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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 02, 1919 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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SILESIA

(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 31.-An official commun-
ication issued, this evening says:
"The Allied ministers have decided to
send to Teschen (Austrian Silesia),
Allied delegates, with the purpose of
assuring the peaceful exploitation of

with the Czechs and Poles, pending
territorial settlements by the peace
conference.
British Criticize Delay in Mails
London, Feb. 1-Failure to dispatch
mail on fast steamers operated by the
British government between English
ports and New York between Jan. 7
and Jan. 20 has been critized by news-

Governor Proclaims Jiemorial
Services For JPhicigan Dead

Al'-' IN UAII

Instrum ents

the industrial district, in agreement, papers here.

ROLLER SKATING,

Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturday
Nights from 7 to 10.
Saturday and- Sunday Afternoons
from 2 to 5.

Many of the brave boys who so
freely offered their lives in our cause
will not come back to us. Some of
them sleep in sunny France. Some lie
"in Flanders' Fields,' among the pop-
pies. Some went down to the sea in
ships and there met a cruel fate. Some
were cut off by accident and disease
in our own land. They all died that
freedom might still live; and, while
our heads are bowed with sorrow,
our hearts are filled with pride and
thankfulness when we think of their
willing spirit of service. We shall
not forget their splendid achieve-
ments.
m is fitting, however, that we should
in some special way manifest our ap-
preciation of their noble devotion and
sacrifice.
Therefore, in order that we may
pay a tribute of respect and affection
to the memory of the gallant lads who
died for us, I, Albert E. Sleeper, gov-
ernor of the state of Michigan, do is-

sue this my proclamation and hereby
designate and set aside Sunday, the
second day of February, 1919, as Mem-
orial Sunday forMichigan's martyred
sons in the Great War.
And I earnestly request the people
of the state to gather on that' day in
their accustomed places of worship
and there hold appropriate and solemn
services in memory of our honored
dead. Let every church in Michigan
devote one service, preferably the
morning service, to this purpose.
I suggest too that, in communities
where this plan is practicable, the lay-
men arrange for a general service,
with a suitable program of music and
addresses,tto be held in the afternoon.
I further request that during the
day flags be displayed at half-staff, and
that every one wear a small bow of
white ribbon in. loving remembrance
of those who will not return to us.
Signed,
ALBERT E. SLEEPER,
Governor.

-:for:-

t

Exclusive Agency for
Gibson

Club Work

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Mandolins and Guitars

I,

Coli4seum

I_

725 So. 5th Ave.

Phone 996

1

Shool0 of Danclng
Evening classes for adults. Limit six persons
to a class. Individual attention
given to each pupil

Vega
Banjo Mandolins
Tenor Banjos--and
Guitar Banjos

I

UNIER ITYRQUIRES
LESS FROM VETRAN
MAY BE ADMjTTED WITH FEWER
CREDITS; NU§T MAKE UP
WORK ATER

Enroll now for class commencing
Feb. 11
Private lessons by appointment

Classes in toe, classical and National dancing

MISS JE ANETTE H. KRUSZKA

Studio:
516NWilliam St.
Phone 1422-R

Residence
2006 Washtenaw
Phone 1598

11

Letters informing high school stu-
dents of the modifications recently
made in the requirements for admis-
sion to the University, are to be sent
next week to the principals of, all the
accredited high schools in the state.
The communication reads in part:
"While the University has in no way
lowered its regular entrance require-
ments on account of war conditions,
an arrangement has just been made
for the admission of young men who
left high school te enter military ser-
vice, and now, because of maturity
gained in service, may be allowed the
opportunity to attempt college work.
The following rule is a mere modifica-
tion of one, already existing, and ap-
plies to the College of Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts, and the Colleges
of Engineering and Architecture, and
the School of Pharmacy.
Eleven Units Required
"Persons whose preparatory cours-
es have been interrupted by reason
of military service or other approv-
ed war work, may, during 1919, be ad-
mitted on trial upon the presentation
of 11 units, at least nine of which
shall be from Group I (English, for-
eign languages, history, mathematics,
and science), gained either upon ex-
amination or upon official certification
and recommendation by the principal
of an accredited high school. Such
students must completely satisfy the
requirements for admission as regular
students within two years after ma-
triculation."

AMERICAN EXPRESS COMPANY
MOVES FOR BETTER SERVICE
1(By Associated Press)
New York, Feb. 1.-A nation-wide
campaign to improve the nation's ex-
press service will be inaugurated on
Feb. 10 by the American Railway I;-
press company through the 135,000
men and women enpoyed in the ex-
press business, it was announced here
tonight. The purpose is to interest
the shippers and the people generally
in this government organization's plan
to raise the standards of packing,
wrapping and marking express ship-
ments with a view to minimizing the
waste of time, effort and money that
result from package's being lost or
damaged through lax methods of pre-
paring them for sending forward.
To Take Up Aircraft Regulation
Paris, Feb. 1.-The air conference
which will meet in Paris in early Feb-
ruary will comprise flve delegates
each from France, 14ngland, Belgium,
Italy and the United States.
Students read The Daily.-Adv.

Un h'erstty' mIusic 'ibouse

Hawaiian
Ukuleles and
Banjo-Ukuleles

'I

Mrs.a M.~ ~ A loor ~t

I

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I-nnsne ~i

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How Do You Feel?.

-1

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MARTIN

HALLER

112 E, Liberty Street

11

How does it
house again?

feel to get back into the old fraternity

Does everything seem quite like it did before?
Don't you find it uncomfortable to sit and look
those battered up walls?

11

at

I

We

Are

New Effects In Good Furniture

Home-Dodors

It is our business to put your home in tip-top con-
dition.
Call us for a consultation.
We will look things over and prescribe a, remedy
for all ailments.

Retain Old Rules
The requirements for regular ad-
mission to the college of the Univer-
sity are the completion of a full four-
year course in a standard high, school,
amounting to at least 15 units, at
least 12 of which must be from Group
I, while the remaining three may be
chosen from any subjects counted by
the high school towards graduation.
Only those are admitted without ex-
amination who are officially recom-
mended graduates of accredited high
schools. Others may secure admis-
sion by passing examinations in the 15
units from Group I.
This modification will take effect
beginning with the second semester,
which starts Feb. 17.

You will find in our line of Period designs,
the work of master designers and built by the
foremost manufacturers of truly good furniture

I

11

GoodValues in

I

Desks

Oswald A. Herz
Decorator

112 W. Washington

Phone 353-FI

---

e..-.

200,000 Yanks To Wed French Girls.
Paris, Feb. 1.-At least 200,000 Am-
ericans now in the army will remain
in France, according to a statement
made by a priminent member of the
American colony in Paris and quoted
by the Intransigeant today. The ma-
jority will remain, it is said, because
they wish to marry French women,
and the rest because they are charmed
with French life and see great oppor-
tunities here for American energy.
President Wilson to Visit Brussels
Paris, Feb. 1.- President Wilson's
present plans indicate that he still
hopes to visit Brussels before sailing
for home and will make the trip at the
last possible moment previous to his
departure.
POSITION OPEN FOR MAN
Must have successful sales exper-
ience and ability to manage. We want
a student who has made good selling
something-such as books, or other
speciality. Give reference and exper-
ience. Address F. S. C., Care of Mich-
igan Daily.-Adv.
Students read The Daily.-Adv.

0i

Double Deckers

11

Rugs'

Chairs

Rockers

iiT

Davenports

1

Curtain's

WANTED
WANTED-Used Hammond Typewrit-
er, mathematical machine preferred.
Name lowest cash price. C. R. Muel-
ler, 300 Webb Ave., Detroit.
WANTED - Violinist and banjorine
player for dance work. Experience
necessary. Playing one and two
nights a week. Phone 1050-J.
WANTED-A good cook by Fratern-
ity. Must be competent. Inquire

LOST
LOST-Brown vest, on State between
Monroe and Packard, Saturday eve-
ning. Finder p.ase return to E.,
Michigan Daily.
LOST-Small leather notebook. Name
in cover. Return to owner, 1303
Wilmont. Phone 2282-R. Reward.
FOUND
FOUND-A fountain pen on Maynard
St. Owner can have same by paying
for this ad. Box G.

MARTIN HALLER

11

112 E. Liberty Street

1,

E!

6

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