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October 10, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

, VI V'..rill IN UP L/

71L L

A

have taken several small

ER

villages and straightened out
line.

their

6362 MICHIGAN MEN IN
SERVICE, 4412 ARE GRADS.1

nued from Page One)
le enemy to postpone the
great St. Gobain massif and
important strategic posi-
on and Le Fere.
esistance also is being im-
he Germans against further
>f the French and Ameri-
hampagne and east of the
rest. West of the forest
ans have driven their lines
the region of Cornay, where
effected a junction with the
d seemingly the Argonne
will be in Allied hands. On
i side of the Meuse the

Reports persist that the Turkish
cabinet has fallen and that the new
grand vizier will be Tewsik Pasha,
whose sympathies are declared to be
pro-Ally rather than pro-German. Ru-
mor also has it that the Turks have
dispatched a peace note to the Allies
through the Spanish government.
255 More "Flu" Victims in Michigan
Lansing, Oct. 9.-Two hundred and
fifty five new cases of Spanish in-
fluenza were reported to the state
board of health, today. Of these 32
were in Battle Creek, and 82 in Jack-
son.

49

HAVE GIVEN LIVES; ROLL OF
HONOR TO BE PUBLISHED
AFTER WAR

ESTABLISHED 1818
MADISON AVENUE COR. FORTY-FOURTH STREET
NEW YORK

By a count taken from the Alumni
catalogue office in Memorial hall
Wednesday afternoon, it was found
that 4,412 Mchigan graduates are now
in service, while 1,950 non-graduates
are also with the colors. A total of
49 University of Michigan men have
died while serving in different branch-
es of the service. Since May, Mr. H.
L. Senseman, the director of this work
has sent 34,000 circulars to former
students and alumni, in order to ascer-
tain their most recent addresses, and
data about them. These circulars were
sent especially to get a count on
Michigan men now in service. Only a
small percentage of them have been
returned at this data and it may be
expected that there is twice as many
alumni in the service as have re-
turned the circulars.
All information and correspondence
of every student who has ever enter-,
ed the University is kept in files in
the Alumni catalogue office and the
records are kept as up-to-date as pos-
sible. After the present war a com-
plete "Roll of Honor" for the Univer-
sity will be published by this office
as was done after the Civil war; print-
ing all. the names of those who have
taken part and those who have lost
their lives. The Michigan Alumnus
will soon publish the names and ad-
dresses of alumni in service in or-
der that their classmates may get in
touch with them. This list "will not
be completed for about two months.

Telephone Murray Hill 8800

Our Representative
will be at the
HOTEL PONTCHARTRAIN, DETROIT
Tomorrow and Saturday
October 11 and 12
with Samples of Ready made Clothing
Furnishings, Hats and Shoes
Send for Illustrated Catalogue

TON SALES-OFFICES
ONT COR. BOYLSTON STREET

NEWPORT SALES-OFFICES
220 BELLEVUE AVENUE

Y
C

W. MEMBERSHIP
AMPAIGN IS ON

I

YOUR

)OKS and SUPPLIES

re AT m

SHEEHAN'S
IY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

1

rNDON

719 N. University

nn Arbor representative dealer in EASTMAN KODAKS, films
nd supplies, and photographer to Michigan Students. We do
HE amateur finishing business in Ann Arbor because we do
e kind that brings them and keeps them here. - -:-

1905.

Growing bigger and better every day since.

1YLISH FURNISHINGS
THAT YOUNG MEN LIKE

With 268 members as a start the Y.
W. C. A. will launch its annual mem-
bership campaign today and will con-
tinue it for a week. One hundred per
cent membership of University wom-
en is the aim. The 85 women who
will work on the campaign will have
a supper tonight given by the advis-
ory board of the Y. W. C. A. at Bar-
bour gymnasium, at which time
short talks will be given by some of
the women.
ENCAMPED MEN MAY VOTE
AT OWN STATE ELECTIONS
Washington, Oct. 9.-According to a
recent ruling by Acting Secretary Cro-
well men in the army at home and in
camps will be allowed to vote at-the
primary and general elections of their
states. State representatives of po-
litical organizations will appoint cer-
tain election officials who will go in-
to different camps, establish head-
quarters, and register the men and
take their votes.
Literature fora the instruction of
men in the manner of casting their
votes may be circulated in the
camps, but literature designed to in-
fluence them in regard to their selec-
tion of candidates is forbidden.
Sept. Draft Registrants Being Called
Calling of September registrants for
physical examination was begun by
the local draft board yesterday. Men
between the ages of 19 and 37 will
be examined first as they will be the
first ones called. The quota of meu
scheduled to leave here October 7 ex-
hausted class one of the June and
August registrations. These men have
not yet left for cantonments as all en-
trainment of draftees has been sus-
pended until the influenza epidemic
subsides. Orders have been received
here, however, to prepare to entrain
men of the September registration in
the near future.
Upper Class Men to Get Special Work
Washington, Oct. 9.-Through the
National Research Council, the Medi-
cal department of the Army will agi-
tate a movement for American col-
leges and universities to give third
and fourth year students special train-
ing which will enable them to quali-
fy as officers in the medical depart-
ment. The appeal is especially
directed toward scientific students
whose courses feature zoology, path-
ology and bacteriology.

MADME MATENAUER
IS HERE FOR VISIT WITH
FRIENDSS; MAJOR CRESSY ALSO
ON PROGRAM
Margarete Matzenauer, of Metropol-
itan opera fame, and her celebrated
accompanist, Frank LaForge, surpris-
ed the students of Ann Arbor high
school Wednesday afternoon at chapel
exercises whentthey gave a short pro-
gram. The noted contralto has been
visiting at the home of Prof. Louis A.
Strauss on Cambridge road since Sun-
day, and her presence in the city has
not been widely known. She is here
on a rest and will remain for the
week.
Her program met with enthusiastic
applause from the student body and
faculty. The contralto aria from
"Samson and Delilah" was her feature
number, and when she sang the "Mar-
seillaise" she received a hearty ova-
tion from the audience. Wednesday
afternoon's program was impromptu,
and she will give no other concert
while here in the city.'
Major 'Cressy Talks
At this time also, Major W. H. Cressy
of Grand Rapids, who volunteered his
services to Russia before the United
States entered the war and who has
seen active service as a doctor in the
Russian ad Serbian armies, gave an
address about his recent experiences.
"Don't criticize the Russians," he
said, "they are a patriotic nation and
I love them." He expressed his opin-
ion that southern Russia would regain
herself and serve as an important fac-
tor in prosecuting a successful term-
ination of the war. Major Cressy saw
some of the fiercest battles that Russ-
ia fought, when he had charge of sev-
eral hospitals on the Russo-Turkish
front and lie described the absolute
control of the Turkish and Bulgarian
armies by German over-officers.
Tells of Serbia's Sacrifice
He told of the heroic sacrifice made
by Serbia and could not commend her
too highly. "If Serbia had accepted
the peace terms offered to her before
we entered the war the Huns would
have been in our territory by now,
he explained. Serbia is the only Al-
lied nation that has lost her entire
country and out of 5,000,000 inhabit-
ants she has lost 4,000,000 and is still
fighting. Serbia is a wedge between
the Balkan states, and the Mediterran-
ean sea, and has protected the British
armies operating in that part. If she
had surrendered the kaiser would
have built by now his coveted Bagdad
and Slavonic railroads. The Germans
could also have entered France from
the south and overpowered her and
hence worked her way north to Brit-
ain and finally to America. In closing
he warned the students not to look for
an early termination of the war as
we could consider ourselves lucky if
the war was over within two years.
WHAT'S GOING 'N
TODAY
3:30-Junior-freshman tea at Bar-
bour gymnasium.
8-Chinese students banquet at Lane
hall.
U-NOTICE
..Choral Union rehearsal Tuesday
night at 7 o'clock at the School of
Music.
Lieut. Gardner, '17, Weds G. Pixley, '18
Announcement has been made of the

marriage of Genette Pixley, '18, to
Lieut. Dick B. Gardner, '17, at St.
Joseph, Michigan, Wednesday after-
noon, Oct. 9. Miss Pixley was a mem-
ber of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority
and Lieutenant Gardner was a mem-
ber of Delta Upsilon. Lieutenant
Gardner is now stationed at Camp
Oglethorpe, Ga.
May Make Airplanes in Chicago
Chicago, Oct. 9. - Airplanes. on
government order may soon be manu-
factured in Chicago. Many Chicagoans
are, interested in the project, but no
decision can be reached until John D.
Ryan, director general of the air serv-
ice, returns from France. It is not
known whether air-craft plant facili-
ties are to be extended, but if they
are, Chicago will be considered.

ALSO

ANNA CASE - SAT.NOV.16
Prima Dona Soprano
GODOWSKY - SAT. DEC. 14
Russian Pianist
BONNET - SAT. JAN. 18
French Organist
SEIDEL - SAT. FEB. 8
Russian Violinst
SEASON TICKETS

CARUSO

CARUS 0

ALL ON SATURDAYS

Sat.

Cp.

C

ALL
NEW
OODS
FOR
)R FALL
(INTER

QUALITY
MAKES

THE

OUR

FO

PRICES

W

VERY LOW

$4.50, $5.00, $5.50, $6.00
(Including Car so Concert)

NEEDED TO GO WITH YOUR
FALL AND WINTER SUIT

SHIRTS
Fine silk in
[ors and no

plain
velty

d
y
1 y
.; ,.,
"' + '+. Vii'
r
c , e
i
'4* + .,
wY + laic ""'1 I
,: ''':

UNDERWEAR
All styles and
weights in service-
able garments.

For CARUSO CONCERT ONLY
$2.50, $3.50. $4.00, $5.00

TIES
tty patterns,
all sizes

HOSE
Fine quality,
all sizes

To make it possible for members
of the S. A. T. C. to attend

all of the dates

have been

Keep in mind that this store is the home of

.changed to Saturdays

4 " 1 .

HART SCHAFFNER & MARX-
CLOTHING
MENSE STOCKS, ALL SIZES, ALL COLORS,
SHADES AND PATTERNS. HIGHEST
QUALITY TO BE FOUND
ANY PLACE
REULE, CONLIN & FIEGEL
Largest Clothing Store in Washtena1y County
Southwest Corner of Main and Washington Streets

Embargo on Movies on Account "Flu"
"Buy Way Soldiers Fight"-Says Foch New York, Oct. 9.-The national as-
New York, Oct. 9.-"Buy the way sociation of motion picture industries
your soldiers fight," is the substance decided at a meeting here tonight to
of Marshal Foch's cablegram in re- discontinue all motion picture release
spouse to a request for an expression until Oct. 15, because of the epidemic
of his sentiments on the fourth Lib- of influenza. The embargo will re-
erty loan. The text of the cablegram main in force until further notice.
was
"The fourth Liberty Loan will be a Takes High School Elocution Class
magnificent success if your fellow citi- Mr. Jesse E. Thornton, instructor in
zens put the same spirit into the sub- English in the University, has tem-
scriptions that your soldiers put into porary charge of a class in public
battle." speaking in the high school.

Tickets on Sale at

Uni versity Sch'oolfML
Mr. Caruso uses the Hardman piano exclusively. Tour
direction of the Metropolitan Musical Bureau, New York

..2.2.

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