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February 18, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THE 'WEA
PROBABLY
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SSOCIATI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
E.RVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 93.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1919.

PRICE THREE

OPERA REHEARSING6
PROGRESSES WELL:.
STAT SECOND CT
TRYOUTS SELECTED FOR TYPES
BET CAST NOT SET; COSTUMES
TO FEATURE
DIRECTOR ENTHUSIASTIC
OVER BOOK AND TALENT
Fine Spirit Manifested by Tryouts;
Director Confident of Great
Success
M. E. Mortimer Scuter, who arriv-
ed Feb. 3 to take charge of producing
the 1919 Union opera, has made use
of the examination period for the
thorough rehearsing of the first act.
Such progress has been made that the
director was able to begin work on
act two at the hehearsal held last
night.
The first chorus tryouts will be
held at 7:30 'clock Wednesday even-
ing in the old Union. Both singing and
dancing tests will bebheld at this time.
Men who: have not been notified that
they have been chosen for cast-parts
are asked to appear at the chorus try-
outs, as many of them are considered
desirable for minor roles.
Posters to Be in Feb. 22
Posters for the opera must be hand-
ed in at the Union desk not later than
noon, Feb. 22, as they will be judged
thersame afternoon. The artists are
warned not to place their names on
the posters, but to include their names
in envelopes marked by some symbol
which also distinguishes the poster.
Some of the orchestrations have al-
ready arrived, and it is expected that
the majority of them will be here when
the orchestra tryouts are held at 7:30
o'clock next Monday evening in the old
Union.
Director Pleased
Mr. Schuter, in speaking of the prog-
ress made on the opera, stated that he
was very much pleased both with the
book itself and with the talent with
which he is working.
"The book is one of the best that I
have seen for a long time, and it has
a much stronger plot than most of the
operas now being played," stated Mr.
Schuter. "I feel that the public has
just got to the point where they have
been so surfeited with dancing and
scenic embellishment that they are
only too glad to listen to an excellent
book with some dancing. This has been
demonstrated by the phenomenal suc-
cess of "Maytime" and similar plays
so cordially received by the theater-
going public all over the country.
Excellent Acting Talent
"As far as the material here is con-
cerned, I think we really have some
excellent acting talent to fit the char-
acters which Mr. Haines has so clear-
ly drawn," continued the director. "I
feel that, if the spirit manifested at
the past few rehearsals is continued,
this year's show will turn out to be the
banner opera presented by the Union.
"The play lends itself to extremely
artistic settings, as its locale is in
South America," added Mr. Schuter.
"The.costumes will also prove a great
feature of the show."
In conclusion the director stated
that the characters had already been
picked for types, alt-hough the cast is
not set.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE INLUDED IN
STATE FEDERATION NEETING

Doris McDonald, '19, and Emily
Powell, '19, Jeave today for Battle
Creek where they will represent the
Women's league at the annual meet-
ing of the State Federation of Wom-
en's clubs. The convention was pre-
ceded by a meeting. of all women col-
lege graduates residing in Mkchigan.
This meeting was attended b, Dean'
Myra B. Jordan who returned last
night from Battle Creek.{
The convention will be held Feb. 11,
19, and 20. Reconstruction will be the
chief topic of discussion.

U. S. REINFORCES
NORTH RUSSIA A.E.F.
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 17.-Steps toward
improving the situation of the Ameri-
can and Allied troops in northern
Russia are about to be taken under
the direction of the supreme war
council.
It is understood that the contribu-
tion of the United States toea supple-
mentary force will be several com-
panies of engineers to -aid in keeping
lines of communication open to the
sea.
Secretary Baker notified the house
that President Wilson had informed
him of the plan and again gave assur-
ance that the American soldiers were
in no danger of being cut off. Steps
toward strengthening the position of
American and Allied troops are taken
as a preliminary to their safe with-
drawal in the near future. Baker de-
clared that all American soldiers
should be out by this spring.
To facilitate the withdrawal Great
Britain is sending 2,400 troops and
the United States about 500 engineers.
e also said that he had been in-
formed that the British felt no appre-
hension as to the situation at Arch-
angel.
Jazz to Feature
Spotlight Show
Ten acts will compose the program
of the Spotlight vaudeville to be given
Friday, Feb. 28, in Hill auditorium,
for the benefit of the American Uni-
versity Union in paris. '
With an unusually large "jazz" or-
chestra, several instrumental num-
bers, and a couple of vocalists, the
program will be essentially musical,
although specialties will not be lack-
ing. Along this line there will be a
magician, an impersonator, and a
dancing stunt.
The parts on the program have been
assigned comparatively early this
year, and the 1919 Spotlight vaude-
ville bids fair to show a greater
smoothness of action than previous
performances have had.
Newest Inlander
.exhibits Talent
The February Inlander is out today.
The feature article is "Russia and
Bolshevism" by Prof. William A.
Frayer of the history department.
Professor Frayer's contribution is a
full discussion of conditions in Rus-
sia before and after the March revolu-
tion. The article is in no way contro-
versial but aims rather to give the
plain facts of the revolution.
Ethel M. Harwood, '19, contributes
an excellent story to the current In-
lander, called "The Reverend Jere-
miah's Mission." It is the story of an
evangelist and is a rather shocking
expose of the methods used by a cer-
tain type of religious exhorter.
"The Utilitarians" is an interesting
fable, done in an original, refreshing
style by Stella Brunt, '22. Miss Brunt
has also contributed a poem called
"The Dreamer." Both Miss Harwood
and Miss Brunt are new writers in the
Inlander.
Besides these articles the Inlander
includes its usual full quota of note-
worthy poems, essays and stories.
ARCHONS TAKE IN SEVEN AT
INITIATION EXAMINATION WEEK

The first initiation of the year of
Archons, junior law society, was held
during the examination period, Feb.
6, followed by a banquet at Joe Park-
er's. Arvid B. Tanner acted as toast-
master, and toasts were given by Prof.
J. B. Waite of the Law school, Oscar'
P. Lambert for the old members, and
Alvin S. Buzbee for the neophytes.
The following men were taken into
membership: Alvin S. Buzbee, Rob-
ert E. Fowler, Kelsey Guilfoil, Frank
J. Riley, Harry W. Rudine, Samuel J.
Slavens, and George Struckman.
Westw-~ook, ex-'1SE, Back from Service

flichigan Leads Other Colleges;
All Publications Survive War

NEW ENROLLMENTS IN ALL COLLEGES
ECEAN H10uYERMAFORMER STUDENTS RE-REGIS"

Michigan leads.
All publications issued by the Uni-
versity of Michigan were continued on
the same schedules last semester, de-
spite the fact that there was a war
going on in Europe, the high price of
paper, a decrease in advertising, and
a small number of subscribers.
So far as it has been ascertained the
University of Michigan was the only
university in the United States -that
continued all of its publications during
the first semester this year. Many of
the newspapers, humor magazines,
and other publications at other uni-

versities had to be discontinued for
the duration of the war.
The Michigan Daily was continued,
although the paper was reduced on
many occasions from six to four pages.
The Gargoyle appeared each month,
although the price for the publication
was increased. The Michigan Tech-
nic appeared regularly, as did The In-
lander, the literary magazine. Every
number of The Michigan Alumnus also
appeared. A conclusion formulated
from these facts would seem to show
that Michigan has set the pace and
still continues to lead.

ENGINEERS MAY HAHE
TO PASS STATE EXMS
DRAFT OF BILL IS PREPARED AND
INTRODUCED BY ANN ARBOR
MEN
A bill to insure proper qualification
and competency in the practice of the
professions of both engineering and of
architecture was introduced into the
Michigan state legislature at Lansing,
on Feb. 11. The bill if it passes will
provide that every person expecting to
practice in Michigan, as either an en-
gineer or as an architect must first
pass a state examination in the same
manner that a lawyer or a doctor must
qualify for the practice of his profes-
sion. A regular state examining board
will regulate the practice of both pro-
fessions.
Ann Arbor Men Draft BT
The bill was drafted and introduced:
by a committee of three Ann Arbor
men which was appointed for the pur-
pose at a joint meeting of engineering
and architectural societies held re-
cently. The men are, Gardner S. Wil-
liams, Prof. Clarence T, Johnston, and
Prof. Emil Lorch, the two latter of the
University of Michigan.
. Architects Have Had Bill
Such a bill has been in effect for
architects in this state for four years,
but the new bill if passed will bring
both groups, engineering and archi-
tecture, under a common board for
state regulation.
RURAL ECONOMICS
COURSE IS ADDED
Principles of Rural Economics,
Course 14, will be offered the second
semester by Mr. E. D. Davis.
By way of introduction, attention is
given to the history of agriculture in
the United States for the purpose of
analyzing the economic factors in-
volved. Special attention is given to
the economic aspects of land as a fac-
tor of agricultural production.
Fundamental questions respecting
the agricultural prosperity of the na-
tion, such as farm tenency vs. land
ownership, land settlement, standardi-
zation of production, and rural cred-
its, are emphasized.
The course consists of lectures,
readings, and discussion, and will
come at 11 o'clock on Tuesday and
Thursday mornings, in room 102, Ec-

OWEN ASKED TO EXPLAI N
CONIDITIONS AT BREST
BAD WEATHER AND MUD ONLY
TROUBLE, ASSERTS BAKER;
FOOD GOOD
Washington, Feb. 17-Senator Robert
L. Owen of Oklahoma will be invited
to tell the Senate military committee
of conditions at the American embark-
ation stand at Brest which he criticiz-
ed in a statement today after his arriv-
al in New York from France.
Secretary Baker also expects Owen
to call at the war department to in-
form officials of what he saw at this
much discussed center of the Ameri-
can armies. Baker said today he was
delighted Owen had been at the
camp and after reading what the sen-
ator had to say, declared that the war
department was combing every source.
where additional shipping might be
found to bring the men home.
"Crowding at Brest? I have no
means of knowing what the answer to
that is. I have been told that the
French railroad congestion is such
that it is necessary for us to use the
railroads when we can get-them," said
Secretary Baker.
"Unsanitary? I do not think he
means unclean. There are simply
oceans of mud there. I know that be-
cause I was at Brest substantially at
this time last year. It rained there
330 days out of the 365 and sometimes
five times a day. The mud seems to
be our big trouble there."
The secretary added that returning'
officers and, others passing through
Brest have told him that food condi-
tions were very good and that outside
of the weather and the mud, they saw
little to complain of. He said they
could well imagine the feeling of the
men for returning ships, and fully
sympathized with all the discontent of
waiting under unpleasant conditions.
Detroit Alumnae
To Plan lienefit
Plans for the 1919 benefit perform-
ance for the benefit of Michigan's
Alumnae House will be launched at
the annual mid-winter luncheon of the
Detroit association of University of
Michigan women, which will be held
FnRpb 522at tha H tel Cn-dillacr. ThP

Get Senior Pictures in Year Book
Seniors who have re-entered
the University this semester may
have their pictures in the Mich-
iganensian if they are taken be-
fore Saturday. The official
photographers are: Randall,
Rentschler, White,' and Swain.
Corrtections to organization
copy will be accepted at the
Michiganensian up to Wednes-
day night. Only, organizations'
which have not arranged for
space may do so today and to-
morrow. This is the final notice.
MANAGING EDITOR.
Germans Accept
Armistice Terms
Paris, Feb. 17. - Marshal Foch this
afternoon informed the Supreme coun-
cil of the acceptance by the Germans
of the conditions of renewal for the
armistice.
Treves, Feb. 17. - Under the new
terms for the renewal of the armistice
as presented by Marshal Foch, Ge-
many must abandon all offensive im-
provements against the Poles and also
must prohibit her troops from cross-
ing the Russian frontier at a certain
line.
It was provided by the allied terms,
that the armistice must be renewed
with a fixed delay of three days for the
denuuidation -tit.'- The old terms are
to be carried out in full by Germany.
EASTERN ALUMNAE
MEET AT LUNCHEON
Miss Grace Greenwood, social di-
rector of Martha Cook building, spoke
to the University of Michigan Wom-
en's club on "What Women Are Do-
ing at Michigan," Saturday noon, Feb.
15, at an annual luncheon which was
held at the Hotel Astor in New York
city.
About 50 alumnae who were truly
representative Michigan women listen-
ed to Miss Greenwood tell of the new
and important things women were do-
ing on the campus this year. Among
the undertakings which were explain-
ed to them were the war work, schol-
arships for foreign women, the 100
per cent membership of the Women's
league, junior advisory system, Y. W.
C. A., league and residence halls, (with
the prospect of Betsy Barber dormi-
tory which may be started June 1),
vocational and public health courses,
dramatics, and self-government of the
University women. Most of these or-
ganizations were new to the alumnae
and impressed them with the progress
that the University women are mak-
ing.
The University of Michigan Women's
club is one of many alumnae organi-
zations and does a great deal for the
University iI New York. They made
the last payment on Alumnae house
here in Ann Arbor, established the Dr.
Eliza M. Mozier scholarship for girls,
and they have entertained many re-
turning Michigan men who have land-
edor have been stationed in New York
city.
ADELPHI MEMBERS TO HEAR
VARIED PROGRAM AT BANQUET
The big event of the year for Adel-
phi House of Representatives will

take place tonight when they assemble
for their annual banquet at the All-
enel hotel. Several speakers have
been obtained for the affair, which
promises to be the greatest banquet in
Adelphi's history.
Tom Black, of Detroit, will speak
for the old alumni of Adelphi. The
other speakers will beProf.hI. Leo
Sharfman, Mr. Ray K. Immel, of the
oratorical department, Ralph M. Car-
son, '17, and Kelsey Guilfoil, '20L.
Herman A. August, speaker of the
house, will act as toastmaster.

Authorities Predict Record Total ium-
ber for Next Year and Summer
School
New enrollments and registrations
at the beginning of the second semes-
ter of this year in all colleges of the
University are larger in number than
any ever recorded in the history of the
University, according to the informa-
tion that comes from each college.
The numbers include former stu-
dents and those who are entering the
University for the first time.
Many Returned Students
A new registration of over 600 was
reported yesterday in the literary col-
lege alone. In the engineering college
275 new and returned students had
been registered. The law college re-
ports an added enrollment of 91 stu-
dents, 30 omre than were enrolled In
that college last semester.
Even More Expected
The above registration numbers are
expected by those in charge, to be con
siderably increased during the next
few days. It is believed that former
students who have been discharged
from service within the past several
weeks together with those to be dis-
charged in the near future, will return
to the Univerity during the second se-
mester.
Modified Terms Admit Some
Of those returned and just register-
ed the majority are juniors and se,
niors, these men having left college in
order to enter some branch of the
service. Among the new enrollment in
the several colleges are a few who en-
ter on the condition recently adopted
by the University, the modification
pertaining to high school students who
entered the service and who already
had 11 units accredited to them.
Next Year Even Bigger
With the beginning of school next
fall all past attendances are expected
to be surpassed. The University au-
thorities look forward to this increas-
ed enrollment and predict the summer
school and the next academic year to
have attendances larger than any ever
before recorded.
Grades to Be Sent Out Soon
Class grades in the literary college
will be mailed out to the students
either Wednesday or Thursday of this
week, Registrar Arthur G. Hall said
yesterday.
The failure of some professors to
hand in all the students' grades up to
the present prevents the ascertaining
of the all-A students. Within the next
few days this list is expected to be
ready for publication.
LEGISLATORS HERE
TO OBTAIN DATA
A sub-committee of the ways and
means committee of the house of rep-
resentatives from the state legislature
visited the University yesterday. Their
visit here is for the purpose of ascer-
taining the facts as to the needs of
the University in regard to the spe7
cial appropriations asked of the legis-
lature now in session.
Mr. Henry Croll, Jr., and Mr. George
W. Welsh made up this sub-committee,
which is on its bi-yearly inspection
of all the educational institutions
throughout the state. The senate and
house committees which were here
several weeks ago. recommended spe-
cial appropriations for the University,
and the sub-committee is now deter-
miling these recommendations.
Try-outs for The Michiganensan

Any sophomore desiring to try
out for the business staff of The
Michiganensian should report at
2 o clock this afternoon in room
1, Press building.

MODIFIED ENTRANCE TERI
MIT SOME DISCHARGED F
SERVICE
LIT COLLEGE GRADI
TO BE SENT OUT S

onomics building. It is open to allbĀ°'dr ectasLarngdcfthe
students who have had courses 1, la board of directors has arranged for the
or le. chartering of .one of the moving pic-
ture theaters in the city, the Majestic,
TYPEWRITER CASE CONTAINS for the first week in March. Fred Law-
LIQUOR MEANT FOR STUDENTS ton, '11, will aid in the revival of col-
. lege spirit at the performances. Sev-
The proprietor of a local restaurant eral box parties by prominent alumni
will be arrested this morning on the have been planned for the various
charge of bringing liquor into the evenings.
state which it is said he is supplying Mrs. Rae B. Gripman, president of
to students, according to Chief of Po- the association, will preside at the
lice O'Brien. luncheon at which Miss Mary Farns-
State food and drug authorities sus- worth will speak. Mrs. George King
pected the contents of a typewriter and Miss Vera Burridge of Detroit are
case which was sent to the local man in charge of the sale of luncheon tick-
and ordered the police to investigate. ets. Tickets are $1 each.
The typewriter case was found to con- Ann Arbor alumnae and undergrad-
tain three gallons of whiskey in bot- uate women will be cordially wel-
tles labeled olive oil. comed.

Limited Number of

Std ts

Directory

Men who are desirous of work-
ing on the editorial aside of the
Michigan Daily should call at
The Daily office after 2 o'clock
this afternoon and ask for H. C.
L. Jackson.V#

H. G. estb rook, ex-'18E, returned
to the University Monday, after 14
months' service inthe army. West-
brook was commissiened a second
lieutenant in the field artillery serv-
ice sevral months ago upon complet-
ing the officers training school course
-:at Camp Custer.

are still to be had at the
Michigan Daily Office

Price

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