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February 20, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

;IUAI

aid Harks Back gently removed the 1,900 pound chapel'
bell from the tower in the South
> Good O l D as building and laid it to rest under the
YS walk in front of what is now Univer-
sity hall., The police force of Ann Ar-
I you ever hear a junior or se. bor then consisted of two, with no
narrate upon the "good old days" campus policemen."
ro long years ago? Those were the genuine "good old
n you imagine "the times' of days."
de past?
w, are you able to even dream of FurtherPof
e days" 20 years ago?j
en,, how about 42 years?A
rty-two years have made a "con-
able" change on and about' the -
us in the spirit as well as in the Spring has come!,
tions of the students, according Anyway, the first case of chicken-pox
r. E. Donovan, '76E-'78L, who is has been reported to the health ser-
ling this week in Ann Arbor. The vice. No epidemic is expected, how-
ase in the number of students ever.
especially in the police-force has Health conditions are said to be
ed this great change, is his be- very good on the whole, although a
few cases of the usual "spring" con-
1 '76 there were but five colleges tagious ailments will doubtless occur
e University, and only four build- with the influx of new and returning
on the campus," said Mr. Dono- men from all parts of the country.
"These were the colleges in law, Dr. Forsythe left Tuesday to lec-
ieering, medicine, and chemistty. ture for a few days on health topics
he buildings we had then were the among the high school boys of near-
h and South buildings (now the by towns fn the state. This is the see-
and south wings of University and such trip he has made at the re-
and the old medical and law quest of the state board of health.
.ings. He will return Monday.

>rti
rth
11)

'here were about 1,300 enrolled in
University at that time. 6ne hun-
d and forty-six started in my fresh-
1 engineering class and only 76
duated. Over 200 graduated in my
class,,'but then of course the law
riculum consisted of only two
ms of six months each. Of the pro-.
iors I had, four are still on . the
apus '
We had no intercollegiate games,
s games being then the rage. A
ball game meant to us one college
about 400 challenging another on
campus of about the same num-
It was laws' versus, 'engineers.'
athletic field was where the engi-
ring buildings now stand.
It was our class that did the last
I hazing, and it was our class that
PALDING'S
1+4Q For Shoes
... Caps, Belts
E LDFoot Ball
J Equipment
~#' Sweaters
k.."* Jerseys
And the implements for every
athletic gqme, of course.
k. G. S PALDING & BROS.
211-211? So. State St..
CHICAGO, ILL.

GEOLOGY COURSE TO INCLUDE
NEW FEATURES THIS SEMESTER
Special features will be included
this semester in the course in geolo-
gy 20 given by Mr. Frank Leverett,
lecturer on glacial geology in the de-
partment of geology. Instead of con-
fining the study to one continent, as
has been done heretofore, the glacial
features' of both Europe and North
America will be considered, the ter-
ritory studied including various bat-
tlefields' of Italy and northern France,
in so far as they contain material for,
glacial research.
The course will consist of two reci-
tations a week for six weeks, after'
which the class will make excursions
t3 Detroit, Flint, and other nearby
points. The elementary course in gen-
eral geology. is a prerequisite to the
course, which is open to students of
the, literary, engineering, and graduate
departments. Mr. Leverett may be
consulted regarding the course at 7
o'clock tonight in room 327G, Natural
Science building.
1

_

CASH FOR
LIBERTY BONDS
David A. Killins & Sons
107 1at National Bank Bldg.

TRANSATLANTIC FLIGHT
NOT A SPORTING STUNT
PROF. PAWLOWSKI SAYS PRACU
TICAL VALUE SHOULD BE
CONSIDERED
According to Felix W. Pawlowski
professor of aeronautical engineering,
a translantic flight promises to be
an accomplishment in a few years.
Professor Pawiowski says, "The
transatlantic flight should not be con-
sidered, as it often is, as a stunt or a
sporting performance unlikely to be
duplicated; its value then would be
meaningless for practical purposes.
Need Faster Communioatioun
"What we really need is a faster
and a safer means of communication.
The present 'surface methods' of loco-
motion, whether on land or water,
have already reached their limit ef
speed. We can travel no faster eith-
er on trains, automobiles or boats;
not because it would cost too much,
but because It would be too danger-
ous.
"The whole great future of aero-
nautics is guaranteed by the fact that
(as is the case of aviation) the safe-
ty of travel increases with the speed.
"In the future development of aero-
nautics the question of long distance
flights without re-fuelling is of great
importance. A route linking Amer-
ica and Europe is now under discus-
sion.
Problem Will Be Solved
"Personally, I do not doubt for a
moment, that the problem will be
solved successfully within the next
few years, although it offers consid-
erable difficulties at the present mo-
ment. The difficulties are purely
technical and the way to overcome
them is clear.
"From the many projects, now giv-
en publicity, the one allowing for sev-
eral igtermediate stops on the ocean
for the purpose of re-fuelling, must
be rejected as it involves too many
difficulties and dangers foreign to the
problem itself.
"The flight must be a continuous
one. The shortest gap between the
two continents is 1900 miles (New-
foundlandIreland). Another route
which is considered is from New-
foundland to Portugal via the Azores,
comprising two gaps of 1200 and 900
miles respectively. To take care of
deviation from the curse and con-
trary winds a margin of some 50 per
cent must be added. Thus an airplane
for a transatlantic flight must be able
to fly-a distance of 1800 or of 2800
miles without re-fuelling. At pre-
sent this seems to be entirely within
the possibilities. The present long
distance flight record is 1400 miles.
New Era for Dirigibles
"It is impossible for me to discuss
the various types of airplanes pro-
posed for the accomplishment of this
flight, as it could be of little interest
to readers of The Daily. But I may
mention another possibility which
seems to open up a new ea for dir-
igibles, discovered also by American
genius.
"I refer to some two or three big
plants in Texas that are now produc-
Ing'Helium in large quantities to sup-
plant the use of the dangerous hydro-
gen.
"Helium was discovered in the na-
tural gas in certain areas around
Kansas, Texas and Oklahoma, by Pro-
fessor Carter of the University of
Kansas. Now, through the instru-
mentality ofuthe United States army
,and navy authorities in collaboration

with Professor Carter and Professor
Davis, the gas has been collected and
compressed and cooled down in the
same kind of an apparatus that is used
to liquify air. About one per cent
of helium is obtained by this process.
The perfection of this process of
helium production is so recent an ac-
c plishment that there has been no
o~ortunity to test these helium fill-
ed ballons. The premature armistice
prevented their use by America in
the present war.
PROF. C. H. FESSENDEN RE-
TURNS FROM LONG ABSENCE
Prof. Charles H. Fessenden of' the
mechanical engineering departmentI
returned this week to the University
after a leave of absence. Professor
Fessenden left the University in Au-
gust, 1917, with a commission of cap-1
tain in the engineering corps of the
U. S. army. He was ordered to Phila-
delphia, where he was given charge of
the construction of an extensive addi-
tion to the Frankfort arsenal.
The arsenal was engaged during the
war in the production of small arms
and ammunition, and of artillery and
fire control instruments.
Later Captain Fessenden was plac-
ed in complete charge of the depart-
ments of plumbing and printing of the
electrical work of the arsenal.

LOCAL PROFESSOR SENT
TO SOUTH AMERIC BY US.
DR. W. L. SCHURZ ACCEPTS POST
AS FOREIGN TRADE COM-
MISSIONER
Dr. W. L. Schurz, assistant professor1
of Latin American history at the Uni-
versity, returned last week fromt
Washington for a short visit, prior to
his departure next month for South<
America as United States trade com-
missioner to Paraguay and Bolivia.
Dr. Schurz is well informed on con-
ditions in Latin America, and will in-
vestigate industrial and agriculturalf
activity, as well as the mines, railroadI
and trade situations for the govern-
ment. While his official position will-
include only the two countries men-
tioned, he plans an extensive trip over
the continent, and expects to spend a
year and a half in his work.
To Visit Brazilian Capital
Sailing from New York about March
1, Dr. Schurz will go first to Brazil,
spending a few days in Rio de Janeiro
before continuing by sea to Buenos
Aires in the Argentine. His route then
takes him up the Paraguay River into
Paraguay, where he will spend several
months at Asuncion, Villa Rica, and in
the Gran Chaco.
On completion of his work in this
country he will continue up the river,
cutting across to Santa Cruz and Co-
chabamba in Bolivia, and then detour-
ing up the Mamore, at the headwaters
of the Amazon, into the rubber coun-
try. Returning southwestward by the
Beni'River, he will stop at La Paz and
the old silver center, Potosi. This trip
in Bolivia with stops will take about a
year, and will cover over three thous-
and miles, part of which will be made
on mule through the wilderness. From
Bolivia he will travel by rail into
Chile, and then by steamer up the
western coast through the Panama Ca-
nal and to New York.
Specially Fitted for Work'
Dr. Schurz left the University last
Sepember to take up work in Wash-
ington on the Colonel House' inquiry
in connection with the Latin American
division of the department of com-
merce. He has made an intensive study
of South America, and because of his
special fitness Vas chosen by the gov-
ernment for this position.
Dr. Schurz will return to Michigan
when the work is completed to resume
his place on the faculty of the his-
tory department.
STONER BACK FROM
WASHINGTON D. C.
Prof. W. Gordon Stoner of the Law
school has resumed his work in that
department after four months' ser-
vice in the engineering division of the
motor transport corps at Washington,
D. C.
He was transferred in October to
this branch of service after serving
for some time as captain in the am-
bulance section, supply division of the
surgeon general's office. He retain-
ed the same rank after being trans-
ferred to the motor corps and was
later promoted to majr.
At the time of his release from ser-
vice, Professor Stoner was in charge
of organization and administrative
work in the motor transport corps.
Profs. W. T. Fishleigh of the auto-
mobile engineering department, W. C.
Hoad of the sanitary engineering de-
partment, and C. S. Berry of the edu-

cation department were other Mich-
igan men stationed at the capital at
the same time as Professor Stoner.
LIEUT. L. J BAUER, EX-'19A,
KILLED IN PRACTICE FLIGHT
Lieut. Lawrence J. Bauer, ex-'19A,
was killed in France two days after
the signing of the armistice, accord-
ing to word just received here. Bauer
was an observer with an American
day-bombing flying squadron, and his
death occurred during a practice
flight.
The machines were flying on a nar-
row field at one side of which was
a large clump of bushes. On the day
of his death, Bauer and his pilot en-
countered a heavy wind and were
forced to steer into the bushes where
their machine was brought safely to a
stop. A plane following Bauer's ma-
chine tried to clear the bushes but,
failing to do so, struck Bauer as he
was climbing out of his machine. He
was hurled about 30 feet and his
back broken.
Bauer had taken his bombing train-
ing at the American school at Cler-
mont-Ferrand, France, and served as
an instructor for two months.
An all-campus mixer will be given
by the Girls' Glee club, Saturday P.
M., Feb. 22, at Barbour gymnasium.-
Adv.

"Y" CABINET PLANS FORUM TO
DISCUSS WORLD PROBLEMS
A meeting of last year's student Y.
M. C. A. cabinet has been called for 1
o'clock Saturday afternoon in Lane
hall by the president, A. C. Crockett,
'19.
One of the plans under consideration
by the cabinet is the organization of
an open forum to discuss world condi-
tions and problems. This organization
will hold weekly meetings every Sun-
day night at Lane hall.
A meeting of the forum will be ad-
dressed at 9 o'clock Sunday night by
Bishop Thomas Nicholson of the
Methodist Episcopal church.
An all-campus mixer will be given
by the Girls' Glee club, Saturday P.
M., Feb. 22, at Barbour gymnasium.-
Adv.
ARCADE DANCINGLCLASS
The beginner's class'
for college 'men and
women which me eft
Tues. and Thurs. at 7
p. m starts tonight.
Enroll at 7 p. M.
Lessons are exclusively for
4class members. Private les-
sons by appoinnut. For
particulars call 1666-J.
3-
BOARD
BREAKFAST STEAKS
$4.50 $5.50
539 FOREST

S

These famous pen,
cils are the standar
by which all othe
pencils are judged

MARLEY 2 IN
DEVON_2k% IN.
ARRO
\COLLARI
m*XP Ar .fl iuusr mweWr

PIANOS, VICTROLAS AND RECORDS, MARTIN
GUITARS, MANDOLINS AND UKULELES
AND ALL MUSICAL SUPPLIES AT
Schaeberle & Son's Music House
110 S. MAIN STREET PHONE 254-Fl

17 black degrees
6 B softest to 9 H hardest
and hard and medium copying
Look for the VENUSfinish
. .- REEl
Trial Samples of
"""' VENUS Pencih
and Eraser sent
free.
Please enclose 6c in stamps for paekiag
and postage.
American Lead Pencil Co.
215 Fifth Avenue. N. Y.
Dept. D-1l

The Dramatic club of the Univ
of Chicago, will present "Seven
to Baldpate,' on Feb. 28.
I ENU
V4 NCIU

Students of the

University of Michigan are cordially invited
inspect our new liiiL of

Winter Suits
and
Overcoats

Do you want to add an air Of
refinement to your Fraternity
House?
complish this by using our Dinnerware.
Each piece is lined in true color
and bears your Society Emblem

Newest materials, newest models, newest
lowest prices

colorings,

and

710m

P .

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and RUBBERS
BEST QUALITY at LOWEST
PRICES. S..
A B E LEVY
205 N. MAIN ST.
Opposite Postoflaa

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.,

p

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l'
FIN4

Leare Ceps
at
Quarr's and
The Bobt

THE

BLUE

ROOM

ER"V
ERTI

I

AT

WANTED
[ED-Typist to take Associated
ss news at The Michigan Daily,
n 8 to 8:30 every night but Sun-
See Roeser any time today at
Daily.
rED-Furnished suite or apart-
t of three to five rooms with
ate bath for light housekeeping
family of two adults, Refer-
s. Box I, Daily.

LOST
LOST - Tuesday, Feb. 11, either at
Weinberg's Coliseum or on East
University, Sigma Nu fraternity pin.
Finder please call 2553-W and re-
ceive reward.
LOST-Sunday, Feb. 16, Eremite Fra-
ternity pin. Finder please return to
821 E. University or call 2738. Re-
ward offered.
LOST - Between 1020 S. University
and '524 Linden, a Kappa Alpha
Theta pin. Return to 1414 Wash-
tenaw.
LOST- "Acacia" pin bearing initials
W. L. F. Return to 603 S. State St.
or call 783. Reward offered.
LOST-An amethyst rosary last week,
between St. Thomas church and So.
Main St. Call 1483.
LOST-Athletic coupon book; name
inside. Finder please return to
Herbert Suerbach, 537 Church St.

THE HOTEL WHITNEY

Is Now Open to the Public

Everything New
Service a la Ca rte

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ED- An opportunity
Let the Daily restore

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that lost

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rd. Inquire at 314

rooms
South

Evening 5:30 to 7:30

Ave.
FOR SA

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ishings for four
reasonable. Call

Ann Arbor's Finest Dining Roc

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