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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 30, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-30

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CLOUDY
X,, CO

PROBABLY
LDER

S.itr t43an

DIat

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DA V AN) NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE.

i

VOL. XXIX. No. 89. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

REDS CONTINUE
TO SHEL ALIED
AND us S. FORCES

RETIRE TO STRATEGIC BEND
RIVER; PROTECTED BY
FORESTS

IN

PRESIDENT. SAYS
CONDITIONS

FINE

Cablegram States U.
Russia Show in
Shape
Archangel, Jan. 28
The American and

S. Soldiers In
Excellent
(delayed). -
Allied forces

WASHINGTON PARTY
FEATURE AT U N ION
Ushering in the new semester's so-
cial season will be the Washing-
ton's Birthday party to be held Fri-
day evening, Feb. 21, in the old
Union building. This will be the
first of the larger all-campus events
of the new term.
A six piece Shook's orchestra will
be on hand from 9 to 12 to furnish
the type of jazz that just naturally
creates pep. There will be decora-
tions galore, there will be programs,
there will be - but the committee
promises much, perhaps you'd better
find out for yourself. Certainly there
will be competition for an opportu-
nity to attend, for the limit is set at
100 couples.
Seidel to Play
Teacher's Alusic
Three numbers which have been
arranged for violin by his former
master, Leopold Auer, will be in-
cluded in the program which Toscha
Seidel will give at his concert at 8
o'clock Saturday evening, Feb. 8, in
Hill auditorium.
' He will render the following se-
lections:
I
Chaconne ...... .,..............Vitali
IT
Concerto No. 3...........Saint-Saens
Allegro non troppo
Andantino quasi, allegro
Molto moderato e maestoso
III

Nearly Home Officers Jump;Swim
New York, Jan. 29.--home soil looked so good to two army
officers whose transport, the Scranton, was forced through having
explosives aboard to anchor in the lower harbor today, that they
jumped overboard and started swimming toward the Brooklyn shore,
200 yards away. They were picked up by a small boat and upon being
landed disappeared. Debarkation headquarters indentified the men
as First Lieut. H. L. Bourgardes, of New York, an aviator, and R. S.
Rose, a signal corps officer, whose address was not available.

operating south of Archangel evac-
uated ,Shegovarsk ,yesterday and re-
tired 10 miles to the northward. The
bolsheviki continue to shell the
Ameircan and Allied positions at
Tarasevo and Tulgas.
Retire to Strategic Positions
The forces which retired from She-
govarsk, which is about 65 miles
north of Ustvadenga (the Allied po-
sitions farthest south a week ago)
today halted their march northward
and established their positions with-
in the villages of Vistarka and Ust-
sana, on opposite banks of the Vaga
river, at a strategic bend in the
stream about 10 miles north of She-
govarsk. The positions are pro-
tected by forests through , which
there are no winter trails in the im-
mediate vicinity.
Wilson Says Moriale Is Good
The President's cablegram fol-
lows:
"Replying to your cable of Jan.
7, recent report from Colonel Stew-
art, commanding American troops in
Russia, states that after complete
tour of inspection he finds general
health, discipline and morale of
troops to be excellent. Their living
conditions are good, except at ad-
vanced outposts where usual field
conditions exist. The front line
troops are rotated to prevent undue
hardship. Sanitary conditions and
conveniences are most primitive, but
clothing and equipment are excel-
lent. The men have become accus-
tomed to the rigors of the primitive
conditions of life there and are per-
forming most valuable services. The
American troops are scattered with
the Allied troops over a front of 400
miles, usually not more than one
American company serving intact at
any one place. You will see from
this report that the conditions seem
generally as satisfactory as they can
be made.
(Signed) "WOODROW WILSON."
iolshevism Even
in Colleges Now
Bolshevism is now 'being expound-
ed by students of some of the uni-
versities, according to recent re-
ports in the college papers of the
country.
The most radical steps along this
line have been taken by the stu-
dents of the University of Chicago,
so the latest reports state.
It is thought that the movement
started in the weekly meetings of the
Y. M. C. A. where open discussions
of world problems were carried on.
"From these meetings new ideas have
spread over the campus and an un-
usual progress of intellectual thought
is growing rapidly," was the state-
ment made by one of the students of
the University o Chiago. "Even
this campus itself," he said,. "is go-
ing to take notice of the fact that
great ideas are loose in the world."

(a)
(b)
(c)

Nocturne...........Chopin-Auer
Mazurka ........... Chopin-Auer
Turkish March.. Beethoven-Auer

IV
(a) Hebrew Lullaby .........Achron
(b) Gypsy Airs .... ....Sarasate
MEN INTERESTED IN DEBATING
ASKED TO ALPHA NU MEETINGS

t

First year men and others who are
interested in oratory and debating are
invited to attend the meetings of the
Alpha Nu literary society which are
held at 7:30 o'clock every Friday
evening on the third floor of Uni-
versity hall.
Officers for the next semester are:
president, Carl G. Brandt, '20; vice-
president, James K. Pollock, Jr.,
'20; secretary, Archie D. McDonald,
'19; treasurer, William H. Messin-
ger, '21.
LOAN MAY BE POSTPONED
TWO WEEKS AS LENT COMES
Washington, Jan. 29. - Because
the Lenten season this year does not
end until April 20 the treasury is
considering postponing the opening of
the next Liberty Loan campaign
from April 6, as ostentatively plan-
ned, to April 21. A decision has not
been reached.
No attempt has been made as yet
by Secretary Glass or his advisors
to settle on the interest rate or other
terms of the loan, it was stated offi-
cially.,
ONLY SENIORS MAY PROCURE
TICKETS FOR SENIOR DANCE
Tickets for the All-senior dance
will go on sale at 7 o'clock this even-
ing in the new Union building. The
price is $2 a couple, and'tickets are
limited to 100 couples. As this is
strictly a senior affair, the sale of
tickets is limited to seniors exclu-
sively.
MICHIGAN UNION WILL HAVE
DANCES AS USUAL THIS WEEK
The regular Union week end danc-
es will be'given as usual this week
in spite of examinations. The tickets
for the Friday and Saturday night
dances are $1 and 75 cents, respec-
tively. Tickets are on sale now at
the desk in the lobby of the Union.

SENATE TO SETTLE
CONTRACT CLIMS
EXPECT T0 AUTHORIZE SECRE-
TARY TO CONFIRM CONTRACTS
MADE LATE
Washington, Jan. 29.- Prolonged
discussions of amendments and of the
Hitchcock substitute prevented the
senate today from reaching a final
vote on the military committee's bill,
to validate and permit the settlement
of informal war contracts aggregating
$2,750,000. In moving 'a recess, 'Sen-
apr Chamberlain, of Oregon, in charge
of the measure announced that he
would endeavor to keep the senate
in session tomorrow until the legisla-
tion has been enacted.
Under the Hitchcock substitute,
which it is planned to dispose of soon
after the senate meets tomorrow,
claims growing out of the cancella-
tion of war contracts would be adjust-
ed by a commission composed of a
representative of the war department
of justice, and the business interests
of the country. In urging its adoption
today, Senator Hitchcock said he
thought the adjustments should be
made by disinterested parties and de-
clared that the committee bill would
authorize the secretary of war to vali-
date contracts made even the day be-
fore the armistice was signed, and
upon which not a dollar has been paid.
PRIZES AWARDED AT
CAMPAIGN DINNER
A total of 179 memberships was
obtained by the city Y. M. C. A. In
its recent membership campaign. At
the final campaign dinner given at
the city "Y" last Tuesday evening, it
wa reported that the team captain-
ed by Mr. Clyde Elliot won the con-
test with a total of 1,131 points. Mr.
Fred E. Heusel was the highest in-
dividual point winner. I
The pair of rabbits which was to
be awarded to the highest point
winner was given to Mr. Heusel 'in
recognition of his work. Mr. Heusel
passed the rabbits on to the young
son of Mr. Carl Malcolm. The boy
has worked in the campaign along
with the older men and has a favor-
able amount of work accredited to
his name.
After the banquet, which was serv-
ed by the Ladies' auxiliary, speeches
were made by Mr. L. L. Forsythe,
Principal of the Ann Arbor high
school, who .presided at the ban-
quet, and by Mr. Heusel.
LUDENDORFF IN BERLIN
UNDER ASSUMED NAME
London, Jan. 29.-General Luden-
dorff, former chief quartermaster
general of the German army, has re-
turned to Berlin and is living in a
small villa under an assumed name,
according to an Exchange Telegraph
dispatch from Amsterdam, because he
fears popular demonstration. The gen-
eral is said to have placed les serv-
ices at the disposal of the govern-
ment, which, it is added, declined
them with thanks.

FEDRL PROHIBITION
AMENDMENT PASSES
LEGISLATIVE ACTION INEFFEC-
TIVE UNTA 90 DAYS AFTER
ADJOURNMENT
Albany, Jan. 29.-New York ratified:
the federal prohibition amendment
tonight.
New York, Jan. 29.-The action to-
day of Frank L. Polk, acting secre-
tary of state, informally proclaiming
ratification of the prohibition amend-
ment to the federal constitution, is
not yet binding, according to the
contention in a statement received is-
sued by a representative committee
representing the distillers' associa-
tion of America.
No Legislative Action at Once
Of the 42 states whose legislators
have acted on the amendment, the
constitution of 22 contain a referen-
dum prohibition provision which es-
pecially provides that no action of
the legislature becomes effective un-
til 90 days after adjournment. If
during these 90 days five o six per
cent of the voters petition for a ref-
erendum the action of the legislation
must be submitted to the people.
Of these 22 states, the committee,
the legislatures of 14 are still in ses-
sion "and the 90 days in which to pe-
tition for a referendum have not be-
gun to run." Thedcommittee an-
nounced that immediate steps would
be taken to have a referendum in-
voked in these 14 states and "proba-
bly in others."
Need Necessary Three-Fourths
Considering only these 14 states
and deducting thec from the 42, whose
legislatures have acted, the 'commit-
tee said, showed that the drive had
captured only 28 states or eight less
than the necessary three-fourths.
The 14 states referred to are: Ar-
kansas, California, Colorado, Idaho,
Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska,
Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Utah,
Oregon, and Washington.
WILHELM MAY GO
BACK TO GERMANY
Paris, Jan. 29.-Field Marshal von
Hindenberg, according to the Echo de
Paris, is endeavoring to bring about
the return of former emperor Wil-
liam after the meeting of the national
assembly. Leading German manu-
facturers in Westphalia are said to
be interested in the plan.
The newspaper adds that the former
emperor wrote to Premier Ebert that
he would accept whatever residence in
Germany was assigned to him. Ebert
is said to have replied that only the
national assembly would be qualified
to decide the question.
Emily Loman to Attend Y. W. Meet
Emily Loman, '19, was appointed
delegate to the Y. W. C. A. confer-
1o auqeo atgo o 2ueem u1v aoue
the University Y. W. C. A. held yes-
terday afternoon at Barbour gymna-
sium. The conference will meet Feb.
20-23 at Evanston, Ill.

FACULTY DECIDES
FATE OF STUDENTS
As the result of the card-playing
in The Michigan Daily offices by
three members of the staff, and as
the result of the printing of an ar-
ticle by two other members which
was in direct opposition to the or-
ders of a University authority, the
faculty of the literary college yester-
day found it necessary to discharge
those implicated.
The first three students were
reprimanded, and debarred from par-
ticipatian in any form of student
public activity for a period of two
years. For disobeying the authority
request, one student was debarred
from any connection with student
publications for one year. The other
was placed on proation and debar-
red from participation in any stu-
dent activity for two years with the,
provision that in case of violation of
this action, the student be suspend-
ed for one semester.
France Grateful
Says Jean Petit
"America will never love France
as well as France loves America,"
said Monsieur Jean Petit, of , the
French department, when he ad-
dressed the students of Ann Arbor
high school yesterday. "By this, I
do not mean that America does not
love, France with all her soul, but
that France has one more reason to
love America; it is the debt of eter-
nal gratitude she owes to America
for coming to her rescue at the dan-~
ger hour and helped make it possi-
ble for France to always remain
France.
"New conditions created in France
by the war," he continued, "will
make it necessary for the Americans
to learn French, as France will de-
pend upon the Americans for the re-
construction work. Likewise the
study of English which the French
have considered heretofore a pleas-
ure and a courtesy will become for
them, for the same reason, a neces-
sity.
"To acquire a reading knowledge
of French is no longer sufficient;
the students must learn how to speak
and understand the spoken French in
order to truly know the French peo-
ple."
ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION TO
AID IN CAMPUS DRAMATICS.
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister has called
a meeting of the Oratorical associa-
tion reorganization committee for 4
o'clock Friday afternoon to be held
in room 302, Mason hall.. Members
of the oratorical faculty will be pres-
ent and representative members of
the Adelphi, Alpha Nu, and Athena
societies have been invited. Profes-
sor Hollister hopes that final ar-
rangements for the association can be
made at this meeting.
It is planned to have periodical
meetings of the reorganized associa-
tion, the membership of which will
be limited to those interested in or-
atory, debating or dramatics. The or-
ganization expects to aid campus
theatrics and hopes ultimately to de-
velop a campus theater.
Organization of this new associa-
tion will not include in its program
the dissolution of the old societies.
POLICE TAKE UP FIVE BULL
DOGS FOUND UNMUZZLED

Five bull dogs, taken off the streets
because they were not wearing muz-
zles, are being held at the police sta-
tion awaiting the arrival .of their
owners. The -police department will
insist that the city ordinance con-
cerning the muzzling of bull dogs be
respected. All dogs not wearing
muzzles will be taken to the city
building and the owners fined.

RECOGNIZE POLE
GOVERNMNT IN
UNITED STATES
LANSING CONGRATULATES NEW
PREMIER; SAYS GLAD OF
NEW RELATIONS
HEAR DISCUSSION
ON POLE CONFLICT
Delegates Asked to Explain Rostill-
ties and to Take Measures to
Abate These ConditIons
Washington, Jan. 29.-Recognition
of the provisional government of
Poland has been acceded by the
American government, officials of the
state department said today in mak-
ing public a message which Secretary
Lansing at Paris has sent by direc-
tion of President Wilson to Ignace
Jan Paderewski, the new Polish pre-
mier.
Mr. Lansing congratulated Mr. Pad-
erewski upon becoming head of the
Polish government and said the Unit-
ed States would be glad to enter into
relations with the Polish state as soon
as possible.
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 29.-The supreme coun-
cil today heard R. V. Dmowski, the
Polish delegate, and Dr. Karl Kra-
marz, representing the Czecho-Slo-
vaks, with reference to the conflict
which has arisen between the Polish
and Czecho-Slovak military forces
along their frontier.
The hearings were.a sequel to the
council's warning against occupation
of territory by force, and the dele-
gates of the two countries were in-
vited to explain the hostilities and to
take measures to abate them.
General Louis Botha, the South
African premier, was also heard oi
the former German colonies.
Backs South Africa
Australia is insisting the secret
treaty be carried out, giving her the
islands south of the equator. South
Africa wants the adjoining German
Southwest Africa, which is the one
highly civilized African territory at
stake and valuable far beyond the
populatjon and area in copper and
diamond deposits, and a flourishing
cattle industry. The British posi-
tion is that they are willing German
East Africa, the Kameroon and To-
goland, together with the old Turk-
ish possessions of Asia, be placed.
under international control but is
supporting her dominion's claims.
France is supporting the dominions
because the decision on the Sar coal
fields is yet to come, and Italy,
wanting Jugo-Slav lands, supports
the position of France.
(Continued on Page Six)
B~uy Your Student
Directory -Today!/
The Student's directory, long ex-
pected and much delayed, is out to-
day. The book will be on sale today
only, at University hall, the flag pole,
the Engineering arch, the head of the
campus, and the office of the Michi-
gan Daily. The price of the direc-
tory is 50 cents.
In addition to the names, class,
year, addresses and telephone num-
bers of the students of Michigan and

Ypsilanti, the usual information con-
cerning the faculty, and a list of stu-
dent organizations, the directory this
year contains a complete roster of
the- S. A. T. C. and the naval unit,
which will be of great historical in-
terest.
After today the directories may be
obtained only at the directory office
in the Press building.

I .

I

Students' Directory
On Sale Today

Today Only

Today Only
Price, 50c

It Flagpole

U- Hall

Engineering Arch

Head of Campus

Daily Office

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