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February 20, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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P'RESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERTICE

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No. 96.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1919.

PRICE THREE

----------------

INF ORMS, HOUSE
NG SYSTEM MAY GIVE GREAT
BRITAIN CONTROL OF
BALLOTING

TRUSTWORTHY FORCE
ESSENTIAL,-CHURCHILL
England Plans to Make War Physic-
ally Impossible for Germany;
Demands Reparation
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Fe$9.-Criticism of
the constitution of he League of Na-
tions was opened in the house with an
address by Representative Fess of
Ohio, who declared the league mon-
strous and filled with "vicious possi-
bilities."
"Just as soon as the American peo-
ple shall grasp the possibilities," he
said, "there will be such a revolution
of sentiment aroused that any man
who will subscribe to this perpetual
surrender of. this republic's future, to
a vote of foreign nations will be re-
pudiated an enemy to the spirit and
genius of American institutions."
Representative Fess said one of
the principal objections to the league
plan was that it made possible five
votes. for the United Kingdom against
one of the United States by permitting
self-govrning colonies to become in-
dependent colonies.
"The sovereignty of the United
States," he continued, "will be trans-
ferred to a group of European powers
by a mere vote of the league and nat-
ters under consideration by it may
lead to war.,
"No Matter how much the people
may wish to avoid fixing European
affairs, any five of the main members
"an fix the responsibility on this coun-
try and any five the character of our
defensive prdgram." Mr Fess de-
clared that once the United States had
agreed to the plan it would not have
the power to compell changes in the
constitution.
London, Feb. 19.-"The whole effec-
tiveness of the league of nations de-
pends upon the Allies having a trust-
worthy force," said Winston Spencer
Churbhill, secretary of war of Great
Britian,
"We are going to take measures," he
added, "t nake it physically impossi-
ble fo Germany to begin her war of
revenge, at any rate in our life time.
We are going to take a few trust-
wprthy persons well provided with
what rresidlent Wilson would call in-
S trumentlities to keep watch by the
G hine an to make Germany pay rep-
aratioxl for the daiage she has done.
!Plonel hurchill made an appeal
fps th, maintenance of the army and
says that the government intended to
maintain a fpre of 900,000 men dur-
ing the yegr of 191.
"There is no intention of sending a
large Bi3tish force to Russia,'he sai4.
"If sTissia is to be sgved," he added,
"it must be by her own exertions."
"ahuty Ener4Ined i Rankin Home
pr f. T. i. ankin and Mrs. Ran-
kin entertained faculty and Univer-
alty woen Tuesday night, the guest of
honor being Dugald Stuart Walker,
author and illustrator, of New York
city. Mr. Walker illustrates his own
stories and has also illustrated the
fairy stories of Hans Christian An-
derson.
Frsh Mixer Tickets Now on Sale
Tickets for the first Frosh mixer,
which will be held at 2:30 o'clock Sat-
urday, March 8, in Barbour gymna-
slum, are now on sale. The price is
25 Fents.
&

LITS TO RECEIVE
GRADES TOMORROW
Class grades of the students in the!
literary college will be mailed out
either late today or sometime tomor-
row, according to information from'
the registrar's office. The progress in
making out a the cards has been
checked by the delay of some instruct-
ors in handing in the grades to the
registrar's office.
A list of the all-A students will be
ready for publication as soon as the
grade cards are completed, providing
all instructors have forwarded the
marks by that time.
Nurse Enjoys
Stay at .2Jrest
"Conditions at Brest were not near-
ly as bad as we had expected," said
iss Edna Shane, a nurse who has
recently returned from overseas. "We
had been warned before starting for
Brest of the terrible conditions that
we would find there, but instead found
the housing and eating accommoda-
tions quite bearable.
"During the six days that we were
there," continued Miss Shane, "we
stayed at the Y. W. C. A. Of course
every house is crowded and the food
is' very plain because of the lack of
everything but absolute necessities,
but I would complain of nothing.
"Because of both poverty and ig-
norance the sanitary conditions are
very poor all over the ocuntry. Al-
though these same conditions were
met at Brest, I considered Brest su-
perior to the outlying villages. Over-
looking the crowded state of the city,
it was easy to enjoy Brest because of
the quaint people and their houses."
According to Miss Shane, the nurs-
es were treated well by the French
people; She said, "Winning the
hearts of the people lies entirely in
taking the right attitude toward them.
One little girl that I knew was so
grateful for the service that we were
doing, for her country that she in-
sisted on polishing my shoes every
morning."
Miss Shane has been in France for
the past five months connected with
the public health service at Paris.
After the signing of the armistice she
went into No Man's Land with the re-
lief units. Making Chateau Thierry
their headquarters, they traveled to
the villages in the surrounding coun-
try with food and clothes for the
needy. An ambulance was their
means of conveyance and always in-
cluded In its crew were a doctor, an
aide, and a nurse.
The party of 16 nurses of which
Miss Shane was a member returned on
the steamship George Washington.
'0 TICKETS LEFT FOR WASH
INGTON BIRTUDAY DANCE
Students, who wish ,to attend the
Washington's birthday dance to be
given Friday night at the Michigan
Union should purchase their, tickets
soon at the Union desk for over half
of . the 100 tickets to be sold have
been disposed of. The hall will be
specially decorated for the occasion.
The dance promises to be one of
the liveliest affairs In some time for
Shook's special six piece orchestra
has been brought from Detroit. Ad-
mission will be $2 a couple. ~
T. Williams, '17, Visits Ann Arbor
Capt. Theodore Williams, '17, who
has been in Washington for the pastj
year, is in Ann Arbor for a few days.

He organized the department of aero
photography in Washington and at
Cornell university and during the last
few months has been instructor in fly-
ing.
Captain Williams has received his
discharge, and will leave for the east
at the end of the week.
Emily Loman to Represent Y. W. C. A.
Emily Loman, ',19, will represent the
University Y. W. C. A. at the Y. W. C.
A. conference to be held Feb. 20 to
23 at Evanston, Ill. Miss Loman leaves
today for Evanston. Definite programs
for the conference ha-ve not been sent.
Reconstruction will be the theme of
the speakers
C.mpaIgn for Better Oats
The University of Indiana's botan-
ical extension department is about to
launch a campaign among farmers of
that state, the aim of which will be

LibraryChimes Once . )iore
doom Forth The Hour of Day
(By 31. E. B.)
Again the watchless student will be able to go to bed before day-
light and get to class on time. No longer will he sit up till the
milk man comes for fear of retiring before his regular bedtime and
then be late to class for fear of getting there before the instructor,
thus establising a precedent which he does not expect to follow.
But all such worry on the part of the Ingersoll owner and those
without even this sort of timepiece is over; the Library clock
struck again yesterday.' Not such a strike as the Bolshevik or I.
W. W. might instigate-it merely rung out the hours, quarters and
halves.

CHORUS TRYOUTS BRING
ENCOURAGING RESPONSE
DANCING AND ORCHESTRA TRY-
OUTS SCHEDULED FOR MON-
DAY NIGHT
Eighty-one students entered the
lists for places in the Union Opera
chorus at the preliminary tryouts
held last night.
Big men, little men, intermediate
men raised their voices in song, dis-
playing a highly satisfactory number
of voices of good caliber, according
to the opinion of the Union authori-
ties. The majority of good voices
were the property of the larger men,
while the smaller men gave promise
of easily disguising themselves as
chorus ladies.
On next Monday evening the can-
didates for the chorus will take a test
in dancing. At this same time orches-
tra tryouts are to be held. Arrange-
ments have been made whereby the
judges will decide the Opera poster
contest on Saturday afternoon.

COMMITTEES ANNOUNCE ORSOLGTHOW

TICKETS PLACED ON SALE
STORES AND WITH COM-
MITTEEMEN

ATI

20 STUDENTS
ORATORY

SEEK
HONORS,

Twenty orations for the Northern
Oratorical league contest had been
submitted yesterday, according to
Mr. Ray K. Immel, director of the con-
test.;
The manuscripts were written by
Morris Paris, '19; Kelsey Guilfoil,
'20L; Mahlon W. Budd, '19; Alice M.
Hoelzle, '19; Melba G. Bastedo, '19;
Herbert Parzon, '19; James K. Pol-
lock, '20; Ida E. Gratton, '20; Shinji
Yonemoto, '20E; Elmer O. Brinkman,
'20; Carl G. Brandt, '21L; Mo S.
Lee, '20; Hsju C. Tunz, '20; Simon
Shetzer, '21; Alice E. Beckham, '21;
Kathleen Kurrah, '21; Donald C. Shel-
ton, '21; Charles R. Fitzpatrick, '21;
and Earl, Miles, '21.
Brandt and Parzon are honor de-
baters, having participated in previ-
ou's contests,
Two weeks intervene between the
closing date of acceptance of orations,
ard the contests, which will run as
follows: Junior contest, March
6; Sophomore, March. 7; Senior,
March 8.
Mr. Immel says that it is not
thoroughly understood by many that
every writer of qn oration will have'
a chance to deliver it. The judges
will make their decision on thought
and composition at the same time that
they judge delivery, he said..,
Selects Honorable Discharge Button
An army discharge button has re-
cently been selected - by General
March, chief-of-staff, which will be
worn by discharged soldiers. This
button will be issued to each man who

I

Committees for the Spotlight vaude-
ville to be held Friday, Feb. 28, in
Hill auditorium for the benefit of the
American University union in Paris,,
were announced yesterday by Carl T.
Hogan, '20E, general chairman. The
person#el follows:
Car r. Hogan, '20E, general chair-
man; illiam P. Favorite, '20E, stage
manager; William A. Leitzinger, '20,
advertising and program manager;
LeGrand A. Gaines, Jr., '21E, assist-
ant; Mark K. Ehlbert, '20, publicity
manager; Clayton S. Shoemaker,
chairman of ticket sales; Edwin Cru-
ger, '20, chairman of property com-
mittee.
Howard N. Collins, '20E, Waldo G.
Harbert, '20E, and William R. Fraz-
er, '20E, ticket sales committee; D.
D. Snyder, '21, F. R. Storrer, '21E,
W. T. Roat, '21, stage committee; T.
F. Carson, '20, W. L. Chapman, '21E,
and D. B. Stratton, '21E, property
committee.
Tickets selling at 35 cents each
have been placed on sale at various
shops around the campus. They may
also be secured from committeemen.
25 WOMEN ENROLL FOR NEW
COURSE IN HEALTH NURSING6
Twenty-five women have enrolled
in the new course in public health
nursing which is under the supervi-
sion of Prof. Nora B. Barnes. This
enrollment is over twice as much as
was expected due to standards of ad-
mission.
Those specializing in this work must
be graduate nurses from an approved
school, or senior nurses in the Uni-
versity. The literary and medical de-
partments are offering courses partic-
ularly planned for the public health
curriculum and offer subjects of in-
terest to the nurses.
TOASTMASTERS AT BANQUET
WELCOME SIX NEW INITIATES
J. E. Chenot, '19L, welcomed the
initiates at the initiation banquet of
the Toastmasters held Feb. 14 at the
Catalpa Inn. M. S. Towar, '19, re-
sponded for the initiates, who were:
F. Cort Bell, '21L; M. S. Towar, '19;
R. H. Kheun, "19E; A. G. Goetz, '21M;
C. L. Roeser, '19; K. H. Velde, '20;
W. G. Harbert, '20E; P. S. Nertney,
'20.
Columbia Raises Entrance Standards
Columbia university is to have more
strict standards for admission. Pro-

MUST APPLY NOW
TO MAKE UP EXAMS
Unavoidable absences from the fin-
al examinations of the first semester
may be made up by the students pro-
viding they make application this
week to Registrar Arthur G. Hall for
the privilege of taking other examina-
tions.
Each examination will be made out
by the instructor in that course and
will Abe given under. the direction of
the Registrar in his office during the
fourth week of this 'semester. Blanks
for the petitions may be filled out by
the students this week only.
Farewell to Thee
OldJMud Streets
Ungracefully galoshed members of
sororities situated midway between
the campus and Ypsilanti may soon
relegate their galoshes to the scrap
heap.
Shock absorbers will become less
necessary on taxicabs plying their
trade between said sororities and the,
Union and the Armory.
Campus Romeos desiring to emu-
late the example of Sir Walter Ra-
leigh will find ferer puddles over
which to spread their broadcloth
coats (sheepskins).
Ex-gobs returning to the Univer-
sity will find Ann Arbor's streets less
reminiscent of the high seas.
And all this because of the city'
council's decision to pave the streets
surrounding the campus. The pav-
ing program for the coming year was
mapped out at a council meeting held
Monday night.
The streets to be paved are: East
University, from Washtenaw to South
University; South University, from
State to Washtenaw; Catherine, from
Main to Fifth; Fourth, from Ann to
Kingsley; Detroit, from Fourth to
Catherine; and Broadway, from the
Michigan Central viaduct to Swift
street.
"IT'S NOTHING" SAYS'
WOUNDED PREMIER
Paris, Feb. 19.-"It's nothing," de-
clared Georges Clemenceau, French
premier, when struck by three of an
assassin's bullets today.
Oe bullet lodged under the left
shoulder, missing the spinal cord and
the lung, the other two bullets caus-
ed scarcely more than abrasions on
the right arm and hand.
In all seven shots were fired at
him point blank by the assassin,
Emuel Cottin, known in anarchistic
circles as Milou, who was arrested
directly after the shooting.
Premier Clemenceau leaned forward
in his machine facing the door in a
clearly visible position when the
shots were fired. He continued his
movement to open the door, which
he did with his wounded arm. As
the premier stepped to the roadway,
the police were already struggling
with the assassin. b -
The premier, without a collapse,
started to walk towards the front
door of his home. A number of per-i
sons came running to assist him. "It
is not serious this time," said the
premier in reply to inquiry. Lean-
ing on the shoulder of one of the do-
mestics, he walked up stairs to his
bedroom, and began joking with his
servants.
To Marshal Foch, who called dur-
ing the day, he sai'd, "I have dodged

bigger ones than that at the front."
His condition is satisfactory accord-
ing to physicians.
Large Number of Freshmen Evident
An unusually large enrollment in
freshman is noticed this semester as
shown by the fact that four fresh-
man rhetoric classes are necessary.
It was originally planned to have
only one for the second semester. This,
large enrollment is due to the great
number of S. A. T. C. men who, aft-
er leaving the University, are re-en-
tering.
Japanese Club to Hold Banquet
The Japanese club is making plans
for a banquet to be given on Wash-
ington's birthday. President and Mrs.
Hutchins, the deans of the various
colleges and their wives, and those
who have shown special interest in,
the Japanese students are to be the
guests of honor.

POWERFUL SPIRITS
AGIN SEEK PATH!
TO DIRY MiCHIGA
SECRET SERVICE MEN TO TA
STEPS TO HALT RENEWED
TRAFFIC
FREED RUM - RUNNERS
RESUME FORMER WOF
Federal Laws To Be Invoked
State Authorities to Curb
Offenders
"The liquor, boys, is nigh," o
more.
Ann Arbor as well as Detroit
seeing the hurried departure of m
of its old crowd and also their reti
with beaming countenances. "E
as rolling off a log," is Ihat they ha
to say, and well they may, for t
activities of the state constables hA
been suspended and county offici
are not molesting them.
All rum-runners in the Det
lock-ups have been released; the r
jority of them are now to be fo
along the sodden path that oozes fr
Toledo to choking Michigan vacuui
The question that is taxing lawy
at present is whether or not th
former violators will have redr
against the county or state for unh
fully acquainting them with the
known query: "Got a cigarette,
whatcha in for?" One is already t
ing steps to recover the 6,000 bott
of beer that were seized in his hot
With state officials powerless, a
federal men not yet on the job,
morale of Michigan is receiving a h
blow in the shape of a fiery :
stream. All this controversy me
a much bethumbed page in the l
tory of the origin and abolishment
the so-called "gloom eradicator." '
great war and liquor in Michigan
vie with each other for first place
the interest of children of the twe
first century.
Toledo, Feb. 19.-Secret service
began a campaign to halt the traffic
liquor between the states of Mlchig
and Ohio today, since the recent
cision of the Michigan supreme co
has caused such a tremendous flow
liquor into Michigan.
The district attorneys declared t
they would invoke federal acts,
of which forbids having intoxicat
liquors in a dry state for perso
use, and the other authorizing p
sonal search in cases of suspic
without warrants.
NEW CLASSES NECESSITATED
BY INCREASED ENROLLE
Owing to the number of incom
students this semester, the num
of beginning physics classes has be
increased from four to eight. Q
sections are held as originally p1
ned at all hours of the morning,
two sections are held at each 11
instead of one.
The same holds true of the labo
tory work in which it has been n
essary to increase from five to 1X2,
perhaps 14 sections. According
Prof. U. H. Williams, this large
rollment is due to the irregulari
of the last semester, and the gene
acknowledgment of the fact t
more attention should be paid to
sciences.
Mortarboard Elects New Ofioers

Mortarboard elected new officers
its last meeting held Tuesday night
the Alpha Phi house. The officE
elected were: president, Groe
Gaines, '19; vice-president, Kather
Kilpatrick, '21L; secretary, Mar
Pinkerton, '19; treasurer, Mar
Guernsey, '19.
NO CLASSES SATURDAY
Classes in all of the colleges
of the University will be sus-
pended on Washington's birth-
day, Saturday, Feb. 22. The
registrar's and. the treasurer's
offices will remain open Satur-
day morning and any student
who has not yet registered may
do so at that time.
HARRY B. HUTCHINS,
President.

has been honorably discharged from spective students must pass a moral
the army and will be worn with civ- and mental test, similar to that given
ilian clothes only. S. A. T. Q. men in the army and must present refer-

I-

ATTENTION! JOURNALISTS!
Mpn who are desirous of work-
ing on the editorial side of the
Michigan Daily should call at
The Daily office after 2 o'clock
this aftern'oon and ask for H. C.

will in all probability be able to pro-
cure these buttons in the near future
at the Registrar's office.
Dr. J. Breakey Returns from Service
Dr. James Breakey, formerly of the
medical college, who has been re-
cently discharged from military serv-
ice overseas, was present at the Ro-
tary club dinner Wednesday at Lane
hall.
Dr. Breakey returned with the com-
mission of major.
Professor Goldsmith Elected
Prof. Goldwin Goldsmith of the
University of Kansas department of
architectural engineering has been
elected vice-president of the Kansas
Society of Architects,.

ences along with a health certificate
and a photograph when a personal in-
terview is impossible.
Professor Is Delegate to Marmora
Mr. George D. Herron, a former
professor at Iowa university, has been
appointed as one of the two Ameri-
can representatives on the Marmora
mission, which will meet in confer-
ence with representatives of the Rus-
sian governments at 'Princess Is-
lands.
"Y" Finds Work and Rooms for Many
Three hundred positions have been
found for University students by the
employment bureau of the Y. M. C. A.
maintained at Lane hall. About 50 stu-
dents are still'without employment.

iring to try-out for the
staff of The Daily call
siness offices between
'clock this afternoon.

-.----. 'to produce more and better oats.

,r

t

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