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January 30, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIL'

WAY RATES IN
J YORK TO GO UP

James F. Shaw, former president of
the American Electrical Railway, be-
lieves that the New York street car
lines will get an increase in their
rates in the near future. Mr. Shaw
says that the worst that can possibly
happen to.the New York railway sys-
tem has already happened and that the
city administration will surely give the
street railway a raise in rates. Shaw
says that the only thing that is the
matter with the railway system of New
York now is their starvation rates. He
goes on to say that not only the New
York traction system is badly in need
of an increase in rates but that there
have 'been receivers appointed for 29
companies throughout the country
during the last year, showing that oth-
er companies are in, the same pre-
dicament.
Engagement of B. L. Broadwell
The engagement of Baxter L.
Broadwell, '19, to Miss Adelaide M.
Dodge of Toledo was announced last
week in that city. Broadwell left the
University in 1917 to enter the mili-
tary service. N date has been de-
cided upon for the wedding.
University of Columbia has abolish-
ed the old style of entrance examina-
tions and substituted psychology tests.
SPALDING'S
For Shoes Belts
" w Foot Ball
MAK Equipment
"~ ., Sweaters
; %* ... Jerseys
And the implements for every
athletic game, of course.
A. G. SPALDING & BROS.
211-217 So. State St.
CHICAGO, ILL.

BETTER GRADE SHOE LEATHER
O W AVAILABLE; PRICE SAME
Leather for the manufacture and re-
pair of shoes is one of the raw prod-
ucts that has become much more plen-
tiful since the close of the war. Since
the government began outfitting the
large draft armies about a year and a
half ago, shoe leather for both man-
ufacturers and retail jobbers has been
exceedingly difficult to obtain and of
inferior quality.
The government contracted for vast
amounts, taking the best obtainable
and curtailing the supply to dealers.
Now, however, since the manufacture
of army shoes has ceased, the market
is fairly well stocked. Ann Arbor
buyers of leather report that they are
receiving much better grade stock
now for practically the same price
of two months ago. Also they are now
able to buy linen thread for the first
time in nearly two years.

FOR LIBERTY,

The following casualties are report-
ed today by the commanding general
of the American Expeditionary Forc-
es: Killed in action, 30; died from
wounds, 23; died of disease, 69;
wounded severely, 62; missing in ac-
tion, 40. Total, 224.
By an agreement between Harvard,
Yale, and Princeton, freshmen are not
allowed to compete on university
teams in intercollegiate athletic con-
tests.
Our Own Pack
Betsy Ross Candies
The Finest Candies For Gift
Purposes and Social Occasions
Modish Boxes, Baskets
and Containers

FITTING WOUNDED FOR
TRADES BIG PROBLEM
HERO WORSHIP IS OBSTACLE AC-
CORDING TO MAJOR
C. S. BERRY
With maimed and wounded soldiers
pouring into the country at the rate
of 10,000 a month, America is faced
with a huge problem of reconstruc-
tion; the problem of making them nor-
mal self-supporting citizens again.
Each individual case will have to be
taken up by a specialist who will aid
in helping the patient find what he is
best fitted to do. Major C. S. Berry, for-
merly a psychologist of the University
of Michigan; who is in Ann Arbor on
a furlough from a general hospital
near Washington, outlined the work
that the government is attempting to
do in its reconstruction work.
Restore Individuality First
According to Major Berry, the first
great task after the soldier has arriv-
ed in the general hospital in this coun-
try, is to get the patient to ceaseI
thinking about himself and his misfor-'
tunes and to restore his feeling of in-
dividuality. This is done by the ward
nurses and the specially trained aids
who teach the men crafts. Working
with their hands tends to make pa-
tients forget themselves.
Suitable Vocation Chosen
In the event that a man is physi-
cally incapacitated, Major Berry says
that his particular history is studied
by psychologists and he is trained in
some professional or mental pursuit,
the man's preference and apparent
latent ability being the basis of the
choice. If the man is'capable of vo-
cational training he is given the best
instruction possible. Then he is
watched closely and if he shows
adaptability he is given thorough in-
struction and afterward he has the
choice of entering a college or a trade
school, with his tuition and book ex-
penses paid, and an additional -$65
a month for general expenses. Con-
gress has given the vocational board
$2,000,000 to do this work.
Hero Worship Hard to Overcome
Major Berry goes on to say that the
greatest handicap that the returning
wounded soldier has to overcome at
the present time is the attitude of her%
worship that those at home bear to-
wards him. He finds it very difficult
to tear himself away from the admir-
ing friends at home even long enough
to take advantage of the opportuni-
ties offered by the government. After
a few months, hero worship will wane
and then the soldier without special
instruction is very apt to be non-self-
supporting.
HOOVER EXPLAINS
FOOD SITUATION

RAILROAD RUNNING
AIDED BY LETTERS
Twice as many commendations as
complaints by the general public is
the record of the Federal railroad ad-
ministration which recently published
the report of mail received during the
period of the war by the administra-
tion's bureau of suggestions and com-
plaints, under the direction of Theo-
dore H. Price. On the 24th of Decem-
ber 16,424 letters had been received
by the office, which contained 11,666
commendations, complaints and sug-
gestions. A considerable number of the
criticisms offered were of positive aid
to the railroad administration in or-
ganizing its service.
Mr. McAdoo states that every letter
received by the bureau has been an-
swered and that statements concern-
ing employes were used as a basis in
giving rewards of merit and correcting
discourtesy. The total number of com-
plaints received was 714 as against
1,328 letters of praise for politeness or
efficiency on the part of the federal
employes. Since the signing of the
armistice, the number of unfavorable
reports has diminished daily as the
railroad conditions gradually return
to normal.
CERCLE FRANCAIS INITIATES
NINE NEW MEMBERS TUESDAY
Initiation of nine new members
was the chief attraction at the meet-
ing of Cercle Francais Tuesday
night. Initiates were: Blanche Goodell,
'19; Beatrice Beckwith, '21; lone
Brown, '20; Anne Kirkpatrick, '20;
Katrina Schermerhorn, '21; Lee
Wodruff, '21; Eva Welsh, '20; .M.
Mangouni, '20, and Lucille Duff, '19.
This was the last meeting of the
Cercle for this semester. The next
meeting will be held during the first
week of next semester.
International Tennis to be Resumed
An international flavor will be given
the 1919 English tennis champion-
ships, as many playerstrepresenting
the Allies are expected to enter. The
All-English club wishes to hold this
event at Wimbledom.
Permission is being sought in the
United States to re-establish in 1920
the Davis cup contests discontinued
since this country entered the war.

social functions were made at a meet-
ing of the social committee held Tues-
day. A smoker is planned for Tues-
day evening, Feb. 11, providing per-
missioncan be obtained from Prof. L.
A. Strauss.

registered late last year. About
men have signed up for these cour
so far. Each man is given a cert
amount of work which must be do
Daily Want ads bring results.

Freshman Engineers Plan Smoker'

U

Mr. Osias Zwerdling Announces

that he has returned to Ann Arbor after several days visit
in New York City and other style centers in the East. He has
brought with him an extremely fine line of

Fine Furs

They are very choice and consist of a fine range of styles in all
of the most desirable garments. These Furs were bought at a
very low price and thus can be sold at less than real cost of
manufacturing. Even if you do not need furs this season, you
will be making a good investment by purchasing for next season

The University of Toronto is

Plans for the freshman engineers' to give special courses for mi

New Patterns of Cloth for
Ladies' Garments

A fine lot of fabrics for ladies' garments has also been received.
All of the season's new popular shades and colors are included.
Ladies needing new garments, and who want the best, should
call and inspect.

Osias Zwerdling
Ladies' Tailor and Furrier
Zwerdling Blnck-217 E. Liberty St.

Phone 1380-F1

p

High Class Only
No.9. Nickels Arcade

I

I

I

- - - -
.a..SHOES

sand RUDDERS
BEST QUALITY at LOWEST
PRICES. See
ABE LEVY
205 N. MAIN ST.
Opposite Postoffice

A

"Act & 6t ea.V fPA? .,

r

I
_

DRESS FOOTWEAR

TOSCHA

SEIDEL

FOR WOMIEN

DISTINGUISHED RUSSIAN VIOLINIST

The Girls are Preparing
They want to look their best "over here" to entertain the boys
from "over there. Parties, entertainments and personal calls
demand the Daintiest Slippers to make their appearance com-
pletely satisfying.
Silver and Gold Cloth
-French Kid and Pat-
ent Pumps -- Oxfords
or Two-eyelet South-
ern Ties. Light, Dain-
ty, Dressy Models, all
sizes.
Walk-Over Boot Shop
115 S. MAIN ST.

HILL AUDITORIUM

SATURDAY, FEB. 8--8 O'clock

I

I

4r
PIANOS, VICTROLAS AND RECORDS, MARTIN
GUITARS, MANDOLINS AND UKULELES
AND ALL MUSICAL SUPPLIES AT
Schaeberle & Son's Music House
110 S. MAIN STREET PHONE 254-F1

Herbert C. Hoover, United States
food administrator, and director gen-
eral of the international relief or-
ganization, gave out the following
statement in regard to the food sit-
uation in the United States today.
"The dominating food problem in
America at this moment is the prob-
lem of the American farmer. Taking
it broadly, before the European war
began we exported about 5,000,000
tons of food a year. This year we
were prepared to export at the rate
of from 15 to,'20 millions of tons.
The increase represents the patriotic
service of the American farmer, plus
the voluntary sacrifice of the aver-
age American.
"The armistice came suddenly, free-
ing shipping from military use and re-
opening to thepAllies the cheaper
southern hemisphere and the colonial
markets.
"We are thus faced with a serious
problem with respect to our own
great supplies, patriotically accumu-
lated. Therefore in the period be-
tween the armistice and peace we have
a difficult situation to face.
"It is impossible, however, to de-
mobilize the whole of these intricate
forces set up during the war, in a
week. So, pending these solutions the
American farmers, merchants, pack-
ers, and banks simply must stand to-
gether for two or three months to
carry our excess over until the mark-
ets of the world have been more ex-
tended and finally liberated by peace."
Army Officer Makes Record Flight
Lawton, Oklahoma, Jan. 28.-Lieut.
R. H. Baker recently broke all rec-
ords when he flew 90 miles in an air-
plane in 20 minutes flat. His 12 cyl-
inder De Haviland plane flew from
Fort Sill to Oklahoma City at a speed
of 270 miles per hour.
Use the Daily to reach the students.
Four thousand students read it every
morning.-Adv.
The Daily at your door every morn-
ing, $2.50 until June.-Adv.

Tickets-$1.00 $1.60 $1.0

GOOD NEWS---

All New Fall Suits, O'Coats 1-4- off

It's going to be

easy

to be well

dressed this season.

Course Tickets-$4.50 $5.00 $5.50 $6.00
At School of Music

FITFORM

clothes for Young Men will take

care

C ____
I1k F\t\M
cam..

of that for you.

Don't worry about price. Pay enough
to get good clothes.
In Fitform we are offering the most for

the money

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Fine large rooming house
in perfect condition. Low rent.
Will furnish house if desired. Phone
536-J or 1619-W.
FOR RENT-Fine suite of rooms near
campus. Phone 1172-M or apply 718
Monroe St.
FOR RENT-One desirable suite and
one single room. 445 S. Fourth Ave.
Ph-n 779-.

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-One gas range suitable
for boardig house or fraternity, 18
mahogany finised dining room chairs
2 dining room tables. 803 S. State.
Tel. 1370-J.
WANTED
WANTED- An opportunity to serve
you. Let the Daily restore that lost
article.

We're Ready to sholv New Styles
In Spring Clothes
TOM CORBETT

N.

116 E. LIBERTY ST.

BETWEEN MAIN AND FOURTH AVE.

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