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January 31, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-31

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THE WEATHER
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VOL. XXIX. No. 90. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

TWELVE LINERS
CARRING MANY
SAIL FR U S
SHIPS WITH OFFICERS AND MEN
LEAVE FRANCE FOR
HOME
MICHIGAN HAS
TWO COMPANIES
Four Coast Artillery Regiments Said
to Have Every Man on Active
Duty Present
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 30. - Departure
from France of 12 transports, carry-
ing 850 officers and 11,000 men, in-
cluding four coast artillery regi-
ments complete, was announced to-
day by the war department.
Several of the ships will dock at
New York. Three will dock at New-
port News and one each at Baltimore,
and 1 hiladelphia.
The transports now en route in-
clude some of the largest in service
among them the Atamennon, Rijban,
Cedric and Esteaii, carrying two spe-
cial Michigan companies.
The returning coast artillery regi-
ments are 4th, 24th, 51st and 60th.
Announcement that the regiments
were returning complete was made at
the war department to mean that
each regiment was coming back at
full war strength-that every man
at present on 'active duty with the
unit was returning.
PRINCETON REFUSES
TO STOOP TO THIS
Princeton is up in arms over the
action of a committee which chal-
lenged Vassar to a debating contest.
Voicing the apparent attitude of the
bulk of the student body the Daily
Princetonian casts scathing remarks
at this radical departure in intercol-
legiate debating.
"We have been so kindly to the
debating teams," it says, "as to rank
them one step above the chess teams,
but the proposal to cross words with
the petticoated representatives of
this bittr rival is too much. We
throw up our hands in silent surren-
der; our vocabulary of investives is
utterly inadequate.
"'Why -not debate Vassar?' ask the
sages of Whig and Clio. Yes, why
not? Why not a kintting or sewing
tilt with Bryn Mawr? Why not a
pingpong match with Barnard, or a
spelling bee with Wellesley, or a tea-
pouring contest with Miss So-and-So's
finishigig school? 0, even better, why
not take on the International Corre-
spondence School for a heated skirm-
ish in penmanship ?"
COFFtE PRICES INCREASE AS
LIQUOR DECREASES--HAMILL
As fast as liquor is abolished, cof-
fee roasters will raise their prices,
according to C. C. Hanill, local man-
ager of the Atlantic and Pacific Tea
company. Roasters have already
raised their prices 10 to 15 cents on
the popular brands.
The government has taken charge
of the ships formerly engaged in the
coffee trade, consequentlyhno coffee
cargoes have arrived in the United
States since October 1918.

Sales in the local coffee market
have increased nearly 100 per cent
during the past six months, accord-
tug to Mr. Hamill. He advises every-
one to put in their next summer's
supply of coffee now.
Oklahoma to Have New R. 0. T. C.
Oklahoma, Jan. 30.-Two sections
of the R. O. T. C. are to be establish-
ed at the Oklahoma Agricultural col-
lege next semester. One is for se-
niors and the other for juniors.

CALL SOON OUT FOR
OPERA CANDIDATES
Tryouts for the 1919 Union opera
cast will probably be called within
the next 10 days or two weeks. No
specific time can be set, as it is not
definitely known when the author of
the play, Donal H. Haines, '09, will
arrive. Illness prevented Mr. Haines
coming last week. He was expected
this week but no word has been re-
ceived lately from him. When the di-
rector, E. M. Schuter, comes, he will
meet all the tryouts and assist the
opera officials in choosing men to
play the leading parts.
Mr..'Schuter has consented to en-
gage a dancing teacher wjiom he will
bring with him. If he succeeds in
signing up the instructor desired, all
concerned with the opera feel confi-
dent that the dancing of 1 both princi-
pals and chorus will be a decided suc-
cess.
Now She Hovers
Near The Phone
Now that hopeless youth can call
"her" up and ask her for the as-
signment in history. Now Genevieve
can look up the address of her
"Dear Professor" and decide whether
she likes his taste in architecture.
And the cause -of it all is a little
yellow book.
Yes, you've guessed IN But then
how could you help it when every-
where you went yesterday you were
greeted with, "Buy your directories
here!" No attempt to defend the col-
or will be made, though the color is
no indication of its character.
If you criminally neglected buying
one yesterday it were best that you
get out your trusty Colt, shine it up,
and then wade through the strug-
gling crowd which you will be sure
to meet up at the Daily offices in the
Press building on Maynard street.
When you have succeeded in reach-
ing the door wink your left eye. You
will be sure to get one then. We
haveno method of procedure to offer
for those who can only wink their
right eye.' -
Remember the sale of directories
is an annual event just like Christ-
mas or house-cleaning. And as 1,000
of the 1,500 copies printed of this
year's directory have already been
sold, get one before they are gone.
NEW ARGUMENTS ANNOUNCED
FOR DEFEAT OF PROHIBITION
Lansing, Jan. 30.-New. arguments
by old antagonists of the "Wine and
Beer" measure have lately made their
appearance. The opposition now
comes from the property owners in
the city and country districts.
They claim that under the pro-
posed measure the city and county
treasuries will receive no fees from
the saloon licenses, all of the money
going to the state, while the city and
county jails must house the returning
Inebriates, who will insist on getting
drunk on two and one-half per cent
beer.
"For us," said a leading Detroiter,
"it would be all outgo and no in-
come. As compared with the propos-
ed measure, even the old order of
things had their virtues."
SOPHOMORE PROM COMITTEE
TO DECIDE ON DANCE DATE
Plans for the sophomore prom will
be discussed at the meeting of the

prom committee at 7 o'clock tonight
in the new Union building. If all mem-
bers of the committee are present it
is expected that definite arrange-
ments about the time for the dance
can be made.
Actual War Photographs Exhibited
University of Chicago is having an
exhibit of war photographs prepared
by the Signal Corps under actual
fighting.

NO BOLSHEVISM IN FREE
TAK IN UNIERSITIES
PROF. I. W. SELLARS SEES ONLY
OPEN-MINDEDNESS IN
DISCUSSIONS
"Bolshevism pertains to the social
and economic, particularly the eco-
nomic, problems of a people," said
Prof. Roy W. Sellars, of the Philoso-
phy department, yesterday. "Hence,
it can find little place in the campus
life of the average university stu-
dent, since his only economic prob-
lem is the question of receiving money
from home."
fiHe considered the story that bol-
shevism is being expounded by some
of the students in the universities to
be improbable. "Bolshevism, the doc-
trine of the bolsheviki, is purely a
Russian move," he said.
Professor Sellars thinks that the
fact that many university students
are seriously discussing world prob-
lems need not be taken to mean that
bolshevism is invading the campuses.
"The rapid growth and swift prog-
ress in intellectual thought among
students may be considered as a
sign that the college men and women
of today are alert and wide awake to
the responsibilities of life," he said.
TWO PROFESSORS
GO TO CONFERENCE
Prof. Moses Gomberg, of the chem-
istry department, and Prof. G. Ca1
Huber, of the medical department,
have been appointed by President
Harry B. Hutchins as delegates to rep-
resent the University at a conference
to be held Feb. 1, in the Ryerson lab-
oratory of the University of Chicago.
The conference is to meet under the
auspices of the National Research
council. At this meeting the most
prominent scientists from all parts
of the country will discuss what is to
be done in the way of scientific work
in the future.
AEROPLANES PLAY PART IN
DETROIT ANNUAL AUTO SHOW
Michigan's buying public will be of-
fered an opportunity to purchase
aeroplanes at the Detroit Automobile
SChow, to be held March 1 to 8.
While aeroplanes have been shown
at a number of the shows about the
country this will, be the first time
they have ever been more than mere
curiosities.
The Packard Motor Company, mak-
er of this aircraft, feels ready to
place before the public an aeroplane
which is not a novelty, not a military
plane, but a machine designed and
built for general utility. Without
doubt this exhibit will be the center
of general interest to the public.
With a large amount of space al-
ready reserved, a record auto show is
prophesied.
0
NEXT SUNDAY TO BE MEMORIAL
DAY FOR MICHIGAN'S DEAD
Next Sunday has been proclaimed
by Governor Sleeper as Memorial
Sunday for Michigan's martyred sons
in the great war.
The governor's proclamation re-
quests every church in Michigan to
hold fitting services on this day.
Flags displayed at half-mast during
the day and small bows of white
ribbon worn by everyone are desig-
nated as ways to express loving re-

membrance of those brave men who
will not return.
Fire Department Answers Two Calls
Two slight roof fires occurred yes-
terday morning but little or no dam-
age was incurred. One occurred at
the home of Mr. Charles Carrell at
718 Monroe street and the other at the
home of Mr. S. A. Bement at 604 E
Madison street.

LEAGUE RESEMBLES
ADMIRAL SAYS NEED POLICE
FORCE OF NATIONS; URGES
NAVY EXPANSION
(By Associated Press)
Washington, , Jan. 30.-Urging im-
niediate naval expansion today be-
fore the house naval committee which
votes tomorrow on the administra-
tion's new building prgram, Admiral
Mayo, commander-in-chief of the At-
lantic fleet, says:
"The league of nations is rapidly
getting down to a sewing circle, with
no means of enforcement and no in-
ternational police force. Now is the
time to go the limit in expanding the
navy."
Admiral Mayo agreed with Repre-
sent,tive Padgett, that congress
shold authorize the construction of a
number of ships, leaving the decision
as to the type, character, armor,
and speed, to be worked out by the
naval experts.
In urging naval expansion the ad-
miral said that the present was the
opportune time, and that American
expansion was expected by the world.
PROMOTION ONCE
MORE IN ARMY
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 30. - Secretary
Baker has removed the restriction
which has been held, since the arm-
istice was signed, on promotions in
the army. A cablegram sent to Gen-
eral Pershing authorizes him to
"make six promotions among the of-
ficers of the line up to and includ-
ing the grade of colonel, as will give
the officers who, in his judgment,
deserve it, rank equal to the com-
mand exercised by them."
It was announced that the same
policy would be carried out with
respect to the army in the United
States. The promotions will be made
when necessary, to give officers rank
with the command they exercise.
FIVE NEOPHYTES INITIATED
AT BARRISTER'S BANQUET
James E. Chenot, '19L, was toast-
master at the fall initiation banquet
of the Barristers, senior law society,
held last night at Joe Parker's. Toasts
were given by T. G. Evenson, '19L;
Prof. Willard T. Barbour, and Prof.
Joseph H. Drake. The neophytes were
John Simpson, Leo J. Carrigan, Wil-
liam O'Connell, T. G. Evensen, and
J. A. Gornetzky, all of the 1919 law
class.
Socialist Party Strong in Elections
Berlin, Jan. 29. - Unofficial returns
from Sunday's elections to the Prus-
sian assembly without taking Pau-
sen's 21 delegates into considera-
tion, show the election of 142 social-
ists, 24 independent socialists, 87
Christian people's party, 41 Nation-
ists, 18 German people's party, 61
democrats, 6 Guelphs, and 1 demo-
cratic present.
The socialists are not likely to
have more than four of the Pausen
delegates, which would make the com-
bined socialist strength in the state
170 as against 231 Burgeoise dele-
gates.

All-Senior Dance Tickets Going Fast
Tickets for the All-senior dance
were reported to be selling fast last
night. About half of the limited
number were sold a few hours after
the sale was started and at the rate
they were going, there will be none
left by tonight.
,Beginning today tickets nmay be ob-
tained from the committeemen of the
various colleges, in addition to se-
curing them at the Union.

ROOSEVELT TO HAVE
MEMORIAL SERVICE
A memorial service for ex-Presi-
dent Theodore Roosevelt will be heldt
at 7:30 Sunday, Feb. 9, in-Hill audi-
torium, under the joint auspices of
the University and the city of Ann Ar-
bor.
At the call of Mayor Ernst M.
Wurter, a meeting of citizens was'
held Wednesday evening in the city
hall, and after a full discussion of the
character of the meeting, several
committees were appointed to ar-1
range a program for the memorial
service.
Prof. W. H. Hobbs was elected
chairman of the general committee,
and Registrar Arthur G. Hall, sec-
retary. The program will be an-
nounced later.
Slim Chance Here
For I. Iarleycorn
Hotel proprietors of Ann Arbor do
not propose to back the wets in their
petition for the use of light wines
and beer in hotels.
"Operating a hotel without a bar,"
said Mr. R. A. Carson of the Allenel
hotel, "is much more satisfactory to
a manager because of the undesirable
element that the sale of liquors al-
ways introduces. It is understood
though that such operation is not as
profitable."
"Considering the fact that for the
past five years the Whitney hotel has
had no bar," said Mr. James McIntyre,
its proprietor, "we should in all prob-
ability not take out a license even
though the hotels were given the
right to sell liquors."
Joe Parker, who probably needs no
introduction, said, "Should the sale of
liquor be allowed in hotels I would
not care to take out another license
because of the fact that the sale of
liquors always introducesanother at-
mosphere 'about the place. And as
I'm not as young as I used to be I'
do not feel inclined to deal with such
trade."

IN LARGE -UNITS
THINKS BAKER
SECRETARY BELIEVES IT UNWISE
TO SPECULATE ON UNIVER-
SAL TRAINING
GOVERNMENT MAY*
BUY ARMY CAMPS
Measure to Give Congress Authority
in Purchase of Army Camps
and Cantonments
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 30.-Purchase by
the war department of existing army
training camps would be prohibited
without specific authority from con
gress, under a resolution offered in
the house today by Representative
Anthony of Kansas, at the request of
members of the military committee.
The resolution was introduced after
Secretary Baker and Assistant Secre-
tary Crowell had appeared before the
committee to urge acquisition of the
national army cantonments and two
national guard camps. Numbers urg-
ed that the measure be introduced in
the house that more formal consid-
eration of it might be given by the
committee, as acting for congress.
Secretary Baker explained that he
considered the acquisition of the
land as solely a business proposition,
and that regardless of the size of the
future army, it would be the policy
of the war department to train men
in large units instead of small ones,
as in the past.
In response to questions by Repre-
sentative Coldwell, the secretary said
the department felt it was unwise to
speculate on universat training.
DR. R. PETERSON IN
MEDICAL WAR WORK

WILSON COLONIAL
POLICY ACCEPTED1
Paris, Jan. 30.-The announcement
was made in authoritive quarters to-
day that great colonial powers, not
Great Britain and France, had ac-
cepted in principle the American pro-
positions put forth by Wilson for the
League of NAtions for supervision over
German colonies and alloting their
administration to mandatory powers.
The communication issued tonight
makes official announcement that "sat-
isfactory provisional, arrangements
were reached for dealing with German
colonies and occupied territory of
Turkey in Asia," for the provisional
arrangement to which the communica-
tion refers is the acceptance and prin-
ciple of President Wilson's plan of
mandatory administering of the col-
onies.
The reference to occupied territory,
of Turkey in Asia indicates that Mea-
opotamia, Palestine, Armenia and Scil-
ia are brought within the scope of this
new policy of dealing with the colon-
ies.
Their basic idea of this policy is
that the colonies will be administered
by a mandate for the benefit of their
own people and not exploited as a pro-
fit making enterprise by the powers
claiming them.
New Tax Exemption Blank Issued
A new form of war tax exemption
blank has been recently furnished all
universities for use by employees
when travelling on university busi-
ness. The internal revenue bureau re-
quires that a separate blank be filled
out for each expenditure when the
payee represents the interests exempt
in which case one blank only is nec-
essary for everything.

Organization of the medical work.
of the draft boards of the state has
been the task of Dr. Reuben Pet-
erson of the University faculty since
Nov. 17, 1918. Dr. Peterson served
with the rank of major as special
aid to Governor Sleeper,but under
the command of Provost-Marshall
General Crowder's office.
When the draft law was first put
into operation, too many physically
unfit men were sent to the camps.
This entailed such a great and use-
less expense that one man in each
state was appointed to seek out a so-
lution. Dr. Peterson was chosen for
Michigan.
Examining Doctors Amateurs
The doctors who composed the ex-
amining boards were merely civilian
practitioners and were unfamiliar
with the requirements of army sur-
geons. Dr. Peterson instructeO them
in this work and regulated the physi-
cal standards so that a large number
of the rejections were made at the lo-
cal draft boards. At first, whenan ex-
amining doctor was in doubt about a
man, he sent him to camp anyway.
Later Dr. Peterson organized 24 advis-
ory boards in the state to which doub~t-
ful cases were referred.
Too Many Men Unfit
About 25 per cent of all men examin-
ed were physically unfit for general
service. Most of these cases were due
to defective hearts, eyes, teeth, ears,
and, feet. According to Dr. Peterson, a
large number of them could have been
overcome in childhood with proper
treatment. Never before has the health
of the country been benefited as 'by
these examinations, is Dr. Petelson's
opinion. It is for this reason that he
thinks that compulsory military train-
ing would do wonders for the future
men of the United States.

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