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January 19, 1919 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, JANUARY 1

PNS FOR SUMMER
SCHOOL READY SOON
MAY BRING ENGLISH STUDENTS
TO TEACH IN COMING
SESSION
Summer session plans will be ready
when the students register for the
second semester, and the courses to
be offered, their tentative character
and list of professors in each depart-
ment, will be given in order to al-
low prospective summer school stu-
dents to map out their course for the
remainder ofrthe year, it was an-
nounced yesterday.
Chance to Make Up Work
By attending summer school, those
who were in the S. A. T. C. and naval
unit, -and those returned from train-
ing camps and abroad may catch up
with their classes. Freshmen can
shorten their residence to three yea'rs
by attending three summer school
sessions.
When the British mission was here
in the fall, the members expressed a
desire to have more intimate rela-
tions in regard to the universities of
the United States. The easiest ap-
proach to this would be through the
summer session they believed, and the
American University Union of Eu-
rope, through the London office, has
asked the summer session if they
would like to co-operate in placing
some British soldiers in the Univer-
sity. This is still merely a proba-
bility as nothing definite has been
done. The attitude of the American
University Union is expressed in the
following extract of a letter receiv-
ed recently by the Dean of the sum-
mer session:
British Scholars May Teach
"The interest in the promotion of
intellectual intercourse as a basis for
international good will is so strong
in GreatBritain at the present time
that numbers of British scholars
would be glad to consider' proposals
to teach in summer sessions of Amer-
ican universities both to bring to
America the ideas and policies of
Great Britain and to bring back home
a better understanding of American
ccnditions."
This proposal is being considered
by the administration of the summer
session, but whether plans to this ef-
feet for next summer session will ma-
terialize is unknown as yet.
Curate Takes Dr. Gardner's Place
Dr. Wm. E. Gardner, secretary of
the Episcopal general board of re-
ligious education, who was to preach
at the morning services of St. An-
drew's Episcopal church today, has
.become ill and unable to fulfill his
engagement. The subject will be
treated, however, by Rev. C. T. Webb,
curate of St. Andrew's church.

FRENCH CLUB IN
ANTI-WAR STATUS
The Cercle Francais will signalize
its complete return to normal activ-
ity by the opening of the annual lec-
ture series Wednesday afternoon.
Prof. Hugo Thieme, of the French
faculty, will deliver an address enti-
tled "La France et La Guerre." The
lecture will be given in Tappan hall
at 4 o'clock, and will be open to ac-,
tive and associate members of the
society.
Associate membership tickets will
be placed on sale Monday. As has
been customary, these tickets will en-
title the purchasers to admission to
all of the lectures and entertain-
ments given by the society during
the remainder of the school year. The
tickets will be sold at 50 cents.
. Initiation for newly-elected active
mebers will be held next week. With
the opening of the new semester,
work will begin on the production of
the annual French play.
POINCARE OPENS PEACE
CONGRESS BY FIERY TALK

have learned to admire him and those
of us who have beenaassociatedawith
him, havef acquired a genuine affec-
tion for him.
Delegates Work Together
"Moreover those of us who have
been in these recent days in con-
stant consultation with him know how
warmly his purpose is set towards
the goal of achievement through
which all our faces are turned. He
feels as we feel, as I have no doubt
everybody in this room feels, that we
are trusted to do a great thing, to
do it in the highest spirit of friend-
ship and determination, and to do it
as promptly as possible in order that
the hearts of men may have fear lift-
ed from them, and that they may re-
turn to those purposes of life which
will bring them happiness and con-
tentment and propriety.
"Knowing his brotherhood of heart
in these great matters, it affords me
a personal pleasure to propose that
M. Clemenceau shall be the perma-
nent chairman of this conference."
Iowa Wins Conference Game
Chicago, Jan. 18.--Iowa defeated
N rthwestern 29 to 28 tonight in the
last three minutes of play in a West-
ern Conference basketball game.

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.1

WHAT'S GOING ON

-I I

TODAY
9 o'clock- All-senior dance com-
mittee meets at the Michigan Union.
2:45 o'clock-Rabbi Felix Levi will
address the Jewish Students' congre-
gation in .Lane hall.
3 o'clock-Christian Science lecture
by Mr. Frank Bell, of Boston, at the
Whitney theater.
TOMORROW
4 o'clock-Soph lits meet at Univer-
sity hall.
5 o'clock- Meeting of prospective
tryouts for the Gargoyle business staff
in the Gargoyle rooms. Press build-
ing.
8 o'clock-Michigan-Indiana basket-
ball game in Waterman gymnasium.
U-NOTICES
lFresh lits will meet at 4 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon in University hall.
Students who wished to enter Latin
classes last fall, but were prevented
by war conditions, should consult
Professor Crittenden, room 103, Uni-
versity hall, at 3 to 4 o'clocktontTues-
day and Thursday, in- order that suit-
able courses may be arranged.
Bolsheviki Occupy Mitau
London, Jan. 18.-Mitau, the capi-
tal of Courland, has been occupied by
the Bolsheviki according to a German
wireless dispatch received here. The
Germans were obliged to leave behind
numerous guns and ammunition.

;'

Ask your doctor about the value of local heat in treating
most diseases. He will tell you that constant soothing heat is

often just as valuable as medicines.-

(Continued from Page One)
a conference before. The fortunes
of all peoples are involved. A great
war is, ended, which seemed about to
bring a universal cataclysm. The dan-
ger is past. A victory has been won
for mankind and it is delightful that
we should be able to record these
great results in this place.
"It is more delightful to honor
France because we can honor her
in the person of so distinguished a
servant. We have all felt in our par-
ticipations in the struggle of this war
the fine steadfastness which charac-
terized the leadership of the French
in the hands of M. Clemenceau. We

Our grandmothers used the flaxseed, mustard and onion
poultice, but in these days we demand a heater that does not3
cool off-that does not make us run up and down stairs to be
heated--that is not mussy or wet-that can be controlled right
where you are.
The ELECTRIC HEATING PAD meets all these de-
mands and is a great aid in curing ailments of all kinds.
Come in and let us show you.
THE DETROIT EDISON COMPANY

The Daily at your door every morn-
ing, $2.50 until June.-Adv.
Those who advertise in The Mich-
igan Daily cater to ALL Michigan
students.-Adv.
Students read The Daily.-Adv.

L

WILLIAM AND MAIN STREETS

We hake a felv of our very best trimmed hats left which we
hi dispose of at a great sacrifice to make room for our
Spring Stock.
STEVENS & PERSHING, 618 Packard

Ann Arbor, Mich.

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I F. ii

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SPEAKING

OF INSURANCE

The best insurance is the insurance that you
will be healthy and live long.
Why not tack on a few years by eating at
the CAFETERIA where you can select food
adapted to your needs from a great variety
properly prepared from the best material.

I

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CLOTHING
There's a smart, well set up look about
our suits and QvergOats. Underneath this
look is the quality of good materials and
fine workmanship.

Why are you
so insistant?

I.

GO TO

Comfortable, good fitting and very
highly tailored suits are our specialty.

the Mayer-Schairer

Company
112 S. Main St.

BECAUSE

I

These clothes are sold at prices that
help you meet the cost of living. They
offer real serviceability'and real economy

I

FOR

at no sacrifice of style.

Besimers' Beefsteak Dinners

Fine Stationery
Engraved Cards
Die Stamping
Printing
Ruling
Book Binding
Leather Goods
Office Supplies
Filing Devices
Desks

are so hard to equal

You will like them.

The man who

sells them likes them. See them today!

G. H. Wild Company

,I

s

FREDDiE BESIMERS

Leading Merchant Tailors.

State Street

f

-l

Chairs

Book Cases

113 W. Huron St.

'

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F

Roller

Skating,

Tues.,

Thurs.,

Sat.

Nights

7

to

10

Saturday and Sunday p. m., 2 to 5

0

IBERG COLISEUM

725 S. 5th Ave. Phoi

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