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February 02, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-02

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY; PROBABLY
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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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VOL. XXIX. No. 92. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1919. PRICE THREE CN'J

HEDSWITH GASAND
HIGH EXPLOSIVES
PUSHALLIS0BCK
SITUATION IN ARCHANGEL SAID
SERIOUS BY MILITARY
OFFICES
GERMAN GAS AND SHELLS
USED BY BOLOS, REPORT

, Y" PLANS HEALTH-
CAMPAIGN IN ARMY
A health campaign among Ameri-
can soldiers abroad is soon to be
started by the war council of the
Y. M. C. A. Several thousand Amer-
ican young men have recently en-
tered universities in France, Eng-
land, -and Belgium and the work will
go on also among them.
Eight health exhibits are now be-
ing prepared in Chicago. Each one
will be accompanied by a corps of
lecturers who will give health talks
to the men. Most of the lecturers
are to be army surgeons designated
by the surgeon general.
The exhibits are being prepared
under the guidance and in co-opera-
tion with several health societies in
Chicago and New York.
RULES FOR, SEMESTER
FINALSOUTTO LITS

Drastic Action Against Runs
Marshal Foch If Proved They
Supplied Materials

by

(By Associated Press)
Archangel, Feb. 1. - An official
statement on the operations issued
today says:
"Wednesday and Thursday the Bol-
sheviki attacked the positions at
Taresevo;, compelling the Allies to
retire northwards, and they are now
holding position 20 miles north of
Tarsevo. It is reported that the
Bolsheviki are using gas shells. The
Allies are completely equipped with
anti-gas apparatus.
More Volunteers Enlist
"In Mumansk, Allied patrols con-
sisting of Karelian volunteers have
reached Ondozero (Notosero?). From
this village the Karelian have been
enabled to enlist more volunteers."
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 1.The situation
in the Archangel district is reported
by military offices in northern Rus-
sia, as extremely critical.
Advices to the war department
made no reference to- an appeal for
re-enforcements, but it was said here
that in as much as this was a matter
for determination by the supreme
war council at Paris, a more com-
plete report had been sent to that
body, probably with arequest for ad-
ditIonal reports. Reports that the
Bolsheviki forces were using gas
shells were taken to mean that this
equipment had been supplied through
German sources, notwithtsanding
the terms of the armistice, and if
this is established as a fact, drastic
action against the Germans would be
taken by Marshal Foch, it is said.
Few Troops Retreating
Available figures by war depart-
metn officials show that the British
forces in the north is approximate-
ly 6,000, American 4,500, French
1,500, Loyal Russians under British
officers 1,200 and 1,000 other soldiers
of one of the smaller Allied coun-
tries. The exact disposition of these
forces is not known officially in
Washington, no report having been
made on this in some weeks. Army
officers said that the body of troops
now retreating before well armed
forces was small, being little more
than an advanced post.
Experts Say Gas Use Serious
Reports of a 40 mile retreat led
experts to believe that a larger body
was engaged than had been suppos-
ed heretofore.
Use of gas and high explosives by

INSTRUCTORS SHOWN
OF FORMER S. A.
STUDENTS

STATUS
T. C.

Circulars are being distributed by
the Registrar's office among the in-
structors in the literary college call-
ing their attention to certain points
concerning the examinations and
grades.
A final examination must be held
in every class, and at the time set in
the schedule, states the circular. Each
student must take the examination
in every course he elects. 't'he grades
are final and no grade can be raised
by a subsequent test.
The special rule adopted by the lit-
erary faculty in December, is as fol-
lows: In reporting members of the
S. A. T. C. and the naval unit at the
end of the first semester, 1918-19, any
instructor may, at his discretion, use
the mark D (dropped) instead of the.
usual mark E, where, Inspite of gen-
uine endeavor, the student fals to
earn any credit.
In case a student, whose work has
been of grade C, is absent from ex-
amination, he may, on presentation of
a satisfactory excuse, be permitted to
take the examination in the Regis-
trar's office during the fourth week of
the next semester, having made ap-
plication to the Registrar during the
first two weeks.
Reports of the grades will not be
given out by the instructors, but are
sent out by the Registrar as soon as
all the grades are handed in to him.
BAKER WANTS ALL
CANTONMENTS KEPT
Washington, Feb. 1. -Secretary
Baker and Assistant Secretary Cro-
well have been urging the abandon-
ment of 14 of the 16 National Guard
camps, and purchase by the govern-
ment of the sites of all the national
army cantonments here today.
It is understood that Camp Kear-
ney, California, and Camp Sevier,
South Carolina, would be the two
guard camps acquired-by the govern-
ment, with others returning to the
land owners at the expiration of the
present leases.
Mr. Baker explained that the pur-
chase of this land was a purely
business proposition, and that re-
gardless of the size of the future
army it would be the policy of the
war department to train men in
large units instead of small ones as
in the past.
TODAY IS THE DAY
Despite the fact that the armis-
tice has been signed, the ground hog
persists in foretelling the weather
for the coming six weeks. War may-
affect the weather to a certain ex-
tent, according to the scientific ex-
perts of the day, but the ground hog
is the deciding factor tradition says.
If you don't believe us-wait and find
out.
SATURDAY'S GAMES
(Special to The Daily)
Northwestern 23; Purdue 22.
Minnesota 28; Iowa 18.
Chicago 24; Wisconsin 19.
Six small fires occurred in Ann Ar-
bor yesterday. No damage to any ex-
tent was done to any of the threatened
homes.

OFFICIAL1ASUATY
LISTS ANOUNCE
Tabulation of Losses Gives 10,000
Cases Still Unaccounted For;
Report Dates to Jan. 10
GENERAL MARCH'S REPORTS
MICHIGAN DIISION LOST 1694
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 1. - Official ta-
bles of the latest battle casualties of
the American forces in France made
public by General March, chief of
staff, shows that 10,000 remain whol-
ly unaccounted for, nearly three.
months after the ending of hostili-
ties. The deaths, missing, and pris-
oners, are tabulated until Jan. 10 for
each of the 30 combat- divisions of
General Pershing's forces. Seventy
thousand, four hundred thirty-four
are classified as missing or captur-
ed. Only 29 military prisonersare be
lieved to be still in Germany on Jan.
8, and 4,80 had been checked up as
returned, and 118 died in captivity.
Some portion of the great party of
missing men may be located, as the
return of the army thins- out the
American force in France.
Majority Killed in Action
Indications are that the majority
of the 10,000 .wil finally be added to
the roll of honor shown in the table
of those killed or died of wounds now
recorded as 39,158 men.
To that figure also must be added
1,511 men of the Marine brigade, fig-
ures on which, not covered in the ta-
ble, were obtained from official sourc-
es This brings the grand aggregate
in battle up to 40,709, and returns
estimated officially, 95 per cent com-
plete. Figures on missing and wound-
ed .of the marines are lacking and
cannot be accurately estimated. The
army tables give a total' of '14,649
mising in action and 2,785 known
prisoners, making up the 17,434
missing or captured.
Michigan Division Loses 1,694
The 32nd division, composed large-
ly of Michigan men, lost 1,694 men
killed in action, 708 died of wounds
or other causes, 768 missing, and 43
were taken prisoners. The 42 divi-
sion (Rainbow), including troops
from all states lost 1,702 men killed
in action, 723 died of wounds and
other causes, 440 missing and 85
prisoners.
C rippled Kiddies
Lnjoy Tree Showi
It doesn't take money to be happy.
Health isn't even a requisite. Sounds
like a lie but it was proven yester
day, when 16 of the happiest kids in
the world walked, some of them did,
from Palmer ward to see the free
movies at the Methodist church
Not a one of of them had a cent,I
and four of the number were wheel-3
ed in invalid chairs. One little fel-
low who has been suffering with
rheumatism since infancy was a mem-
ber of the party, he enjoyed the showI
more than any of the others for it
was his first movie.
MICHIGAN PROFESSOR HONOR-
ED BY DENTAL, CONVENTION
R. W. Bunting, D. D. S., secretary
of the College of Dental Surgery, was
elected president of the American
Institute of Dental Teachers, at their
convention which was held last week[

at Atlanta, Ga. Dr. Bunting's posi-
tion is one of high honor, for the or-
ganization is composed of professors
from all the dental colleges of the
country, who meet once a year for
the discussion of topics of technical
importance in the dental schools, and
to exchange ideas for the benefit of
the teachers of the dental profession.
Next year's convention will be held
in Detroit.

MYSTERY SHROUDS
DEATH OF-CHINESE
Officials of Educational Mission Mur-
dered at Washington; No Motives
Discovered
MICHIGAN STUDENT SMEON-
ED AT FATHER'S DECEASE
No motive has been found for the
mysterious murder Wednesday in
Washington of Dr. Theodore Wong
and his two' assistants, C. H. Hsie
and Ben Sen. Dr. Wong was director
of the Chinese educational mission
to the United States and the father
of Helen Wong, '20, a student in the
literary college.
In the belief of the police, the three
men were killed some time Wednes-
day, although the murder was not
discovered until late Friday, when
Kong LI, a fellow student of Hsie
and Wu, called at the headquarters
of the mission. All three men were
shot through the head.
Pollee at a Loss
So far, the only clue the police have
been able to discover is the descrip-
tion of the Chinese who met L at
the door when he went to headquar-
ters to see Dr. Wong last Wednes-
day. Persons living in the neigh-
borhood testify to hearing shots sev-
eral days ago,'but accounts differ as
to the tilde.
No motive for the crime has been
found by officials at the Chinese le-
gation. Robbery was not the pur-
pose of the slayers, nor were valua-
ble government papers towhed.
Daughter Called to Capital
Friday evening President Hutchins
received !a telegram from Washing-p
ton stating that Dr. Wong was in a
"critical condition" and requesting
that Miss Wong be notified. Dean
Myra B. Jordan, at the president's re-
quest, communicated with Miss Wong
and accompanied her to the station
yesterday morning.
Miss Tsing L. LI, '21, president of
the Chinese Students' club, said last
night that the cause of the murder
could not have been robbery, nor
could she suggest any political rea-
son for the murder of her fellow
countrymen.
Miss Wong, who is registered from
Shanghai, first entered the Univer-
sity last summer, although for two
years previous to her entrance here
she resided in Washington with her
father.
S. A.T.C. Share
Blonus -- Djurkee
Major Ralph Durkee, recently re-
turned from Chicago, in talking of
the proviso in the new war revenue
bill giving a $50 bonus to all enlist-
ed army and navy men, and a simi-
lar payment of $200 to all officers in
the army, navy, and , marine corps
upon their discharge from service,
said:
"Any bill that is passed by con-
gress providing for a bonus of $50
to all enlisted men, honorably dis-
charged, would apply to all the S. A
T. C. and naval unit men who were
stationed at the University. Men who
were sent from AnnArbor to officers'
training camps and received their
commissions will be given the regu-
lar officers' allotment, while those
not obtaining their commissions will

be classed as released privates."
The members of the engineering
reserve corps, although only in serv-
ice about three weeks, will also be
included in the benefits of the bill.
In case such a bill is passed by
congress 3,500 former S. A. T. C. and
naval unit men of the University of
Michigan, it is estimated, will re-
ceive approximately $175,000..

SCENES OF HAVOC
IMPRESS WI LSO N
Paris, Feb. 1.-"No one can put in-
to words the impressions I have re-
ceived among such scenes of desola-
tion and ruin," was the only state-
mt made by President Wilson up-
on his return froi= a short trip to
Rheims. ,
Mr. Wilson, accompanied by Mrs.
Wilson, Admiral Grayson and a very
small party left Paris a few days
ago to view the scenes of havoc and
devastation wrought by the Germans
at Chateau-Thierry and Rheims. This
trip is one which the Entente na-
tions have been wanting the President
to take for some time, as it is
thought he will be better prepared
to discuss terms of settlement in the
Peace Conference after viewing the
actual horrors of destruction brought
about by the Hun invaders.
J - HOP PREPARTIONS
NOW WELL UNDER WAY
COMMITTEES BUSY ON DETAILS;
COMBATTING WAR TIMES
PRICES
During the past week progress has
been made by the J-Hop committee.
Each of the sub-committees has start-
ed its its work, decorations, music,
programs, favors and novelties all
having received attention. Salesmen
and bidders on everything .concern-
ed with the Hop have been asked for
"something new, better, and differ-
ent," and they have been produc-
ing it.
A definite expense budget has been
formulated, allowing each commit-
tee sufficient money for its needs. The
question of expenses this year is
more difficurt to handle than ever be-
fore.' War prices are asked for ev-
erything, making the necessary ex-
penditures unusually heavy-How-
ever, it is expected that the total cost
will be kept within reason, without
in any way detracting from the Hop.
Fraternities are already making
plans for Hop week, and the commit-
tee will- soon be able to co-operate
with them, according to Karl H. Velde,
'20, chairman.
ANN ARBOR BISH OP
GIVEN STATE HONOR
Rt. Rev. E. D. Kelly has been ap-
pointed bishop of Grand Rapids by
Pope Benedict XV. News of the ap-
pointment arrived from Rome on Sat-
urday.
Bishop Kelly, who is in California
recovering from a nervous break-
down, has been administrator of the
Detroit diocese under Bishop Foley
during the past seven and one-half
years. His vigorous support of the
local church has endeared him to the
hearts of his Ann Arbor friends, and
this new position is only a formal
recognition of splendid service.
As it was thought that a call might
come to some more distant church
see, his friends welcomed this state
appointment. He will probably re-
turn to the new field soon, for re-
cently word was received in a letter
from him that his recovery was prac-
tically complete.
U. S. LINER PIAZC
WRECKED; NONE DIE

(By Associated Press)
Deal, England, Feb. 1.-All aboard
the American steamer Piaze wrecked
off here, have been accounted for,
according to a report given out to-
night. There is no loss of life.
(Deal is a seaport on the North
Sea, eight miles north of Dover. The
population of the town is 11,000.)
STUDENT DIRECTORY STILL
ON SALE; FEW COPIES LEFT
Out of the 2,000 directories which
were put on sale last Thursday, only
about 100 remain on sale at The
Daily office. At the rate these few
are going, anyone wishing one should
come to the Press building and get it
at once. The directory in addition
to containing the complete student
and faculty enrollment, has a list of
the students and faculty in the State
Normal school at Ypsilanti.

MiCHIGN LOSES
TO ILLINI TEAM;
SCORE_-27 TO 23
GAME WON BY SUCKERS DURING
FIRST PERIOD BY GOOD
SHOOTING
WILLIAMS STARS
FOR WOLVERINES
Unusual Comeback Staged By Mitch-
el's Men in Second Half Which
Started To Late
Failing to start their comeback
quickly enough after allowing the Ill-
ini quintet to get a big lead in the
first half, Michigan was defeated by
Illinois by a score 27 to 23, last night
in Waterman gymnasium before the
largest crowd assembled this season.
Having made only one basket and
three free throws in the first period,
Michigan did not find themselves until
the middle of the last half. From this
time on they were dropping them in
constantly, making a mammoth ef-
fort in the last few minutes of play
to overcome the big lead of the Suck-
ers.
Karpus Makes First Point
The scoring was started by Karpus
who shot a free throw. This was fol-
lowed by a basket by Williams a short
time later. This advantage was but
short lived as the Urbana team began
to toss them in from all points of the
court. Starting with a rush and mak-
ing five baskets in quick succession,
the visitors acquired a lead which was
never passed.
The game wa one big fight from
start to finish, Williams participating
in the most. The big guard was all
over the floor, and his good work sav-
ed Michigan from being overwhelmed
in the first period. The pace began to
tell on him though and in the sec-
ond period he slowed up considerably.
Wolverines Start Comeback
The substitution of R-ychener for
Cohn marked the beginning oftMich-
igan's uphill climb. Tossing one
through the middle of the hoop short-
ly after taking the floor, he seemed
to inspire Karpus who started to
throw them in from everywhere. In
the first period the little forward had
no luck at all.
It was the Wolverines' inability to
find the basket in the first half that
lost them the game.aOnly one double
counter was made and that by Wil-
liams. Shot after shot hit around the
basket, Michigan trying as often as
did Illinois, but always failing to reg-
ister.
Illinois Teamwork Smooth
Some pretty bits of teamwork and
basket throwing was exhibited by the
Suckers. Their forwards seemed to
be able to step out of the arms of the
men that were on them and toss the
ball with one hand toward the back-
board, often scoring Taylor and Wil-
son also threw in numerous long one.
The stars of the evening were Wil-
liams for Michigan and Wilson for
Coach Jones' team. The former was
everywhere, and although doing lit-
tle of the spectacular managed to
worry all and any that happened to
have the ball. The latter was the
Sucers' up court player, and although
not sharing in so many fights manag-
ed to cage four baskets and was the
visitors' main man in their follow-up
game. Twice he guarded a Michigan

man on a ball outside, and both times
managed to connect with the ball,
knocking it to the ground and throw-
ing in a basket. Both of these came
in the second half and were the points
that lost the battle.
Michigan*Vineup Changed
Coach Mitchell shook up his lineup,
sending Wilson and Weiss in in the
places of Rychener and Hewlett. The
latter replaced Weiss in the middle of
the first half but the stocky guard
played out the game. Although "Tug"
Wilson was the most brilliant*man of
the Illini's team, he would have been
much more so if it had not been for
the constant guarding which the Mich-
igan Wilson, "Whitey," kept over him.
The game was interesting to watch.
The beautiful team play and basket
throwing of Illinois in the first half
was more or less of a novelty to Wol-
verine fans, and Michigan's heroic
comeback in the final period allowed
the crowd to come away from the
(Continued on Page Three)

the bolsheviki
army men as
feature of the
they affected
from which . it
Americans had
tire, is a small

was looked upon by
the most disquieting
military reports, as
America. Taresevo,
was reported the
been forced to re-
town about 130miles

directly south of Archangel. It does
not appear on war department maps.
SIX BILLION WAR
BILL THIS YEAR
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb, 1.-A war rev-'
enue revised to raise about six bil-
lion dollars by taxation this year
and four billion annually thereafter,
assumed final form when the senate
and house committees reached a
complete agreement upon the meas-
ure. It will go to the house Wednes-
day.
Competition Begins for Opera Poster
Thirteen student artists attended
the meeting of the Union opera pos-
ter committee held yesterday morn-
ing at the Union. All signified their
intention to submit drawings in the
competition. The posters are to be
handed in to the committee not later

First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
!ifemortat 4unba~g
10:30 A. M.
Students Cordially Invited

r

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