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January 29, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-29

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THE WEATHER
PARTLY CLOUDY
AND COOLER

ttrl t ,I t

fIatll,

ASSOCIATED
l)AY ANDl)NIGHT WJILE
SERtVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 88. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

BILL. DRAWN BY1
FOOD OFFICIALS
KEEPS WHET UP
BIG APPROPRIATION ENABLES
GOVERNMENT TO KEEP ITS
GUARANTEE
PERMITS PRESIDENT
TO EXERCISE POWERS
Gives Government Power to Control
Dealers, Millers, and Elevators;
Agencies to Buy
Washington, Jan. 28.-An adminis-
tration bill appropriating $1,250,000
to enable the government to carry out
its guarantee to the farmer at a
price of $2.20 a bushel for the 1919
wheat crop, was transmitted to the
chairmen of the senate and house ag-
ricultural committees today by the
f oon administration.
Drawni by Food Administration
The maesure which was drawn by
officials of the food administration
and the department of agriculture was
described by some senators as an om-
nibps measure which would permit
the President to continue the food
administration and to exercise all the
powers conferred on him by the food
control act.
Senator Gore, chairman of the sen-
ate committee, announced that he
would not introduce the measure in
the senate.
"It is broader than I think is nec-
essary," he declared. "I may take it
as a basis for another bill which I
may introduce."
Gives Many Powers
The bill as drawn gives the gov-
ernment power to control grain
dealers, millers, and elevators "by li-
-ense or likw powers" would be con-
tinued, and the President would be au-
thorized "to create any agency or
agencies" to buy the 1918 and 1919
wheat crops or products, or other
food stuffs and feeds at the guaran-
teed prices, regulate exports and im-
ports of wheat, require separate rail-
road service as long as the railroads
are under government control, con-
tdol grain exchanges and prohibit
trading upon them "at such time or
times as they be deemed desirable or
proper to meet market conditions and
competitive prices of foreign grown
wheat."
President Wilson would also be au-
thorized "to prescribe such rules and
regulations as may be 'deemed neces-
sary to protect the government of the
United States from paying the guar-
anteed prices aforesaid for any
wheat othe'r than that governed by
proclamations.
DEAN JORDAN TO ENTERTAIN
'WOMEN'S JUDICIARY COUNCIL
Members of the Women's Judiciary
council will be entertained at lunch-
eon, Thursday, by Dean Myra B. Jor-
dan at her home, 1215 Hill street.
The judiciary council bears the same
relation to women as the Student
council does to men. It is composed
of the president and vice-president of
the Women's league and of one repre-
sentative each from the senior, junior
and sophomore classes. The members
of the council this year are Doris Mc-
Donald, '19, president of the Women's
league; Emily Powell, '19, vice-presi-

dent of the league; Anne MacMahon,
'19, representing the senior class;
Marion Ames, '20, from the junior
class, and Cornelia Clark, '21, repre-
senting the sophom )re class.
Architect Returns from Great Lakes
John H. Page, '20A, who has been
stationed at the Great Lakes training
station in the drafting department, has
returned to continue his studies in the
university.

FROSH COMMITTEE
PLANS FOR FROLIC
Lively freshman pep was display-
ed at the meeting of the social com-
mittee of that class held yesterday
afternoon at Martha Cook building.
Plans were made for several affairs
to be held during the spring by the
yearlings. Matthew Lamport, '22,
chairman, with the committee st
dates for two All-fresh mixers and
the Frosh Frolic. Providing Prof. L.
A. Strauss, director of student af-
fairs, passes on the plans, the first
class event will be a mixer held
March 8 in Barbour gymnasium.
The Fresh Folic will be the larg-
est' affair and is planned to excell all
former parties. April 25 has been set
as the date for this affair, which will
be held in the old Union building.
Probably another All-fresh mixer will
be given between the dates of the
above events.
Whether or not these plans receive
the full sanction of the committee on
student affairs will be announced in
about a week.
A uer' s Protege
to Appear Here
Toscha Seidel, the 19-year-old violin-
ist who will appear Feb. 8 in Hill au-
ditorium, had mastered Berlot's "Con-
certo" at the age of eight. When 12
years of age he attracted the atten-
tion of Prof. Leopold Auer who immed-
iately accepted him as a scholarship
pupil.
The young musician studied for six
years under the direction of the mast-
er, and in 1915 made his first public
appearance in Christiana. Subse-
quently he toured Denmark, Sweden,
and Norway, winning during his third
season the greatest honor of his car-
eer, a tour of joint recitals with Leo-
pold Auer.
Following his sensational debut, he
was booked by the Metropolitan Mus-
ical bureau for his first American tour,
which includes 23 appearances with
leading orchestras and recitals
throughout the largest musical cen-
ters of the country.
MICHIGAN CENTRAL VIADUCT
WORK NEAR COMPLETION
Abutments for the Michigan Cen-
tral viaduct near Ypsilanti have
been completed and the forms are be-
ing removed. Those in charge believe
that the remaining work can be fin-1
ished within a month or two. The
county engineer has his men at work
filling in the approaches, that the
earth maysettle by spring, when the
crossing will be connected to the ce-
ment road to Detroit by pavement..
The construction men are now at
work and the iron work which can-
not be held up by the cold weather
as was the concrete work and no
more setbacks are looked for.
VAN TYNE URGES CORRECTIONS
IN UNITED STATES HISTORY
Prof: C. H. Van Tyne has contrib-
uted an article entitled "Democracy's
Educational Problem" to the latest
issue of the Michigan history maga-
zine. Professor Van Tyne sets forth
therein the misconception of the re-
lations of America and England
which is due, he declares, to the
prejudices perpetrated by text books
dealing with the American revolu-
tion. The writer urges that this
error be corrected for the sake of the
future welfare of democratic peo-
ples.

Professor Smeaton Speaks to Chemists
Prof. W. G. Smeaton addressed the
University Section of. the American
Chemical society yesterday in the
Chemical building. He lectured on
the subject of "The Early History of
the Elements." At the close of the
meeting the business of the society
as taken up.

Immigration Prohibited By
New Bill; Relatives flay Come

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 28.-Prohibition
of emigration for four years after the
war, except from Cuba, Mexico, Can-
ada and New Foundland, was agreed
upon unanimously today by the house
immigration committee.
, Chairman Burnett announced that
he would ask for a special rule to
permit early consideration of the
measure by the house.
"If the bill is not passed by the
present congress, its purpose will be
partially defeated," Mr. Burnett said.
"It is intended to prevent a great

flood of immigrants coming here *as
soon as peace is signed and driving
our people out of work, and also to
keep out the bolsheviki. Delay in
passing the bill will be harmful to
the best interests of the country."
Considerable discussion was arous-
ed in the committee in regard to
whether the bill should be effective
for two or four years, but the longer
period was decided upon by a vote
of seven to two. A number of amend-
ments accepted permit the admission
of relatives of aliens already in this
country and of persons skilled in cer-
tain occupations and professions.

i

RESIGNS POFPESSOSIP
TO REMIN_IN SERICE,
PROFESSOR N. FOSTER WILL
CONTINUE DUTIES IN MED.-
ICAL CORPS
Former Prof. Nellis Foster who
left the University Medical school in
August, 1917, and who has subse-
quently been in the medical service
of the army, has resigned from the
University in order to continue his
duties in the medical corps.
It was but a short time after leav-
ing that he was offered a position in
the Red Cross'expedition to Serbia.
While considering this he was given
the opportunity of joining the medi-
cal branch of the United, States army
as a major, which offer he accepted.
He was immediately put in charge of
the hospital at Camp Meade. In ad-
dition to the caring for the patients
he also taught classes of doctors sent
from the hospitals after a period of
interne training.
A few weeks ago he was called to
the surgeon-general's headquarters
in Washington to assist in the or-
ganization of a teachers' staff. Major
Foster was recently promoted tq the
rank of lieutenant-colonel.
U. S. PROPOSES RELEASE
OF WIRES ON DEC. 31, 1919
Washington, Jan. 28.-Government]
control of telephone and telegraph
companies would end next Dec. 31,
under a resolution ordered favorably
reported today by a house postoffice
committee by a vote of 10 to 8.
Chairman Moon announced that he
would present the measure in the
house tomorrow and ask for a rule
to give it right of way. The reso-
lution made no mention of cable prop-
erties, federal control of which was
assumed by presidential proclama-
tion last November under the author-
ity given in the original wire control
resolution, and it is understood that
phase of the situation was not dis-
cussed by the committee.
Swiss Propose to Revise Constitution
Berne, Jan. 27 (delayed). - The
Swiss parliament opened today in ex-
traordiary session with a view to a
total revision of the constitution in
a democratic direction and further
the extension ;of the rights of the
people. The proposals include pro-
portional elections for the national
council and an increase in the num-
ber of members of the government
from seven to nine.
Local Draft Board Will Soon Close
Work at the local draft board office
is nearing an end and Pte. W. T.
Groves, who is now in charge of the
office, expects his discharge during
its existence.
Prof. Demmon Leaves for Florida
Prof. Isaac N. Demmon left yes-
terday afternoon to spend the winter
in Florida. He was not accompan-
ied by Mrs. Demmon.

SHIPPING BOARD STOPS
CONTRACTS ON VESSELS
EXPERTS FAIL TO SPECIFY THE
TYPE OF PEACE
SHIPS
(By Associated Press)

Washington, Jan. 28.-Orders

to

ship yards not to begin work on
ships aggregating from 1,000,000 to
1,250,000 dead weight tons, the keels
of which ordinarily would not have
been laid before next Aug. 1, are
now being sent out by the shipping
board. Charles Piez, director general
of the emergency fleet corporation,
said today that the yards on both the
Atlantic and Pacific coasts were ef-
fected.
The reason for the order, Mr. Piez
explained, is that types of ships,
which will be found advisable to con-
struct under peace conditions, have
not yet been determined by the com-
mittee of experts which is now en-
gaged in this work.
RAILWAYS UNDER
MC ADOO, PRAISED
Washington, Jan. 28.-W. G. Mc-
Adoo, director general of railroads,
announced today that the Bureau of
Suggestions and Complaints, estab-
lished last Sept. 3, has received a to-
tal of (0,424 letters from citizens of
all parts of the country in regard to
the government management of the
railroads. While this bureau was
conceived for the purpose of allowing
the public to make complaints and
suggestions, over half of the corre-
spondence received has been of a
commending nature instead of com-
munications of disapproval or dis-
courtesy.
All letters received by this depar-
ment have been investigated and an-
swered promptly and an aggregate
of over 40,000 letters have been han-
died by this department.
Purdue Plans to Aid Farmers
The Division of Rural E'ngineering
and the extension department of Pur-
due have devised a plan of sending
sets of blue prints of all kinds of farm
buildings, to lumber dealers for exhi-
bition. This is to give farmers an
idea of the latest types of farm ;build-
ings.
Denmark Orders Bolsheviki to Move
Copenhagen, Jan. 28.-Dr. Suretz,
the bolsheviki representative in Den-
mark, left here today with his lega-
tion staff at the request of the Danish
government. He was notified that his
further presence was not desired in
Denmark.
$600 Essay Contest On at Illinois
Six hundred dollars in prizes are
offered by the- student department of
the Y. M. C. A. at the University of Il-
linois to students who submit the best
1,000 word "essays on "The Signifi-
cance of the Foreign Missionary En-
terprise in Making the New World."

GEN. WOOD TO TALK
TO DETROIT GRADS
Major Gen. Leonard Wood, com-
mander of the Central Department of
the United States Army, will be the
guest at a luncheon of the University
of Michigan club at Detroit this'noon,
and will speak on "Making Ameri-
cans Out of Americans." General
Wood, who is the father of the Platts-
burg idea, was one of the first ad-
vocates for preparedness in this coun-
try. Having been one of the Rough-
Riders in Colonel Roosevelt's famous
regiment and a staunch friend of the
late Colonel, he is also a firm believ-
er in universal military training.
The visit from General Wood has
aroused a great deal of interest in
Detroit. Last night he spoke to a
crowded house at the D. A. C. The
luncheon will be held at 12.10 o'clock
at the HotelTuller. General Wood
wil begin speaking at 12.30 o'clock
that he may return to Chicago in the
afternoon.
At Last- Winter
Has Almost Come
At last the coal man, the possessors
of new fur coats and the polar bears
in the Belle Isle zoo are happy again.
The coal man after spending a couple
of anxious weeks wondering whether
to build a refrigerator plant or to go
south for the winter, has again opened
his office.
The owners of new fur coats have
been puzzled also, telegraphing moth-
er to ask her advice as to whether they
ought to put them in cold storgae.
Fortunately mother said no or Ann
Arbor deales would have been fair-
ly swamped.
The miracle of returning cold weath-
er was all that saved the poor Belle
Isle bears for they were on the verge
of heat prostration according to their
keeper. With heat making sleep out
of the question, for the last two weeks
they have been pacing restlessly up
and down their cages trying to com-
pose their shattered nerves. Some of
the nearby trees, in a sympathetic
mood, tried to help out the poor beasts
by putting on a little foliage to pro-
tect them from the merciless January
sun, but of no avail; the weather man
was the only one who could put across
the miracle, but it certainly took him
long enough to do it.
MILITARY MOTOR CONVOY
STOPS IN CITY OVER NIGHT
Ann Arbor once more took on a
military aspect when 40 army motor
trucks arrived in the city Tuesday.
The trucks, manned with a complete
complement of drivers and mechanics,
are enroute from Detroit factories to
Chicago and constitute companies A
and B of the 19th supply train.
The trucks were parked on streets
xtear the Armory, where the men were
billeted for the night. Each man had
his own cot and blankets in the
trucks, but meals were supplied them
at city restaurants.
The detachment is in command of
Lieut. C. A. Paul and is followed by
two more companies, which will ar-
rive in the city today.'
PROFESSOR CRANE CONFERS
WITH WAYNE AUTHORITIES
Prof. R. T. Crane of the political
science department is in Wayne,
Mich,., today conferring with the city

authorities on the subject of munic-
ipal government. Professor Crane
does work of this nature under the
auspices of the extension depart-
ment of the University.
Regular extension credit courses
being conducted -ty members of the
faculty in local towns will be delayed
in their semester examinations. Due
to the restrictions caused by the late
epidemic in many cities the courses
were delayed over a month in some
cases.

NATIONAL LEADERS
EXCHANGEIEWS ON
G ERMNCOLONIES
DELEGATES OF MANY COUNTRIES
MEET; DISCUSS QUESTIONS
OF IMPORTANCE
CONSIDER, LEAGUE
OF NATIONS IDEAS
Australia, New Zealand, China and
Japan Have Representatives
at Meetings
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 28.-President Wilson,
the prime ministers of the British
Empire, France and Italy, and the
representatives of Japan devoted the
entire day to an exchange of views
on the. German colonies in. the far
east, in the Pacific, and those in Af-
rica.
Two meetings of the peace confer-
ence were held. Representatives of
France, China, Italy, Australia, New
Zealand, China, and Japan were pres-
ent at the morning and afternoon ses-
sions.
Consider Application of Plans
In addition to the fundamental
principies of the league of nations be-
ing discussed, the application of such
a union was also considered.
The official communication issued
today of the peace proceedings reads
as follows:
"The President of the United
States, the prime ministers of the
British Empire, France, and Italy,
and the representatives of Japan held
two meetings today, the first from 11
o'clock this morning to 12:30 o'clock,
and the second from 4 to 6:30 o'clock
this afternoon.
Chinese Delegates Psent
"An exchange of views took place
on the German colonies inthe far
east, in the Pacific, and those in Af-
rica.
"The representatives of the do-
minions were present at these two
sessions; the representatives of China
at that in the morning, and the Mar-
quis Salvago (Italy) at that in the
afternoon.
"In the morning the delegates of
Australia, New Zealand, China, and
Japan were heard.
French Explain Views
"In the afternoon Henri Simon,
French minster of the colonies, ex-
plained the diews of his department
on colonial questions.
"In addition the fundamental prin-
ciples of the league of nations and
their application were considered.
"The next meeting will take place
at 11, o'clock tomorrow morning."
ATHENA ELECTS OFFICERS
FOR SECOND HALF OF YEAR
Election of officers for the second
semester was the feature of the
meeting of the Athena Literary so-
ciety last evening. Those honored
were:
President, Mable Bannister, '19;
vice-president, Anna McGurk, '20;
secretary, Ida Mines, '20; treasurer,
Velva Gifford, '19; oratorical dele-
gate, Ida Gratton, '20.
The meeting then adjourned to a
joint meeting with the Adelphi in
their rooms.
G. E. Nye Returns for Second Semester
G. F. Nye, '19, who enlisted in the

navy last spring, has returned to the
University to enroll for the second
semester. Nye was student manager
of the basketball team and of the Uni-
versity band last year.
Purdue Band Has 65 Members
Purdue's band made its first appear-
ance last week. It is composed of
68 members.

Students
ly On
U- Hall Engineering Arch

Directory
Sale Thursday

I One Day On

One Day Only

ole

Head of Campus

Daily Office

Price, 50c.

.

..

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