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February 19, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-19

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ASSOCIATED
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VOL. XXIX. No. 94. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1919. PRICE THREE (

SENATORS START
OPPOSING LEAGUE
OF NATIONSTODAY
BORAH DECLINES TO DINE WITH
PRESIDENT WILSON AT
WHITE HOUSE
DEBATES EXPECTED TO
BREAK OUT TOMORROW
Criticism Looked for from Radical
Group Fighting Scheme of
Internationalization

S.A.T.C. ACCOUNT
TO BE SETTLED
Within the next few weeks the Un-
iversity will submit to the government
an account for all the expenses which
it incurred during the stay of the S.
A. T. C. This will include such ex-
pense as was incurred in the con-
struction of temporary buildings, re-
pairs on fraternity houses and many
other items.
Accounts must first be sent to the
military headquarters in Ann Arbor
where they will be checked and ap-
proved. From here they will be sent
to the district quartermaster for set-
tlement. Major Ralph H. Durkee ex-
pects to be here to sign for the local
office. The accounts will probably be
ready for inspection in 10 days.
Lieut. E. J. Stotter, local quarter-
master, is engagedo in shipping some
of the equipment that was used here.
This includes signal corps apparatus
and also government-owned motors
which were used in the motor repair
school.
HADPANE POSTERS
ADVERTISE VAUDEVILLE
MARGARET JEWELL, '20, PAINTS
PLACARDS NOW IN
WINDOWS

Washington, Feb. 18.Opposition in
the senate to the league of nationsI
began today.j
Senator Borah of Idaho, a republi-
can member of the foreign relationsj
committee, formally declined to ac-
cept Wilson's invitation to the White
House dinner Feb. 26. Senator Poin-
dexter of Washington announced that
he would speak tomorrow in criti-
cism of the plan. General debates
may follow the address.
"League Unconstitutional"
Senator Vardaman, of Mississippi,
Domocrat, declared the league was
unconstitutional, and criticised Pres-
ident Wilson for asking congress to
remain silent on the subject until he
returned to Washington.
Several Republican members of the
senate committee stated privately to-
day that they would not regard them-
selves bound by confidences and that
they would accept the President's in-
vitation with reluctance.
Senator Borah is one of a group of
senators, which includes some Dem-
ocrats as well as Republicans, who
oppose any sort of internationalization
and whose opposition to the league as
proposed has been regarded as a
foregone conclusion.
Debate in the senate, which has
been exptted to break out at any
moment in spite of the President's re-
quest that it be withheld until after
his meeting with the committeemen,
probably will begin tomorrow.

CHORUS EMINENT WOMEN'S LEAGUE
IN UNION, OPERA PETITIONS FORHTAX
Consists of 16 Boys and 24 Girls; League Wants Board of Regents to
Director Considers It Grant Tax Right on All
Most Essential Women
INITIAL CHORUS TRYOUTS TO COMPULSORY MEMBERSHIP
BE HELD AT 7:80 TONIGHT WITH $1.00 FEE ASKED FOR
Initial chorus tryouts for the That membership in the Women's
Union opera will be held at 7:30 league be compulsory and that $1.00
o'clock this evening in the old Union to cover membership be added to the
building. The aspirants will be test- entrance fee of each woman, will Rbe
ed as to both dancing and singing the basis of the petition which the
ability. board of directors of the Women's
The chorus of the 1919 opera will league will present at the meeting of
consist of 40 members, 16 boys and the Board of Regents Feb. 28.
24 girls, 12 from the latter going to Want' Blanket Tax
make up the pony ballet. The board plans to make member-
Mr. E. Mortimer Schuter, director ship in the league compulsory, just
of the opera, said, yesterday in re- as all men students are members of
gard to the importance of the chorus: the Michigan Union by virtue of the
"Nearly all the great actors and act- blanket tax of $3.00. Practically all
resses of musical comedy have risen University women and many nurses
from the chorus. It is the best now belong to the league, and it is
school for a musical comedy aspirant. thought that much time and effort can
The majority of managers always be saved by adopting the expedient
keep their eyes on their respective of a blanket tax.
choruses with an idea of picking Desire Dormitories
some member for future use as a ju- If the petition is granted, the money
venile, ingenue, or character actor. which is received at the beginning of
Chorus Is Important next year may be used to secure more
"In the case of the chorus with the women's dormitories.
present opera, bhey'play a most im- The petition was approved by thef
portant part in the making of it, as house of representatives of the board
they are required to do bits of acting at its last meeting.
which are incidental to the action of
the play: They are not merely
brought on the stage and thrown in'l.a s $
as a song and dance number to mill Repeals Secrets
in a gap in place of dialogue.
Authors Careful
"It is a tendency of some of the At last all the mystery is stripped
so-balled authors of books of musical from the campus secret societies, and
comedies, when their master brains all their dread ceremonies are laid
run out of material for dialogue, to before the world.
say, 'Oh, well, I'll just run in a musi- Brush and pen have been combined
cal number and bring the audience to portray the inner workings of fra-
out of their seats.' I am glad to say ternities and sororities to the unspoil-
that this is not true of Mr. Haines' ed frosh. "The Freshmen Bible"even
book, and I repeat that the chorus is tells him or her how to act and whato
most essential in the making of what to expect when entertained at the
I consider an excellent, play with domiciles of certain organizations.
music. One can also learn how the sorori-9
"The opera for this year has a new ty girls get all the A's. It can't bel
ralle~d vminv the nrofessor _but-

PROFESSOR, RISKS
LIFE IN RESEARCH
Capt. Paul H. DeKruif, who has
been overseas with the medical corps,
has returned to the University, where
he will resume his activities as as-
sistant professor of bacteriology.
Although Captain De Kruif is si-
lent as to his work in France, fellow
officers have asserted that on several
occasions he was nearly killed while
experimenting in shell craters in No
Man's Land to reduce the loss of life
caused by gas gangrene. Along this
line he is said to have made valuable
discoveries.
Captain De Kruif intends to con-
tinue his research work in the Uni-
versity. In New York, where he em-
barked,.he stated that he was bringing
with him trillions of microbes-a fact
which the custom officials were will-
ing to believe without searching the
knapsacks containing the germs.
LETTERS FROM AVIATORS
WANTED BY1GOVERNMENT

STORIES SHOULD BE SENT
PRESIDENT HUTCHIN'S
OFFICE

TO

G.O.P. CONVENTION
NAMES WOMAN FOE
STATE BOARD0 SEA
DORA H. STOCKMAN OF LANSIN
NOMINEE FOR BOARD OF
AGRICULTURE
UNIVERSITY REGENTS
HAVE NO OPPOSITIO
Governor Sleeper Urges Support
$15,000,000 Good Roads
Bond
(By Associated Press)
Lansing, Feb. 18.-For the fir
time in the history of Michigan pol
tics, a woman was chosen as a nor
inee for a state elective office.
Miss Dora H. Stockman of Lansit
was nominated today by the Repub)
can state convention here, as one
the parties to the candidates for mei
bership to the board of agriculture a
the election of April 7. The conve:
tion gave women one-third of the rep
resentation in the state central com
mittee.
The platform adopted by the par
declared for stricter immigration law
deportation of interned aliens with ti
exclusion of those returning to Eu
rope to join enemy countries.
The nominations of the party are a
follows: For the board of agricd
ture, L. Whitney Watkins of Jack
son, Miss Dora Stockman of Lansing
regents of the University of Mich
gan, Benjamin F. Hanchett, Gran
Rapids, Dr. Lucius L. Hubbard c
Houghton; justices of the supren
court, Russel Ostrander, Lansin
John E. Bird, Adrian; state board
education, Frank Cody, Detroit; su
perintendent of public instructio
Clarence M. Keeler, Mt. Clemens.
All nominations were made by a
clamation except for the board of ag
riculture. A. J. Dohtrey of Clair
withdrew his candidacy for the offH
in favor of Miss Stockman. E. Whi
ney Watkins defeated Robert Grahar
who sought renomination withol
roll call. Every county in the stal
was represented by at least one won
an delegate and they all took an ac
tive part in the busines of the cot
vention.
Governor Sleeper addressed tk
convention, urging support of $15
000,000 good roads bond resolution
Speaking of the prohibition law, hi
said that a permanent state constabu
lary to run down whiskey runnel
should be established.

Caruso to Make'
Debut Jarch

Vividly colored posters announcing
the spotlight vaudeville, to be given
Friday, Feb. 8, in Hill auditorium,
for the benet of the American Univer-
sity union in Paris, have appeared in
the windows of the campus shops. The
placards were designed by Margaret
Jewell, '20, who has also hand-paint-
ed a number of them with water-col-
ors.
Unusual Poster
The poster represents a romatic-
visaged youth singing to the tune of
and playing. a stringed instrument the
like of which cannot be found even in
Stearns collection. It is said to be re-
lated ot the banjuke, violin, mandolin,
and guitar. The exact identity of the
instrument in question, however, is
not a matter of importance on the art-
ist is allowed a certain amount of po-
etio license.
The poster is attractive regardless
of liberties taken by the artist, and it
is xexpected to be quite an effective
means of creating a demand for tick-
ets when they are put on sale.
Ten Acts Scheduled
The poster promises "ten big acts,"
and present indications point to the
promise being kept. Music, magic,
dancing, and specialties will be in-
cluded on the varied program which
will be offered at the vaudeville.
The program itself, together with
the fact that the show is to be pro-
duced for the benefit of the American
University union, is expected to bring
a capacity audience to Hill auditor-
ium.
Economics Essay
Contest Opens

With the view of compiling the ad-
ventures as well as the historical in-
formation of the American fliers
overseas, the director of milita''y
aeronautics of the war department, in
a letter to President Harry B. Hutch-
ins, asks the co-operation of the Uni-
versity in assembling personal stor-
ies of the aviators who have come
from this University.
Information Valuable
"The information thus assembled,"
says the letter, "is important to the
air service of the country and may
be of yet more intimate concern to
the locality and to the instittuion with
which you are associated. It seems not
unlikely that the better part of each
story is contained in letters to friends
and relatives.
"Such informal records may supply
information of historical value to be
had from no other source, information
which should find a place in the writ-
ten history of the country."
All Letters Desired{

31

Enried Caruso, the distinguished
Italian tenor of the Metropolitan
Opera company, will make his Ann
Arbor debut Monday evening, March
3, when he will be heard in a miscel-
laneous program of arias and pa-
triotic songs.
During the many years that Mr.
Caruso has been the leading star of
the Metropolitan Opera company, he
has seldom appeared in concert. In
fact, during the last 10 years he has
been heard in concert in the West and
Middle West not more than eight or
10 times.
Postponed Concert
Last fall when arrangements were
perfected for a brief tour, Ann Arbor
was fortunate in being able to secure
one of his four appearances. Owing
to the state-wide ban on public gath-
erings because of the influenza epi-
demic, it was necessary to ve up the
concert at that time.
The significance of his coming here
will be appreciated when it is real-
ized that it is the first time in the
history of his long career that he has
left New York during the opera sea-
f son.
Same Program
He will give the same program as
announced last fall and will be as-
sisted by the same artists: Nina Mor-
gana, the remarkable soprano; Elias
Breeskin, the young Russian violin-
ist, will also be heard in the same
program, while piano accompaniments
will be played by Salvatore Fuccito
and Isaac VanGrove. r
Three Lits Asked to Withdraw
Three students will be asked to
withdraw from the College of Litera-
ture, Sciehtce, and the Arts by action
of the committee on delinquences last
night.

.I

story, a new plot, with excellent music
and catchy lyrics."
21 NURSES BENEFIT
BY SCHOLARSHIPS
Of the 23 nurses who have enroll-
ed in the public health nursing course
to be given this semester in the Uni-
versity, all but two were sent on
scholarships given by hospitals, or-
ganizations, individuals, and Red
Cross chapters in the state.
One of the nurses, Miss Edna Shane
of Jackson, has recently returned
from overseas where she was en-
gaed in public health work among the
civilian poulation. Another of the
nurses has just been released from
duty in a general military hospital in
New York.
More nurses are expected to enroll
at the registrar's office in the near
future.
The course is being given under the
direction of Prof. Dora M. Barnes.
The first phase of the work, an emer-
gency course, will extend over a pe-
riod of four months and will be di-
vided between theoretical problems
and field work in neighboring cities
and towns. The field work will in-
clude the work of a general visiting
nurse and also specialized forms of
public health nursing.-
Those eligible for the course are
graduate registered nurses and senior
pupil nurses of approved schools. The
course is offered to fill the demand
for specially trained public health
nurses and, judging from the present
enrollment, it will be a permanent
one in the University.

ca,..,t, p a.ll5fg the pruie Jurs, UUL-
How the bird who sports seven pins,
gets away with it, and how the female
of the species grabs 14, is also reveal-
ed. It's a gift!
Seriously speaking, however, the
February issue is filled with witty
verse and pointed drawings. The cov-
er is a study in green and symbolizes
the whole.

A prize of $1,000 is offered by the
National Industrial Conference board
for the best essay dealing with in-
dustrial economics, the subjects to be
from a list of eight formulated by the
board. '
While all these assigned subjects
deal with labor and industry, they
cover a wide range of important
questions. They include: what means)
are there-for securing; adequate rep-
resentation of workers in the deter-
mining of laboring conditions and
settlement of disputes; causes and
remedies for unemployment; high
wages and the means of securing ef-
ficient workers for this highly paid
employment; wages related to govern-
ment interference, to cost of living
to efficiency and contentment of la-
bor; open versus closed shop, and re-
sponsibility of trade unions and em-
p!oyers' associations.
Manuscripts will be received by the
National Industrial Conference board,
15 Beacon Street, Boston, on or be-
fore July 1, 1919.

ANNE M. MULHERON, '06, GOES
TO FRANCE TO BE LIBRARIAN
Anne M. Mulheron, '06, sailed Feb.
15 for France on the steamship La
France, where she will be engaged in
library work.
Miss Mulheron is one of the nine
libjarians in the United States se-
lected by the American Library as-
sociation to go overseas with the
American Expeditionary Forces to es-
tablish regional libraries. These li-
braries will serve the men engaged in
recoustruction work with reading
matter in the same manner that the
camp libraries have in this country.
ANNOUNCEMENTS OF SUMMER
SCHOOL COURSES OUT SOON
University officials are taking ample
measures to provide courses for Sum-
mer Session students so that they
may take the same studies that they
are now pursuing. Dean E. H.
Krauss, in charge of the Summer
Session, says that men who have been
in the service will be assisted as much
as possible.
An abridged summer school an-
nouncement will be off the press by
March 5, and by the end of March the
complete list of all classes and sched-
ules will be ready.
TO REQUEST WAR TROPHIES
AS MARKS FOR NEW HIGHWAY
Requests will be sent to the gov-
ernment to provide captured German
cannons and other war trophies to be
installed along the line of the Vic-
tory highway. The route starts at
Chicago, through Michigan clity to St.
Joseph, Paw Paw, Kalamazoo, Battle
Creek, Charlotte, Lansing, Owosso,
Flint, Emmett and Port Huron. A
branch runs from Owosso, touching
Chesning St. Charles, Saginaw, and
over the river route to Bay City.

Reconstruction aides for military
hospitals are needed in large numbers
for immediate service according to an
urgent call sent out from the sur-
geon general's office of the war de-
partment.
These workers are to be divided in-
to four classes: aides in physio-
therapy (women), medical social
service workers (women), aides in oc-
cupational therapy (men and wom-
en), and academic aides (men and
women).
Applicants must be between 25
and 40 years of age. Aides must be
either citizens of the United States
or subjects of one of the countries
allied with the United States against
Germany.
Warning is given that considerable'
sacrifice of personal comforts is en-
tailed in this work. The 'personal
qualifications of reconstruction aides
are stated as those of good teachers:
knowledge and skill in the particular
occupation to be taught, attractive
and forceful personality, teaching
ability, sympathy, tact, judgment and
industry.
All applicants should communicate
at once with the division of physical
reconstruction, surgeon general's of-
fice, war department, Washington,
D. C.
Prevent Students from Seeing Games
No people are allowed to witness the
basketball games at the University
of Texas this season on account of
the influenza.

The director of military aeronau-
tics therefore makes the request that
his office be furnished with copies of
such letters, or excerpts from them,
and likewise with copies of any stu-
dent or alumni publications that have
contained articles pertinent to this.
subject.
President Hutchins desires that all
letters, or copies of such, be either
brought or sent to his office, where
they will be filed and later forwarded
to the director3of military aeronau-
tics.
U. S. SEEKS AIDES
FOR MEDICAL WORK

Oratory Helps End
War--Sh a rfman
"Oratory has been an important
factor in bringing the great world
war to a close," declared Prof. I.
Leo Sharfman of the economics de-
partment in his address, "Temper-
ance," at the annual banquet of the
Adelphi House of Representatives held
last night at the Allenel hotel. "The
success of the many Liberty Loan and
War Savings Stamp campaigns and
those stimulating recruiting has been
due largely to the eloquence of the
men picked for their marked ora-
torical ability, who have conducted
them."
Mr. Ray K. Immel of the oratorical
department spoke on the future of de-
bating at Michigan. The past year
has been marked by its lack of de-
bates and Mr. Immel assured the
Adelphi that with the new semester
oratory would be restored to its pre-
war basis.
R. C. Jacobson Moved to Lane Hall
R. C. Jacobson, University pastor
for students who attend the Methodist
church, has moved his offices from the
First M. E. church to Lane hall. His
phone number is 2573.

CHANGES IN ELECTIONS
Unavoidable changes in elec-
tions can be made Thursday
and Friday, Feb. 20 and 21, in
Registrar Hall's office.

Wood Meets Those Taking Economics
Students who t-ok economics 3 last
semester and who wish to continue
this course this semester may do so
by registering for economics 18. Prof.
A. E. Wood would like to meet all
those who want to take the work in
room 205 today, Economics building.

Radical Aliens Face Deportation
Washington, Feb. 18. - Any alien
found advocating destruction of prop-
erty or overthrowing of the govern-
ment will be deported under the pro-
vision of the immigration act of Feb.
5, 1917. This announcement was
made today by Secretary of Labor
Wilson in a letter rebuking a Brook-
lyn lodge for protesting against the
deportation of 68 alien radicals.
The secretary denied that they were
being deported without due process of
law and said that they had been given
fair trials.

Try-outs for Daily Staff Wanted
Men desiring to try-out for the
business staff of The Daily call
at the business offices between.
5 and 6 o'clock this afternoon.

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