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January 25, 1919 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-25

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IOBABLY RAIN
WARNER

.42

Bk iAwn

~aitll

ASS .7CIAAED
PRESS
PAli YA.Nl) Ni(;iIT wiHE

OL. XXIX. No. 85.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1919.

PRICE THREE C

e
LSON REQUESTS ENORMOUS
SUM TO CHECK SPREAD OF
BOLSHEVISM

PRESIDENT WILL
BE GUEST IN N. Y.
President Harry B. Hutchins will
be the principal guest at the 18th
annual reunion of the University of
Michigan club of New York, to be
held Friday evening, Feb. 7, at the
Automobile club of America in New
York city.
This reunion in many ways will
break every precedent in the history
of the club. For some years the en-
tertainment committee has been
planning a reunion with no banquet,
no toastmaster, no evening dress, no
set speeches, and no formal program.
A reception to President Hutchins.
is planned at 6 o'clock, followed by a
table d'hote dinner served in the Au-
tomobile club grill. After the dinner
there will be a smoker.
SOLONS1, GT IDEAS FOR
IMPROVING UNIVERSITY

CONSIN SENATOR
OPPOSES NEW B I

LLj

La Follette Urges U. S. to Utilize
Appropriation for Employment of
Discharged Soliers
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 24.-After a week
of spirited debate the senate tonight
by a vote of 53 to 18 passed the ad-
ministration bill appropriating $100,-
000,000 for food relief in Europe and
the near East. The fund was re-
quested by President Wilson as a
means of checking the westward
spread of bolshevism.
The measure now goes to confer-
ence for adjustment of minor senate
amendments, but leaders believe final
action will be accomplished next
week.
Feed Friendly Nations First
Senator Martin, of Virginia, a Dem-
ocratic leader, and Senator Overman;
of North Carolina, and Senator War-
ren, of Ohio, were appointed senate
conferees, r
the most important senate amend-
ment changed the house setion
%gainst feeding enemy peoples so
that nationalities friendly to the
Uited States and the Allies may be
aided. All amendnent designed to
limit the power of President Wilson
pr Food Administrator Hoover in dis-
tribution of the funds were rejected
recently by the senate and no final
efforts were made today by the a4i-
tiow,
PI Majority in Fayor
On the final roll call 15 Repubi-
cans and three Democrats voted
against the bill's passage, while 4
Demnocrats and 19 Republicans joined
in its support.
Opponents of the bill }Bade a final
stand against it today, with $en4tors
la Fqllette, of Wisconsin, Borkh, pf
Idoha, and Shernan, of Illinois, lead-
ing the fight. senator lnox, of Penn-
sylvpsnia, Colt, of Uhode Island, and
smith, f Michigan, both spoke in spp-
part pf the apprpriation.
1jaFollette Strongly Opposes
┬ženator La- Follettg vgorously said]
the bill was neither a war, a pace,
or charitable measure an declared
that "the horps and hoofs of the beef1
trust" should be son through the
bill's "nantel of charity.t'
Dclaring the unepployment situa-
tien in America was "grave and men-
acing," Mr. La Follette sid ggprrn-
ment resgurces should be used for
Amneriean problems, rther than t
aid hlEuropeai peopilep.
P.ris Vo gierene ritipise4
just befopre the roll call, Senator
Borah asserted that not more than
flye per cent of the senators actually
fgvred the ,bill, and that while feel-
Inf constrained to support It, they
made apology for their votes later,
Senators, he said, were yielding their
judgment to the Paris conference
which he criticised for alleged se-
crecy, declared "that its daily com-
muniques mean absolutely nothing."
Newberry Dorm3
Changes Policy
Following the example of Martha
Cook dormitory, Newberry will be-
come a residence for upperclass wom-
en only. Next year a certain number
of freshmen will be allowed, as the
new plan is not to take effect until a
year from next autumn.
Pealyiyra D. Jordansays in re-
gar4 lo, this matter "The chance to
lIv in *ewpery 'will be given to
girls who havQ proven themselves
be ;iot only good students, but help-
ful and generous in their houses X41
op thl campus, an4 loyal to Newber-

STATE COMMITTEES
LEGISLATURE ON
NEEDS

TO AVI E
CAMPUS

Senate and house committees from
the state legislature were entertained
by the University yesterday, during
their bi-yearly tour of inspection. In
the morning they were accompanied
through the University hospital and
the new library building by the Uni-
versity authortifn receiving sugges-
tions as to lgislation needed on ad-
vised improveinents, the nature of
which cganot be announced at this
time.
Four Michigan Alumni
The committee lunched with Pres-
dent Harry B. Hutchins at the new
Union, and some of the members
spent the afternoon looking over the
other buildings of the campus. The
inspection was, for all but one of the
state legislators, one of memories as
well as duty, as four of the six mem-
bers of the delegation are Michigan
alumni,
Wil Advise egisature
The personel was as follows; Hon.
Harvey A. Penney, '3, of Sagnaw,
chairman of the University commit-
tee in the senate, Hon, Peter G. Len-
non, '03L, of Lennon, chairman of the
house committee; Hon. A. G. Griggs,
Pontiac; Hon. Geo. G. Hunter, '97,
of Ovid; Hon. James A. Harris, '9L,
and Hon. Fred . Dunne, of High-
land Park.
The eonlmittees returned late Fri-
day afternoon to Lansing, where tey
will bring the Buggested improve-
ments to the attention of the legisla-
ture.
QUARTERDECK ADDS
FIVE NEW MARINES
Whittling ty boats out of bits of
wood and sailing them around in a
dishpan of water used to be called
mere babies' play, and was looked
upon with scorn by the grown-ups.
But now such days are past and even
the learned University students de-
light in sailing hand made ships
around in dishpans set under the eng-
ineering arch. In plain ordinary Eng-
lish, Quarterdeck, the marine engin-
eering society, initiated five juniors
at their last meeting. The neophytes
were: G. H. Anderson, C. R. Ford, E.
B. Schultz, C. L. Stanley, and F. G.
Schwalbe.
JESS WILLARD AGREES'*TO
FIGHT FOR $100,000 PURSE
Chicago, Ja.n 24.-A purse of $100,-
Q00 to Jess Willard drew the heavy-
weight champion out of retirement to-
night. Tex Rickard, promoter of the
heavyweight championship battle be-
tween Jeffries and Johnson, after $wo
days' fight, made the arrangements.
He agreed to box any Rumber of
rounds up to 40. 'The match will ie
decided next July, proahly t th
fourth. Willar will re.eive $1O0,QO
wn, lose, or drag.
Rickard said that Carpetier r
Dempy would be Willird's oppnent.
The contest will be the tfrst for Wil-
lard since he met Mora ip New York
March.. 9W1.
Overheatd Fur aCe guses small Fire
?{o serious damage was done by an
v egheated furnace which caused a
small fire early Friday morning in
the home of William Gates, 326 East

POLISH ATIST-S
TO STARTONIGHT
Music of Native Land Will be Given
by Concert Players at Local
High School
VARIED PROGRAM OFFERED;
YOUTHFUL DANCER TO APPEAR
With the hope of disseminating the
music and culture of their native land,
prominent Polish artists will appear
in the Polish concert tonight to be
given in the auditorium of the local
high school. The conert is held un-
der the auspices of the Cosmopolitan
club.
The program will be built around
Miss Elsie Konieczna, 12-yearoldI
pupil and protege of Pavlowa, who will
render the Polish national dance and
PavIowa's "Gavotte." Miss Konieczna
won recognition a few years ago in
her successful competition with danc-
ers and teachers for a place in the
Pavlowa Russe Ballet, then starring
in Detroit.
.Dancer to Star
Next in number will be Miss Jean-
ette Kruszka, notedtballet dancer,
whose execution of the "Golden But-
terfly" in Milwaukee to the satisfac-
tion of Josyln Gibbons, renowned dance
authority with the Serge de Diagleff
Ballet Russe, won for her signal dis-
tinction. She will present a Pader-
ewski ballet dance and "Scharweka's
Dance," s
Many Artst
Among the other artists will be Mr.
Jan Szulezewski, graduate violinist of
the Chicago Conservatory of Music,
who will render the "Sednd Polon-
aise Brillante," and Miss F. Szul-
czewski, accomplished pianist, who
will give a recital of Chopin's "Scher-
zo." Miss Anna Kowalska, mem*ber
of the Ganapol School of Music of De-
troit, will sing two Polish songs.
,lg Time Ahead at
Fancy Dress Ball
There is one "big time" in store for
all who attend the Fancy Dress ball
which will be given at 7:30 o'clock
tonight in Barbour gymnasium by
the war work committee of the
Women's league. Special novelties
will be on the program.
Dormitories and sorority houses
have arranged to empete in groups
for the honors of the evening. Among
those entering the contest are repre-
sentatives from the following houses:
Martha Cook, Newberry, Alumnae, Pt
Beta Phi, Caryatides, Kappa Alpha
Theta, Alpha Phi, Kappa Kappa Gam-
ma, Delta Gamma, Chi Omega, Beta
Phi Alpha, and Gamma Phi Beta.
Also remember the various booths
where all kinds of good things to eat
will be sold. Those in costume will
have to pay the admission fee of 10
cents. Spectators will 'be charged 15
cents.
This money will go for the war
work of the Women's league.
INDIANA DEFEATED BY IOWA,
' 21 TO 10, AT BLOOMINGTON
Bloomington, Jan. 24.-Iowa defeat-
ed Indiana 21 to 10 in a western Con-
ference basketball game here tonight.
The visitors took the lead at the be-
ginning of the game and were never

headed.
New R. 0. T. C. Established at Pennsy
A new reserve officers' training
corps will be established at $he Un-
versity of Pennsylvania with Major.
Charles T. Griffith as head of the de-
partment and professpr of pilita'y
science ands tactics, it was announcedo
yesterday..
The governme }t will detail addi-
tional teachers, selected from the jn-
ited State army. to assist the mnajor
The cpurse will be yolpntary.
Kaiser Saws Wood fvr Exercise
Amero4 gen, p1land, Jan, 24,-Saw-
ing wood codtinues to be the chief oc-
cupation of the former German emper-
or, who spends several hours each
morning and afternoon within the
castle grounds working hard, while
several men servants respectfully hand
him logs and then pile the short sticks
in heaps for use in the furnaces of
the castle.4

MUST RECOGNIZE
RUSS REVOLTION
Cannot Approve Bolshevik Policy,
However, Says President t
Wilson
EFFORTS MADE TO HASTEN
LEAGUE OF NATIONS PLANt
(By Havas Agency)
Paris, Jan. 24:-President Wilson's
plan for dealin with the Russiant
problem includes the "unconditionalf
recognition of the revolution" by thet
representatives of the associated pow-
ers, according to the Paris Petit Pa-
risien newspaper, which declares its!
information comes from "an especial-e
ly authorized source." Of this rec-
ognition its informant says:
"This must be construed as imply-
ing recognition from all the conse-
quences of the Russian revolution as
far as the former government of the
czar is concerned, but in no way is
it an approval of the bolshevik pol-
icy."
Bolsheviki In Danger
Both the Paris Journal and the
Paris Petit Parisien point to the dan-
ger in which the bolsheviki are re-
ported to stand in losing Petrograd.
They declare that a defeat at Novas
ought to be regarded by the soviet
government as a serious warning.
Urge Immediate Adoption
(By Associated Press);
Paris, Jan. 24.-Responses to de-
niands in the United States and Great;
Britain, which are echoed from Ger-
many, for an immediate conclusion
of the peace query, efforts are be-
ing made to hasten the adoption of,
a plan of a league of nations. It,
Is declared to be a conviction of,
the delegates that no definite pro-I
posal can be made until certain
definite questions have been an-
swered by the congress.
Such questions as the re-ar-
rangement of boundaries, the as-
sumption of indemnities and repara-
tion, and the creation of constituted
authority, are regarded as the bas-
is of the treaty of peace, and not 1
only the American delegates, but al-
so the British and French delegates
are understood to be of the opinion
that these questions can be safely
composed in special peace treaties,
but must be founded on the gen-
eral principles forming the basis
of a league of nations.
Delegates May Leavye Soon
Another consideration is that if
the treaty of peace is signed first,
there will be little disposition among
the delegates to linger in Paris to
complete a league of nations.
Vaccination Urged
by Health Service
Three new cases of pneumonia and
one death, all among people between
20 and 30 years old, have been re-
ported to the University Health serv-
ice during the last 24 hours. Pneumo-
nia is a disease especially prevalent
among young adults. For this rea-
son Doctor Wessinger urges all stu-
dents to be vaccinated against this
disease. The Health Service has on
hand plenty of pneumonia vaccine,
recently received from the army
medical school at Washington and
guaranteed by the government. The
vaccine is free to students, who may
be vaccinated without cost at the

Health Service.
Princeton institutes Capel Service
lrincetqn has instituted aid will
commence witl the beginning of next
week, a new system for morning
chapel. Under this new plan there
will be six leaders of the chapel
service, one for each regular day in
the week,
Rotary Clubs Plan Fine Program
An elaborate program is being plan-
ned for the joint meeting of the Ann
Arbor and Ypsilanti Rotary clubs
Wednesday, Jan. 29. . Details of the
program and the place of meeting
have not yet been decided upon
No R. 0. T. C. at Oberlin; Men Object
It was impossible to obtain the con-
sent of 100 men to establish an R. O.
T. C. at Oberlin. This is the minimum
number required to establish such a
unit.

WAR RECORD FORM
TO BE DISCUSSED
Whether -the record of all the Uni-
versity men who served during the war
will be made in card index or book
form will be discussed at the next
meeting of the committee appointed
by the Board of Regents to compile
a war service record. The committee
will meet Thursday, Jan. 30.
If this record is published in book
form, the committee will judge wheth-
er it will be sold, given away, or a
few copies kept on file at the Uni-
versity. The plausibility of making
the Civil war record, which is now
complete, will also be discussed at
the meeting.
The committee is composed of Re-
gents F. B. Leland, chairman, and
J. 0. Murfin, Of Detroit; W. L. Clem-
ents, of Bay City, and Profs. H. L.
Senseman, F. N. Scott, and A. L.
Cross.
DONALHAINES, AUTHOR
OF 1919 OPERA, ARRIVES
WRITERS OF LYRICS TO MEET
THIS MORNING; TRYOUTS
LATER
Donal A. Haines, '09, author of this
year's Union opera, will arrive in Ann
Arbor this morning to consult with
those interested in the production.
The music writers are to hold a con-
ference with Mr. Haines at 10 o'clock
his morning at the new Union and men
intending to try out for the cast will
meet at 3 o'clock at the same place.
Lineup Sought
This latter consultation will not be
viewed in the light of a tryout, but
will be held for the purpose of lining
up the prospective actors and giving
them an idea of what will be expected.
Suggestions Acceptable
Although the book is fully complet-
ed, the author is willing to make
changes to incorporate any additions
which may be suggested.
The music writers are bdsy finishing
up a few incomplete sections of the
score. About 10 composers are con-
tributing to the 1919 line of melodies.
LOANS FOR WOMEN'
NOW OBTAINABLE

Final Score 21-13; Minnesota On
Other Undefeated Conference
Team
Michigan's basketball team was d
feated by Chicago 21 to 13, at the Mi
way, last evening. 4The Wolverine
fought hard but the Maroons on the
own floor were too much for Mitchel
team.
Makes Third Straight Victory
Taking the lead early in the gam
it was soon apparent that Chica
was going to make it their thi
straight win. Gorgas, the Maroon ce
ter, played thestar game of the e
ning. His floor work was exceptio:
al and had it not been for the b
veteran, Michigan might have carri
away the honors.
Karpus performed well for MiU
igan worrying the opposing guar
by clever dodging. The Wolverin
were poor on shooting and lost nu
erous baskets which should have be
made. Both Cohn and Williams a:
played their usual good game, the 1
ter being the biggest factor in keepi
the Maroon's score so low.
May Win Conference Title
Chicago appears to have a good o
portunity for the Conference til
Their team is composed of veters
and their teamwork, is unusual. M
nesota is the only quintet which nc
remains undefeated excepting Chic
go, and they will be one of the tea
which will probably be fighting f
the title at the end of the seasc
Illinois, although having been defe
ed in their first game, is another te;
that is composed of veterans and
feared by the Maroons.
Northwestern Next Rival
The Wolverines will play Northwe
ern at Evanston this evening. Coa
Mitchell believes his team to have
good chance for an even br'eak on t
trip, expecting to have little trou
defeating the Purple.
S. A. T. C. DEMOBILIZATION
CAUSES ATTENDANCE DECREA
Demobilization of the S. A. T. C.
the University of Iowa caused a fa
ing off of the attendance but the
ficiency was made up by men retu
ing from the camps and overseas.
The change has had a marked eff
on the enrollment of the law sch
which had tripled its numbers o
the fall attendance. University
thorities expect the pre-war stand
to be reached soon. '
Registration in the freshman eng
eering class is 30 per cent larger th
ever before. Dean W. G. Raymond
tributes this to the recognition of
increasing importance of engineer
in reconstruction work.

KARPUS STARS
MITCHELL

CHICAGO DEFEATS
MICHIGAN THROU OUGI~
MAROONS RETAIN LEAD GAINI
IN EARLY PART OF
GAME

FOR
QUINT

Girls who need financial help are
urged to see Dean Myra B. Jordan at
Barbour gymnasium immediately in
order that loans may be arranged ear-
ly in the semester. During the first
semester 11 girls were given schol-
arships, ranging in value from $25 to
$150. No money is loaned to fresh-
man girls or to any student during'
her first semester of residence.
All loans are made payable one yearC
after graduation. The money is loan-
ed without interest until the date of
maturity. After this time 5 per cent
interest is paid. No girl has ever
failed to pay the money borrowed,
most of them paying before the date
due.
Scholarship funds now amount to.
$30,000, in addition to the Barbour
scholarship of $100,000 for Oriental
women. In most cases only the in-
come is loaned. Last year $1,325
was loaned. This was the income
from one scholarship alone.
ARMY KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS
KEEP STUDENTS' OPEN HOUSE
Students are welcome at any time
at the K. of C. house on State street.
The house, which is maintained by the
Army Knights of Columbus, will not
be closed until June. Mr. L. J. Ken-
nedy, who is the secretary in charge,
says that there is a study room, -a
reading room, a pool and billiard
room, and showers at the disposal of
the students.
Baker, ex-Princeton Athlete, Killed
Forty-five minutes after his re-
lease from the U. S. air service, Cap-
tain Hobart A. H. Baker was killed
near Toulon, France, December 31.
The famous ex-Princeton athlete in-
sisted on taking a final flight in a
newly repaired Spad. When only 150
meters high the engine failed and hel
crashed down, being killed instantly.
Few at U. of T. Want Compulsory Drill
Only seven members of the Engi-
neering college at the University, of
Toronto are in favor of compulsory
drill.

Educational Conference at YpsWl
Speakers of national reputation
educational circles are on the :
gram of the mid-year educational c
ference to be held next Thursday,
day, and Saturday at Ypsilanti S
normal. The meetings promise to
of more than ordinary interest,
should bring a large representa
from the teachers of the state.
sessions are to be held on the Nor
campus.

,_A

Demobilization of Negroes Discuss
Problems connected with the
mobilization of the negro soldiers wE
the subject of the discussion at t
annual meeting of the Tuskegee
stitute conference. Dr. Emmet
Scott, secretary of the Tuskegee nor
al and industrial institute and sp
ial assistant to Secretary of V
Baker, was the principal speaker.
Hildner Talks on Eutope'n Literati
Prof. J. C. Hildner spoke to
members of the Cosmopolitan c:
last evening on European literati
and its relation to the social clas
of Europe. The meeting was folk
ed by a general discussion of
npech by members of the chh

t for Service
as decided to
emester hours

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