling has made
a "goat" of the state constabulary and
the sheriff's departments, and is be-
littling the conscientious efforts their
forces have made to preserve law and
order during the last few months.
Chief of Police O'Brien believes
that many suits will be started in
this city for the recovery of liquor,
as all that has been confiscated has
beentturned over to the University
hospital.
FEW TICKETS REMAIN FOR
WASHINGTON BIRTHDAY DANCE
Only a few tickets to the Wash-
ington's birthday dance at the Mich-
igan Union.this evening remained un-
sold at a late hour last night. The
few remaining tickets are on sale at
the Union desk. Shook's special six
piece orchestra of Detroit promises
to liven things up with its jazz music.
Promptly at 9 o'clock the dance
will begin, and will last, until 2
o'clock. The Union hall has been
especially decorated for the occasion.j
Two Students Receive Appointments
Appointments have been given
through the educational department to
Dorothy Thomas, '19, who will do sec-
retarial work on the board of health
at Lansing and to R. C. Hunter, '17,
who will teach Latin in the Saginaw
high school.

Preliminaries for Choice of Michigan
Representatives to Be Held
in March
Northwestern university, Evanston,
Ill., has been selected as the place
of holding the Northern Oratorical
league contest, it was stated yester-
day. Preliminaries for the final choice
of Michigan's representatives at this
debate will be held in March.
This contest will be the only inter-
collegiate debate in which Micogan
will partake within the college year
1918-19.
The Northern league is composed
of the universities of Michigan, Wis-
consin, Illinois, Minnesota, Iowa,
Northwestern, and Oberlin college.
Due to the war and its attendant un-
settled college conditions the central
group, composed of the universities
of Michigan, Chicago, and Northwest-
ern, and the mid-west group, made up
of the universities of Michigan, Illin-
ois, and Wisconsin, indefinitely sus-
pended activities.
RUSSIAN WORKMEN DEMAND
CECESSION OF CIVIL WAR
(British Wireless)
London, Feb. 20.- Sixty thousand
workmen on strike in Petrograd de-
manding the cecession of civil war
and establishing of free trade, accord-
ing to a Russian wireless dispatch re-
ceived here today.
Reliable inf-ormation received in
London from sources which might be
expected to be sympathetic with the
Russian revolution goes to show that
opposition to the Bolsheviki rule is
increasing among the more enlighten-
ed working classes of Russia.

CATHOLIC STUDENTS ARRANGE
PLANS FOR COMING YEAR
Committees and plans for the com-
ing semester were the topics under
discussion at the meeting of the
Catholic Students' club held Wednes-
day. It is the purpose of this or-
ganization to combine pleasure and
intellectual work in such a way as
to please everyone.
The club will give a dance for
members Friday, Feb. 28, at aPrrish
hall. One of the committees is en-
deavoring to secure a number of
speakers to address the meetings of
the coming semester.
Girls' Glee Club to Meet
There will be a special meeting of
the Girls' Glee club at 4 o'clock this+
afternoon in Barbour gymnasium. All+
members must attend.

E. J. MARTIN RETURNS FROM FT.
SILL AFTER SIX MONTHS DUTY
Mr. E. J. Martin, a member of the
department of physics, returned to
the University Wednesday after se-
curing his discharge from the army.
Mr. Martin was stationed at Post
Field, Ft. Sill, Okla., where he was en-
gaged as a wireless telephone expert.
His work consisted of experimenting
with the wireless telephone, and this
took him into the air many times. Mr.
Martin had been in the service about
six months.
Yanks Meet Little Winter in Prussia
With the American Army of Occu-
pation, Jan. 19 (by mail).-American
soldiers of the army of occupation are
enjoying the mildest January experi-
enced in Rhenieh Prussia in the last
10 years.

NO CLASSES SATURDAY

Classes in all of the colleges
of the University will be sus-
pended on Washington's birth-
day, Saturday, Feb. 22. The
registrar's and the treasurer's
offices will remain open Satur-
day morning and any student
who has not yet registered may
do so at that time.
HARRY B. HUTCHINS,
President.

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