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January 15, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

, - THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAG1

Cupid Hits Mark
at Martha Cook
Nupitals are going can apace at
Martha Cook building., Within the last
two days two marriages have been an-
nounced.
Beatrice Bowbeir, '21, announced,
the fact Monday that she was married
secretly at Jackson Un Nov. 20 to Le-
land Walker, who is serving in the
navy. The couple left yesterday forj
his home in Gobelville, Mich.
Gladys Vinter, '20, announced yester-
day that she was married Sunday
night to Lieut. Stanley Schultz, ex-'18,
of Western Reserve college. He left
the next day for Middleton, Pa., where
he is stationed at present. He is a
member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon
fraternity and she is a member of the
Pi Beta Phi sorority. Miss Vinter
will continue school this year.
Use the Daily to reach the students.
Four thousand students read it everyI
morning.-Adv.

FOR LIBERTY
The following casualties are report-
ed today by the commanding general
of the American Expeditionary Forc-.
es: Died of wounds, 42; died from dis-
ease, 94; wounded severely, 176. Total,
312.
GERMAN UPRISINGS PART
OF RUSS BOLSHEVIK PLANS
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 14.-Officials here
were much interested yesterday in an
article in the Berlin Tatliscat Rund-
schau of Saturday, stating that the
Spartacan groups had sent a tele-
gram to Moscow that fighting must
be stopped as soon as possible, be-
cause the Berlin working classes
were not ripe for dictatorship of the
proletariat. This, it was pointed out,
supports the charge that has often
been made, that the German upris-
ing has been directed by the Russian
Bolsheviks.
Always-Daily service-Always.

Medical Students
you need
LABORATORY SUPPLIES
and-------- ar
SURGICAL INSTFLUMENTS
We have them; of the best quality, and at the right prices
Let's get acquaintevj
The Goodyear Drug Co.
107 So. Main Street Ann. Arbor, Michigan

Calkins
Drug
Co.

'SUMMER SCHOOL PLAhNS
ESPEC1ILLY PROMISING
MANY VOCATIONAL COURSES OF-
FERED TO EX-SOLDIERS'
WHO RETURN
Prospects for summer school have
never been so bright, according to
Dean Edward H. Kraus. The summer
session this year will be conducted
on a <larger scale, as the war has
brought out the value of a University
training, and a business depression is
always followed by an increased at-
tendance. This will be true this sum-
mer especially, when so many will be
unable to find employment.
The list of subjects will be ready
when the students register in February
for the second semester, so that they
may see how to arrang their courses
if they intend to- remain during the
summer. There will be a delay in
getting out the announcements this
year, but they will be ready about
'March 10.
Summer school in all colleges, ex-
cepting the Law and Medical schools,
will begin June -30, and continue for
eight weeks. In the Medical school
the session will last only six weeks.
while in the Law school it will begin
a week earlier and last ten weeks.
Many students who were in the S. A.
T. C. have already definitely planned
to attend, and a large enrollment of
those who have been at camps or in
actual fighting is expected. It will be
possible for the latter to male up the
first semester's work during the sec-
ond semester and summer school.
The summer session is made ex-
tremely attractive by a program of
special lectures, entertainments, con-
certs, and educational moving pic-
tures. Every afternoon at 5 o'clock
and every evening there are lectures
or timely subjects, sometimes by
members of the faculty, and sometimes
by well known speakers from outside.
Last summer a number of distinguish-
ed foreigners spoke. The faculty con-
certs in Hill auditorium will be con-
tinued throughout the summer, but
will be held on Wednesday afternoons
as was customary before. Open air
j performances are given every sum-
t mer. Negotiations have already been
made with Ben Greet, who is to return
to this country, and plays supervised
by him will be offered in the open air
theater yearly erected on the campus.
An effort is being made to strength-
en the work on account of the fact
that an increased attendance is ex-
pected, and to meet the needs of those
who were in the service. Because
there has been a dearth of teachers
there will be more edlcation courses
offered. This work for prospective
teachers will be greatly amplified, and
will include a course in industrial edu-
cation under Prof. George N. Meyers.
The library instruction may possibly
be held in the new Library, although
this has not been definitely arranged.
The course for high school librariahns
will be repeated. By taking this sum-
mer library course a student may com-
mand a position without further in-
struction or experience. The biolog-
ical station on Douglas Lake will be
conducted as usual this summer, un-
der the direction of Prof. George R.
LaRue. Among other special courses
is a course in embalming which leads
to an embalmer's license. Italian will
be resumed, and Russian also will be
given. In all, there will be 300 cours-
e v, and a teaching staff of 200, com-
pos'ed, for the greater part, of those
nomOv on the Michigan faculty.

SOLDIERS NUMBERING 65,000
.EADY FOR JOURNEY HOME
About 65,000 boys have arrived at
the depoi'tation camp near Brest. They
are prepaed for their trip home in
"tip-top" shape. No more "cooties"
for them. ,The uniforms are all in the
very best condition before the boys
ed 1w ito lPV nnd a_1 of theP

Face Chap?

I

I

A Pied Galley
When you go into a slum joint (and
you DO know what I mean, don't
you?), and you order a steak and after
a long smokey interval the thing is
brought in and shoved before you and
it looks good and\smells good and to
all outward and visible appearances
IS good-so you start to eat it and
Just Then, someone closely related to
the nefarious joint-mebbe its grand-
daughter or its neice-comes in and
staring stretch-eyed at your descend-
ing knife, scares herself by cackling,
"0, you eating THAT?" and when you
look a whole paragraph of interroga-
tion points at her, she says, "I won't
tell you now that you've started eat-
ing it-," well, it's a quirky sensation,
isn't it?
Imagination Somewhere, Anyway-
The Daily Cardinal of Wisconsin,
prints the following: Dean Nardin is
preparing an autobiography entitled,
"My Spotless Childhoow." Watson
have you a spotless childhoow? Be
honest, now, Wisconsin, do you know
what a childhoow is? -B. E. S.
Open Your Mouth and Put Your
Feet In
Have you tried the new game that
is ripping up the campus? It can be
played by groups of any size or like
solitiare. It's name is "Offuls."
An "offul" is the saying or doing of
the most horrible thing possible. For
example, if President Hutchins should
pass you on State street and you
should shout "Hello Harry," that
would be an "Offul," and would score
something like a royal flush.
There is but one warning to the
players of this game and that is that
old advice about "Temperance in all
things"-you know the theory that
Omar Khayyam and Mr. Bonaparte of
Corsica spent their time exploiting
and exploding. This sport should not
be carried into excess-into disipa-
tion as it were. Perhaps you heard
about the strong man who was carried
shrieking out of one of our churches?
Just as the minister started to pray,
the harrassed soul with his figure a
la Herc. imagined himself asking in a
bored tone "Whattin do you think
you're doing?" .... Well,just so.
The new pastime originated among
the women, but was rapidly taken up
by the men. It's spread has been phe-
nominal; it's chief followers being
laws and P. G.'s. Try it.
It Is Is It Isn't It
Student (translating) : "Was it?"
Prof.: "Is it was it?"
Student: "Isn't it was it?"
Prof.: "No, it isn't was it, it is is
it?"
Student, "Oh, it is is it?"
FORMER FOOTBALL STAR
STAYS ONLY TWO DAYS
Ensign Ward C. Culver, '20, of for-
mer football fame was in Ann Arbor
yesterday and the day before. En-
sigh Culver has= made two trips
acros and is about to start out on a
third. His ship, the U. S. S. Louisiana,
is a cruiser transport. It will carry
a load of relief workers on the trip
over and bring back soldiers, ma-
rines and sailors.
Followers of football are in high
hopes that Culver will return for next
year's football season.
BOYS IN SERVICE TO RECEIVE
FREE Y. M. C. A. MEMBERSHIP
Washtenaw county men who have

been in the service either in this
country or abroad will be taken into
the city Y .M. C. A. as members for
three months as soon as they return
to their homes. About 300 of the
county's boys are eligible to the free
membership to the local organization.
This is a national move for the Y. M.
C. A. and the plan will be followed in
every city in which a Y is located.
Michigan Union Continues Dances
Union membership dances will be
held this week .on Friday and Satur-
day nights. The Friday night dance
will be from 9 to 1 o'clock, and on Sat-
urday from 9 to 12 o'clock.
The new Union dance hall will hard-
ly be ready before May as there is a
great deal of cabinet work to be done
and other finishing touches to be
made. It is probable that it will be
ready for dances before this academic
year is over.
Two University Girls Receive Degrees
Miss Lois Devereaux, '20, and Miss
Kennetha Berry, '19, received the de-
grees of Bachelor of Arts at Christ-
mas time and have left school. Miss
Devereaux has gone to Detroit, where
she is taking a course in Occupa-
tional Therapy at Newberry House,
and Miss Berry has entered the school
of Civics and Philanthropy at Chica-
go. Both are members of the Alpha

Mentho-Salis Shaving Lotion
will prevent it

Soothing, Healing and'

delightful to use
3,5c

. 0

324 SO. STATE STREET
1123 SO. UNIVERSITY AVE.
711 PACKARD STREET

_ iffilnnlri i R . Pi E A t t RL tr t tir t i ttiu
MRS. PEARL .

FLAN DERS
OR
LOWERS
PHONEI294
213 E. LIBERTY ST.

I.

Illlitliltt1i11f111 I1111t IHL1 lIU111t11111111t1t1 111t1I1ti1t1 '"

Leave Copy
at A
Quarry's ,and
The Delta

I

LAS I FI E
4DVERTISu.NG

Leave Copy
at
Students"
Supply Stors

I

LOST

OST-Dec. 21, Psi Upsilon fratern-
ity pin. Name on back. F. L. Wor-
cester. Call 63.
OST-A pair of light tortoise shell-
rimmed glasses in black case. Phone
2325.
OST-One man's glove, gray lined.
Phone 1031.

WANTED
WANTED-- singers: contra'to, bari-
tone, tenor, for church qu'.art et. Ap-
ply to Mrs. Gace Konold at the
University School of Music- ort Tues-
day or Thursday at 3I' P; .
FOR-SALE
FOR SALE- Three adjacent: tickets
for Bonnet concert, 3rd ro iw, first
balcony. H. Levinson, 434 A aynard.
283-R.
FOR SALE-The Daily can s( fi any-
thing-it is our specialty. It days

are ailowei to eve an alU&Le
boys are thoroughly disinfected. Al-
though the men from the hospitals
have been exposed to severe trials,
they will be home in excellent condi-
tiori within a few weeks.
Dr. Fletcher, Noted Dietician, Dead
Cooenhagen, Jan. 14. - Dr. Horace
Fletchier, world famous as a dietician,
died .here Monday from bronchitis,
after a long illness. Mr. Fletcher
was born in Lawrence, Mass., August
10, 1849. He received his education
at Dartmouth college and since his
graduation has been traveler, author
-and lecturer. He experimented in the
laboratories of Cambridge and Yale
-universities and was the originator of
-the system of mastication called
''Fletcherism." During the war he
-was a food economist for the commis-
I ision for relief in Belgium.
Use the Daily to reach the students.
Funr thousand students read it every

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