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January 23, 1919 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-23

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED;, PROBABLY
*RAIN,

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY ANTD NIGHT WIRE
SERIIiCE

i
I

VOL. XXIX. No. 83. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

_ - -

ALLIES ASK RUSS
TO SEND ENVOYiS-
BACK REVOLUTION
ENTENTE TO SEND MISSION TO
POLAND TO STUDY
CONDITIONS
CONGRESS TO DISCUSS,
WORLD LEAGUE JAN. 25
Russian Representatives Meet World
Leaders on Feb. 15 at Princes
Island
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 22.-France favors im-
mediate armed intervention by the
Allies of Poland, according to unof-
ficial information. The French view
is cited to be that only military as-
sistance can save Poland from being
crushed by the Bolsheviki and that
such assistance must be given with-
in the next few weeks.
Paris, Jan. 22.-An official bulletin
issued by the Press Bureau this aft-
ornoon says:
Allies Recognize Russia
"The proposals of President Wilson
were approved, including recognition
by the associated powers of the right
of the Russian people to direct their
own affairs without dictation from the
outside. The powers, do not wish to
exploit Russia.
"The powers ratify the revolution
and in no way countenance a counter
revolution. They wish to serve Rus-
sia unselfishly and invite all organ-
ized groups in Siberia, or within the
boundaries of European Russia as it
stood before the war, to send the rep-
resentatives to Princes Island to meet
representatives of the associated
powers, provided there is a truce of
arms meanwhile.
Entente Meet Russ Envoys Feb. 15
"Such representatives are expected
to be at the appointed place by Feb-
ruary 15.
"A plenary session of the confer-
eice Saturday will discuss Mr. Lloyd
George's proposals for a league of na-
tions." '
Paris, Jan. 22.-The supreme coun-
cil of the peace conference took up
the Polish question when it assem-
bled today. Marshal Foch, the Al-
lied commander-in-chief, was present
and was consulted on the subject.
Allies Sena Mission to Poland
A discussion resulted in a decision
by the council to send at once a mis-
sion to Poland comprising eight dele-
gates; one military and one civilian,
from the United States, France, Italy
and Great Britain.
Rival A rtistry to
Compete at Party
University women are urged not to
forget the fancy dress party which is
to be given Saturday evening by the
Women's league in' Barbour gymna-
sium. The dormitories and many
league houses are planning to go in
group costume, and prizes will be
awarded to the prettiest, the ugliest,
thc cleverest and funniest creations.
Prizes will also be given to individ-
uals.
The advisory board of the Women's
league, which is comprised of Dean

Myra B. Jordan, Mrs. . E. Beal, Mrs.
Warren P. Lombard, Mrs. Herbert
Church, Mrs. William Bishop, Mrs. Al-
bert Crittenden, and Mrs. John Waite,
will judge the costumes.
An important, feature of the party
will be the booth of the war work
committee of the league, where re-
freshments of all description will be
sold. The proceeds derived from the
sales will go into the war work fund
of the league.
Admission to the party will' be 10
cents for those in costume and 15
cents for spectators.
Purdue to Educate Wounded Soldiers
Purdue is one of the colleges which
are to aid in the education of return-
ed wounded oldiers. Some of the men
are to be assigned to special work by
the war department. Instruction is to,
be given by members of Purdue facul-
ty in government hospitals and also
at the hoaital for the blind in Balti-

Campus briefs

An important meeting of the junior
Lits will be held at 4 o'clock this
afternoon in room 203 University hall.
The society of Wyvern will enter-
tain with oa tea from 3:30 to 5:30
o'clock this afternoon at the Kappa
Kappa Gamma house. All junior girls
in the University are cordilly invited'
to attend.
Mr. Immel of the department of Or-
atory announces two story-hours for
next week. They will be at 4 o'clock
on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons.
All children and others interested in
story-telling are invited to attend.
Due to the unexpectedly large mem-
bership this year, the Union has ex-
hausted its stock of '18-'19 buttons.
A new supply has been ordered, but
the date of- arrival is uncertain.
Officers Clearing
Up S. AT.C. Post
Until all the expenses that were
incurred by the S. A. T. C. during its
stay in Ann Arbor are paid, Major
Ralph H. Durkee will remain here,
according to his statement yesterday,
as it is necessary for him to sign for
all the money that is to be paid out.
When he has settled all the affairs, he
will notify the district head at Chi-
cago that he is ready for discharge.
Major Durkee thinks that this will
not come about for at least two weeks.
There are still 15 honorable dis-I
charge blanks that have not been
turned in, one or two having come in
lately. Those that have not come in
are almost entirely from men who
are not in school.
The other officers who are still
here are Lieuts. G. I. Back, Leo R.
Walter, and E. J. Stotter. These men
will remain here until they are noti-
fied that their work has been satis-
factorily completed.
NEW UNION TO BE
SCENE OF SMOKER
Tickets are selling rapidly for the
annual all-medic smoker to be held
next Monday evening in the banquet
hall of the new Union. Numerous
committee members, appointed from
the different classes, have so canvass-
ed the Medical school that practically
every faculty member, intern, and
student is wearing one of the little
blue tags.
Considerable interest is being arous-
ed from the fact that this will be the
first student function of any impor-
tance to be held in the new Union
building.
The medic mixer marks enother evi-
dence of the return of the campus to
its normal pre-war condition. It is
the first smoker to be held on the cam-
pus this year by any other than a mil-
itary organization.
All of these factors, combined with
the statement from the committee in
charge that the program will be the
snappiest and most effective ever pre-
sented to a medic audience, are ex-
pected to produce a record turnout
from the northeast corner of the cam-
pus.
POLITICAL ISSUE
FEATURES REVIEW
- "The Theory of Popular Soyereign-
ty," by Harold J. Laski, of Harvard, is
one of a number of articles of popular
interest in the January Law Review

which came out yesterday.
Frederick Thulin, a Chicago lawyer
and a public accountant, has an ar-
ticle on "Domestic Corporate Tangible
and Intangible Property." In his con-
tribution, Mr. Thulin discusses a prob-
lem in connection with the present tax
law which has proved dificult to most
men of the legal profession.
In this issue Prof. Myron W. Walk-
ins, of Missouri, concludes a series of
three articles on federal corporation.
A section on "Recent Important De-
ci:on s," and f "Book Reviews," con-
clu des the number.
Johnson Calls Meeting of Junior Lits
Carl Johnson, president of the ju-
nior lits, 1a called a meeting of that
class to* be held at 4 o'clock Thurs-
day afternoon In room 203 University
hall. Plans for the J-Hop will be
discussed.

SENIOR ITS INFORMED
OF PRESENT RATING
REGISTRAR SENDS COMPLETEI
RECORDS OF ACADEMIC
WORK TO 400
Statements of the academic record
of the 400 seniors in the literary col-n
lege are now being sent out to themt
by Registrar Arthur G. Hall. Eachv
report contains the standing of thei
student up to Oct. 1, 1918, and includesh
the number of hours and points as
well as any deficiencies the studentn
may have in any of the groups. . t
"Because of the disturbed conditions
this year, the list of seniors is prob- a
ably not accurate," Registrar Haillt
said yesterday. Every senior who doest
not receive his report within the next
few days, is therefore asked to call at
the Registar's office and place hisd
name upon the list.
Those who are to graduate at thet
end of this semester, second semester,.
or summer session, should have theirn
names on this list. Although therea
are only about 400 on this tentativet
list, the number will be considerably
increased by the seniors who return
the second semester.
ORATORICAL CLUBS
TO ,HOLD CONTESTS
Plans are being formulated for an
extemporanious speaking contest tov
be held during the second semester,v
according to Mr. R. K. Immel, of theg
oratory department. The decision was
reached at a joint meeting of the Adel-t
phia House of Representatives and then
Athena Literary society last Tuesdayt
evening.-
An intramural oratorical contestI
was proposed at the meeting, the plant
of which is to arrange a series of
triangular contests between Alpha Nu,1
the Adelphi, and the Athena.-
The silver trophy cup, awarded toC
the winners of the debating contest,3
is now in the hands tf the Alpha Nu,
where it will remain, due to the dis-C
solution of the Webster and Jeffer-r
sonian debating clubs.
George True, '21, was appointedr
chairman of the Adelphia annual ban-N
quet committee. Speaker Hermane
August, '21L, will act as toastmaster.A
The speakers for the banquet will bei
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman, of the econo-
mics department, Mr. R. K. Immel of
t e oratorical department, Ralph M.
Carson, of the engineering English de-
partment, and Mr. Thomas E. Black,
of Detroit.
MICHIGAN'S UNIT
TO RETURN SOON1
"Michigan's Unit," is the title by
which American Base Hospital, No. 17,
is sometimes known. The unit, under -
the command of Col. Angus McLean,
was recruited in Detroit and many
Michigan men are in it. It is ex-
pected that its probable return within
th4 next month will bring many of1
these men back to University life.
Members of the unit who are 'Iich-
igan men are: Robert Breakey, ex-1
'20, son of Capt. J. F. Breakey, '94, a
medical officer in the unit; Henry
Lane, '17L; Victor Husted, ex-'19E;
Robert Tannahill, '15; Sherwood
Reekie, ex-'19; Frederick Lyon, ex-'19;
Crampton Finn, ex-19; Charles Horr,
ex-'19; Sherman Fitzsimons, ex-'19E;
Frank McVeigh, ex-'20E; Donald Mab-
ley, ex-'19; Melbourne Smallpage,
ex-'18.

Due to delayed orders the unit will
not sail until Feb. 1.
TAU BETA PI HOLDS BANQUET
IN HONOR OF 11 INITIATES
Eleven initiates of the Tau Beta
Pi, honorary Engineering fraternity,
were given their initiation banquet
last night in Foster's Tea Room. These
men were initiated Dec. 1.
Appearing on1 last evening's pro-
gram were:
Toastmaster ..............A. D. Moore
Faculty Representative ..........
..................Prof. J. C. Parker
For Actives ............E. L. Spanagel
For Initiates .............. D. G. Bovee
'16 Man to Investigate Casualty Lists
Lieut. Charles J. Frisbie, '16, in a
recent letter to Dean John R. Effinger,
stated that he was on his way to
Coblenz, Germany, to do some research
work in regard to the casualty lists.
The letter was sent from Luxembourg.

INSTRUCTOR COMPETES
FOR SPOTLIGHT FAME
FACULTY MAN AND MANY STU-
DENTS AT TRY OUTS FOR
VAUDEVILLE:
Faculty competed with students last
night in an effort to gain a place on1
the program of the Spotlight Vaude-
ville, slated for Feb. 28. A certain
instructor, prompted by a desire to
help the American University union:
in Paris, volunteered to furnish a
number, and it is thought probable
that his offer will be accepted.
As for the student talent present
at the tryouts, it was there in quan-
tity and quality. Making the selec-
tions will probably be the most dif-
ficult task of the chairman when the1
final tryout is held at 7 o'clock Mon-
day evening in the old Union.
At the preliminarytests last night
there were instrumentalists, vocalists,
impersonators, acrobats, hypnotists,i
magicians, dancers, and comedians-
an array which fully met the expec-
tations of those in charge.
POLISH VIOLINIST
TO PLAY SATURDAY
Numbering among the many fea-
tures in the Polish concert Saturday
night in the High School auditorium,
will be Mr. Jan Szulczewski, a young
violin virtuoso, graduate of the Chica-
go Conservatory of Music.
Mr. Szulczewski is an exponent of
the doctrine that he performer of the
music is of greater importance than
the music itself-that the music is
merely a medium through which the
performer may play upon the emo-
tions of his hearers.
Mr. Szulczewski, who has appeared
in a number of recitals in South Bend,
Ind., and Chicago, will render the Sec-
ond Polonaise Brillante. His sister,
Miss F. Szulczewski, a promising pian-
ist, also of the Chicago Conservatory
of Music, will present Sherzo B fiat
minor.
Miss Jeanette Kruszka, who will
render a Paderewski ballet and Schar-
wenka's dance, is. distinctly a Polish
dancer and not a Russian one as was
sated in the headline yesterday morn-
ing.
AUER'S PUPIL TO *
APPEAR ON FEB. 8
Another pupil of Leopold Auer's,
Toscha Seidel, Russian violinist, will
appear Saturday evening, Feb. 8, in
Hill auditorium at the fourth coicert
in the Choral union series.
Mr. Seidel is the last of the three
great, young violinists who created
such a sensation in America last sea-
son; the other two being Jascha
Heifetz and Max Rosen. The names
of these three have been linked to
gether as representing almost a new
development in violin playing. - All
three are Russians, all are practically
of the same age, 18, and all were
by the same master, Leopold Auer.,°.
Rosen was heard in Ann Arbor last
year. This year the public will have
the opoprtunity of hearing the second
member of the great trio.

Wire ulletins
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, Jan. 22.- The parliament
held a private session today. The of-
ficial report of the meeting says that
24 deputies were present. A tempor-
ary time minister was elected unan-
imously, and four other ministers,
nominated by the speaker, were ap-
proved by the parliament.
Washington,, Jan. 22.- Secretary
Baker today ,ordered the release of
110 consciencious objectors held at3
Fort Levenworth.
London, Jan. 22.-The Evening News
says it learns from authoritative Por-
tuguese sources that former King
Manuel is ready to return to Portugal
whenever the people wish him to re-
turn.
Paris, Jan. 22.-All the American of-
ficers and soldiers will get a chance
to see Paris on a leave of absence of
three days before sailing homeward,
according to a general order issued
from American headquarters. Amer-
ican soldiers of Italian, French, Bel-
gian, and British extraction will have
an opportunity to visit their former
homes or relatives before returning
to the United States.
Right This Way!
You Can't Lose
Violation of the Sherman anti-trust
law may be expected on the part of
members of the teams now carrying
on the Y. M. C. A. membership cam-
paign in this city. The violation,
however, will be involuntary, as the
citizens involved are not of their own
accord seeking to control the Easter
egg market.
The evidence in the case consists of
a pair of rabbits, of the species lepus
cuniculus, which were presented to
the .leading team at a luncheon held
yesterday at the city "Y." The pre-
sentation, however, contained -ele-
ments of progressiveness, for the
aforementioned leperes cuniculi are
not to remain in permanent posses-
sion of the present owners, but are
to be transferred to other teams which
pass the record mark.
This unfixed tenure causes no wor-
ry to yesterday's winners, for they
hope that the w, k, stork and the rab-
bits will effect an agreement before
the time of transfer arrives. No pro-
vision is made for the disposal of
the long-eared offspring, and it is ex-
pected that the judges will make
their decision according. to the prece-
dent of the hen which laid her eggs
in the neighbor's yard.
ESSAY CONTEST TO
REMAIN UNCHANGED
The prize essay contest, given un-
der the auspices of the Michigan his-
torical commission ,will not be alter-
ed in the least, according to a letter
received by President Hary B.
Hutchins from the Michigan histori-
cal commission.
"Applicants from the University of
Michigan should not have the impres-
sion that their efforts might be ren-
dered futile by the conclusion of the
peace conference in Paris," states the
letter. "The test is largely a matter
of how the material is handled."
The Michigan historical commission
has set aside the sum of $200 to be ex-
pended in four prizes of $50 each, to
four groups of competitors in educa-
tional institutions of Michigan ,for the

best essays on "The Essential Condi-
tions for Permanent World Peace."
Students in all of the Michigan col-
leges are eligible.
In order to enter this contest, ap-
plication must reach the secretary of
the commission at Lansing, on or be-
fore Feb. 1, 1919. Each %essay must
reach the secretary on or before April
30, 1919. Information regarding the
rules and conditions of the contest
may be obtained by writing to the
secretary at Lansing.
BEEG YOUR PARDON
Several names were misspelled in
Wednesday's report of the Triangle
initiation, due to the difficulty of get-
ting the story over the phone. The
initiates were Waldo Harbert, Clay-
ton Shoemaker, Hobart Smith, James
Darbaker, Joseph Tracy, William
Frazer, Waldo Schaeche, Kershaw
Harms; Harlan Walker, and Fran
Schwalde.

RSS-AEHICANS
WHIP BOLSHEVIK!
IN ZRO WEATHER
ALLIES WITHDRAW TO OLD LINES
UNDER PRESSURE OF
OFFENSIVE +
REDS FAIL TO KILL
U. S. MEN IN ATTACK
I:nemy Mobilizes Near Vilsk, Russia;
Plan Drive on Shenkursk Sector;
Forces Small
(By Associated Press)
-London, Jan. 22.-The five great
powers, Great Britain, France, the
United States, Italy, and Japan have
reached a definite agreement regard-
ing Russia, according t'o a Paris dis.
patch to the Central News today.
Archangel, Jan. 21 (delayed).-Bol-
shevik troops are heavily shelling the
farthest south positions of the Amer-
ican and Russian armies at Ust
'Padenga, on the Waga river, 30 miles
south of Shenkursk.
Bolsheviki Shelling Americans
They are showing considerable ac-
tivity west of Shenkursk on the Tan-
nia river. It has"been impossible to de-
termine whether the attack will de-
velop on a great scale. The enemy
has mobilized its forces in the vi-
cinity of Vilsk, and apparently is pre-
pared for a general offensive in the
8henkursk, sector. The weather is
1r degrees below zero.
Attack Repulsed with Heavy Losses
Sunday the enemy under cover of
heavy bombardment attacked with in-
fantry the American and Russian po-
sitions at Ust Padenga. The Allied
outpost withdrew, but the Bolshevik
attack on the main positions was re-
pulsed with heavy losses.
Allies Suffer No Casualties
Along the Murmansk railroad front,
the Russian and Allied troops yester-
day raided the village of Rugozerka,
50 miles southeast of Sorroka, where
they either killed or captured all of
the Bolshevik garrison. They took
110 rifles and other implements and
numerous documents. The Allied
forces did not suffer a sirigle cas-
ualty.
Plan Schedule for
Exam Conflicts.
Examinations in the literary col-
lege which cannot be held in accord-
ance with the regular examination
schedule without confi't, must be
taken at one of the following pe-
riods: First Monday, 2 to 5 o'clock;
first Thursday, 9 to 12 o'clock; first
Saturday, 2 to 5 o'clock; second Wed-
nesday, 2 to 5 o'clock; second Thurs-
day, 2 to 5 o'clock. The instructor
in charge of the class conflicting will
announce the time for its examina-
tion.
The committee on. elections will
meet from 3 to 5 o'clock daily, Jan.
21 to 24, in University hall auditor-
ium, and nt tin the registrar's office.
This change was occasioned by the
large number of freshman who are
unable to make elections in accord-
ance with the rules, because of the
irregular elections permitted the first
semester.
The classification committee will
meet at 5 o'clock daily in room 104
University hall the remainder of this

week and the first part of next week.
GOMBRIG, '18L, KILLED BY
NORTHWESTERN SATURDAY
Melvin R. Gombrig, '18L, was killed
last Saturday by a Northwstern train
t at Lake Forest, Ill. Gombrig, who
1 was a third class yeoman at Great
Lakes, was on his way to his home
in Chicago when the. accident occur-
red. Although no one witnessed his
death it is supposed that -he stepped
from a moving train directly in the
path of the Northwestern.
Gombrig was a member of Wool-
sack, honorary law society, while at
Michigan.
e
Former Medic Was German Prisoner
Capt. W. H. Gordon, '16M, who was
a a prisoner behind the German lines
v during almost the entire year of 1918,
z is now in Bordeaux awaiting his or-
ders to return home. 7 -

r } .

FACULTY MEN
EXTENSION

GIVE
TALKS

Six members of the faculty will go
to towns in this locality within the
week to deliver lectures on their reg-
ular extension courses. Prof. W. D.
Henderson will speak on Jan. 23, in
Detroit, on "Modern Science and the
Great War." He will also deliver an
address on the "Re-discovery of Amer-
ica" on Jan. 24 in Camden, and on
Jan. 26 in Milford.
Other professors who will leave this
week are as follows: Prof. C. 0. Dav-
is, who speaks today in Grant on
"Modern Tendencies in Education;"
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman, who will de-
liver his address on "Aspects of Gov-
ernment Ownership of Railroads" to-
day in Marshall; Prof. W. A. Frgyer,
who speaks on Jan. 24 in Wayne on
"Democracy in Russia;" Dr. A. S.
Warthin, who speaks on Jan. 24 in
Oxford on "Hygiene and Morality."
Prof. R. M. Wenley will deliver his
regular course in philosophy on Jan.
25 in Detroit.

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