100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 10, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COOLER
_ODr

M kit b

aili

ASSOCIATED
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SiEJNTICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 72. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

GERMANY FILS
TO OBEY TERMS
OF ARMISTICE
HOOVER AND DAVIS REPRESENT
U. S. AT WAR COUNCIL
MEETINGS
FOUR NATIONS SEND
TWO ENVOYS TO PARIS
Allies Send Food to Vienna; Commis-
sions Afford Relief to Serbia
and Rumania
(By Associated Press)
London, Jan. 9.-Germany has
fallen behind during the last;
month in turning over munitions
according to the terms of, the
armistipee. A checking today
shows a shortage of 685 heavy
guns, 7,000 machine guns, 1,000
trench mortars, 600 airplanes,
4,736 engines, 5,000 motor lorries,
and 130,00 railway ears.
Paris, Jan. 9.-The meeting of the
srupreme war council, which had been
set for the-end of this week, proba-
bly will be deferred for a few days
because of the absence of some of the
principal members,
Among those with whom President
Wilson conferred today were \ Pre-
mier Orlando, of Italy, who has Just
arrived at Paris, and Baron Sonnino,
the Italian foreign minister.
Conferences Contine Meetings
The conferences, at which Secre-
tary of State Lansing, Colonel House
and Lord Robert Cecil are engaged,
concerned the league of nations,
were continued.
London, Jan .9. - The associated
governments have decided to estab-
lish a supreme war council consist-
ing of two representatives each from
France, Italy, the United States, and
Great Britain, according to an official
statement tonight to deal with the
questions of food, finance and ship-
ping resources with relations to re-
building and supplying liberated and
enemy territory, and to co-ordinate its
work for that done with Allied and
neutral countres.
Hoover and Davis Represent U. S.
At the request of the-war depart-
ment the Earl of beading and Sir
John Beale will, for the time being,
represent Great Britain. They will
start for Paris immediately. Herbert
Charlesr Hoover and Norman Davis
will represent the United States and
Etienne Clementel, the French minis-
ter of commerce, and Monsieur Vil-
train, France.
"Certain emergency measures, the
outcome of informal discussions, are
already affording relief to Serbia and
Rumania," the statement says. "Con-
cerning Austria and Germany the in-
ter-Allied commission has been work-
ing for some time and has already
visited Vienna and Prague. The food
situation in these territories is seri-
ous and is rendered more serious by
transport difficulties.
Allies Send Food to Vienna
"Meanwhile, arrangements are be-
ing made for the supply of a certain
quantity of food stuff, and some sup-
plies already have been sent to Vi-
enna. But further action will be re-

quired when the commission reports
to the supreme council."
LEUIT. CLAPP. '16,
GETS WAR CROSS
First Lieut. Kenneth S. Clapp, avid-
tLion, 16, has been awarded the Amer-
ican. War Cross for bringing down a
number of enemy planes. Lieutenant
Clapp enlisted early in the war in'
the British Royal Flying Corps and
received his commission at Fort:
Worth, Texas, after he transferred to
the American Aviation. While in
school, Lieutenant Clapp was a mem-
ber of Delta Tau Delta fraternity,
Univ. of Neb, Give Formals
Pan-Hellenic at the University, of
Nebraska has decided that formal par-
ties may be held by the fraternitiesl
this year. The cost of the parties is1

Old Time ixer
to Warm Boards
In order to increase the fund for
the University Women's war chest in
France, an All-campus mixer will be
given from 2:30 to 5 o'clock Satur-
day afternoon in Barbour gymna-
sium.
The proceeds of the dance are to
be added to the $50 already laid aside
by the Athletic association and sent
to Miss Alice Evans, former women's
gymnasium instructor, who is doing
orthopedic work in France. The fund
is to be used to help women who are
doing war work there.
Ike Fischer will furnish a four
piece orchestra. An unusually large
crowd is anticipated and a spirited
pre-war mixer will replace the rather
pepless atmosphere of war time
dances.
The following chaperones will be
present: Professor and Mrs. W. R.
Humphreys, Mr. and Mrs. A. E.
Wood, Miss Lucy Elliott, Miss Marion
Wood, Miss Marion Dawley, Lieuten-
ant and Mrs. J. Hayden.
BANNE LUMNI WEEK
EXPECTED THIS JUNE
NEW MICHIGAN UNION TO BE
CENTER OF ACTIVITY OF
REU4ION
Indications are that the ^lass re-
unions of June, 1919, will be larger
and more successful than those for
the past two. years Due to the war
and the resulting depression in all
conventions and reunions, the com-
mencement week of 1918 and 1917 fell
far short of previous years,
Plans for 75th Reunion Made
The Alumni association is making
plans for the 75th annual reunion at
which the classes of '64, '65, '66, '67,
'83, '84, '85, '86, '02, '03, '04, '05, will
be repiesented. It is expected that
over 2,000 alumni will return to
participate in the exercises of com-
mencement week. Several facts give
promise of a greater attendance than
former years, the most important of
which is the re-establishment of pre-
war customs and the return of men
in service.
The Michigan Union with its com-
pleted clubhouse will be the hub of
the activities and will probably prove
to be an inducement for a great many
of the alumni to return. The Union
sleeping quarters will accommodate
52 men ,and its club rooms will be
at the disposal of the former students.
The alumnae may be accommodated
at Martha Cook~ and Newberry res-
dences.
Usual Program Planned
An appeal will be made by the sec-
retary of the Alumni association in
the February issue of the Michigan
Alumnus to all graduates to estab-
lish class plans for the week in June.
The general exercises will'follow
customs of former years Alumni
week will open on the Monday pre-
ceding commencement, when the grad-
uates will register and have class
exercises Tuesday is reunion day
with exercises of the different col-
leges, Senior promenade, the SenQ
Girls play and a student entertain-
ment in Hill auditorium.
Alumni day on Wednesday offers a
luncheon, mass meeting and Senate
reception, and a concert on thersam-
pus. Commencement on Thursday

ends the week's activities and the re-
union,
INJURED FREMAN RECOVERING
FROM BAD FAI WEDNESDAY
Henry McLaren who was thought
to have been seriously injured in the
fire which completely gutted the aig-
ma Phi Epsilon house early Wednes-
day morning is reported as doing well'
asnd it is expected he will be able to
leave the hospital within a week. Mc-
Laren fell through the second dloor
:> he first and firemen who rescued
hll say he had a miraculous escape.
'I he headquarters of the fraternity
has been moved to 432 Thompson
street. Members have not yet been
called together to decide what will be
done about secilng permanent rooms.
Luckily only a small portion of the
furniture had been moved in the day
before. The loss of furniture amounts
to $600.

NORTHERN ORATOICAL
CONTEST TO BE HELD
OTHER CONTESTS CANCELLED
THIS YEAR; PRIZES TO BE
GIVEN
The only intercollegiate oratory or
speaking contest of any kind which
the University intends to enter into
this year is the Northern League Ora-
torical contest, according to Mr F.
K. Immel, of the oratory department.
The intercollegiate debates of the
midwest league which are usually
held between Michigan, Illinois and
Wisconsin universities, have been
given up owing to the refusal of Illi-
nois university to take part. The
central league debates which have
been held annually up to date will not
be held this year.
Speeches to Be in February 15
The Northern League of Oratory
which is conducting the contest con-
sists of several of the colleges and
universities of the north and west.
These are, Northwestern, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Oberlin,
and Michigan. The contest, which is
open to all students of the Univer-
sity with the exception of Freshmen,
has already started. The orators must
write their speeches before Febru-
ary 15 and send in one copy to the de-
partment of oratory. There may be
any subject chosen and the words
must not exceed 1,850 In number.
Finals to Be Held May 2
The delivering of the speeches here
will take place about the first of
March. Two Seniors, two juniors and
one sophomore will be picked. The
best one of these speeches will be de-
livered at the final contest, which is
to be heW at Northwestern university
on Friday, May 2. This contest never
fails to excite a great deal of interest,
but the interest should be even great-
er this year as it is the only inter-
collegiate oratorical contest of any
kind which the University is holding.
Attractive Prizes Offered
The winner of this contest in the
University receives the Kaufman tes-
timonial of $100 and the Chicago Alu-
ni medal. The second man in the
University gets the Kaufman testimo-
nial of $50. The Lowden testimonials
of $100 and of $50 are the prizes in
the final contest.
G. O P.'S TO NAME
PARTY CANDIDATES
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Jan. 9.-Party leaders from
every state arrived here today to at-
tend the meeting of the Republican
National committee meeting to be
held here tomorrow. The session will
discussthe 1920 presdential cam-
paign plans,
Former Chairman William Hays
declared that any discussion of can-
didates for president was premature.
The party leaders in informal confer-
ences tonight discussed probable can-
didates and issues. Among the 'names
mentioned in the gossip were:
"General Pershing; General Wood;
Senator Lodge, of Massachusetts;
Senator Cummings, of Iowa; Senator
Knox, of Pennsylvania; Senator
Harding, of Ohio; William H. Taft;
Senator Watson, of Indiana; Governor
Lowden, of Illinois; former Governor
Whitman, of New York; and former
Senator Weeks, of Massachusetts.
Governor-elect Henry Allen, of Kan-

sas, was mentioned as a possible can-
didate for vice-president by his
friends,"
ORCHESTRA TO BE
REO GANIZED SOON
Mr. Samuel Pierson Lockwood is
reorganizing the University Sympho-
ny orchestra. During the past fall
the. orchestra had to cease activities
on account of sterner duties, but will
resume rehearsals at 2:30 o'clock
Sunday, Jan. 19, at the School of
Musie.
Tryouts will be held at 7 o'clock
next Wednesday and Thursday even-
ings at the school. Candidates should
bring some music with which they
are familiar as sight reading is not
considered of greatest importance in
the tests.
Membership is not confined to
students. Anyone who is sufficiently
advanced may try out.

SINN FEIN FORMULTE
IRISH CONSTITUTION
ORGANIZATION PLANS "TO RlEN-
DER IMPOTENT POWER OF
ENGLAND"
(By Associated Press)
London, Jan. 9.-The first publica-
tion of what purports to be a Sinn-
Fein constitution for Ireland was
printed by the Globe. This has a pe-
culiar interest in view of the Sinn-
Fein proposal to hold an Irish con-
gress in the near future.
The 'article then set forth the Sinn-
Fein aims at securing an international
recognition for Ireland as an inde-
pendent republic and declares that
having achieved that status, the Irish
people by a referendum may freely
choose their ownform of govern-
ment. It says that the Sinn-Fein or-
ganization shall "in the name of the
Irish people deny the right and op-
pose the will of the British parlia-
ment and the British crown or any
foreign government to legislate for
Ireland."
It also says that the organization
will "make use of any and every
means available to render impotent
the power of England to hold Ireland
in subjection by military force or
otherwise."
The purported constitution declares
that a constituent assembly shall be
convoked to formulate measures for
the welfare of the people.
NOTED EDUCATORS
TO SPEAK AT YPSI.
Ypsilanti, Jan. 9.-An imposing ar-
ray of speakers has been secured for
a mid-year educational conference to
be held at the Michigan State Nor-
mal college on January 30 and 31
and February 1. An invitation is is-
sued by the Normal to all the edu-
cators of the state to attend. Because
of the state wide ban placed upon
public meetings at the time of the in-
fluenza epidemic no State Teachers'
meeting was held this year and the
Normal faculty feels that owing to
this fact, the conference will be well
attended .
Among those who will deliver ad-
dresses are Dr. William C. Bagley of
the Carnegie Foundation; Dr. S.
Parkes Cadman of the Central Con-
gregational church of Brooklyn, N.
Y., and Dr. Franklyn H. Giddings,
professor of Sociology at Columbia
university.
Specialtconferences of teachers of
physical education, of music and
household economics have been ar-
ranged. Professor Frederick Alexan-
der of the Normal college faculty will
have charge of the music.
BILL DEMANDS MORE
GRAMMAR SCHOOL
Detroit, Jan. 10.-A bill giving con-
tinuation work to all children up to
the age of 18 who are compelled to
enter employment before graduation
from high school will be brought up
at the next session of the state legis-
lature, according to Dr. Charles E'.
Chadsey, superintendent of public
schools.
Under the present ruling, children
under 16 are required to attend

school. Should the new bill pass
about 20,000 children of Detroit would
be affected by it.
"Our idea in extending the age lm-
it for continuation work is to give
the children who must work as good
an education as possible." says Dr.
Chadsey. The plans are to make the
educational training as far as possible
along general lines so that the pupil
may select for study those subjects
which he feels he needs most in the
vocation he has chosen. Enough va-
riety of subjects will be provided so
that all who wish to take advantage
of a general education may do so.
Kaiser Now Able to Walk
Amerongen, Jan. 7 (delayed). -
William Hohenzollern was able to
walk about in the gardens at Amer-
ongen castle for the first time in sev-
eral weeks. His health is reported
to be almost normal again.

Univrsity not to
Provide Tutors
The University will make no ar-
rangements to assist through the help
of special instructors, the students
who are now returning to the Univer-
sity or who have fallen behind in their
work.
Though the University is doing all
it possibly can to help the students
make up back work, it does not believe
that the plan of special instructors
paid by the University is advisable.
However, it will favor any attempt on
the part of the student to secure out-
side instruction.
In former years a student 'who,
through sickness or other causes, was
absent from many of his classes usu-
ally secured an instructor to tutor him
and thus make up the work missed.,
Although- the University does not of-
ficially back such tutorage, it does
approve of it providing that th.e ab-
sences were inevitable.
S. A. T. . SOON TO BE
A THING OF THE PST
HEADQUARTERS VACATED TODAY;
MOVED INTO UNION BUILD-
ING
The closing of the S. A. T. C. post in
Ann Arbor is drawing nearer every
day and is only postponed by the fact
that a few odds and ends are yet to
be cleaned up. Major Ralph H. Durkee
is still busy paying bills contracted
by the S. A. T. C. and getting in the
discharges, several more of which.
were received yesterday in time for
the men to receive their pay in Ann
Arbor. In the future all pay checks
will be referred to the quartermaster
at Chicago. Lieut. E. J. Stotter will
remain until he has checked up all the
equipment that was used here and
shipped it to the quartermaster's sup-
ply depot in Chicago. Lieut. G. I.
Back who has been in charge of the
signal corps work of the unit will be
here until he has transferred' all of
the stores and equipment to one of the
permanent signal corps bases.
The Sigma Chi house which has
been used as the headquarters for
both the army and the navy will be
completely vacated today when the
last of the army men move out. The
officers and sergeants who are here
yet are to have their quarters on the
third floor of the new Union building.
Major Durkee who has been using one
of the offices on the first floor of the
building will also move up to the third
floor.
-Doe May Instructs
Frosh Burglars
The casual observer looking over
Waterman gym which is once more
coming into its own after serving as
a barracks for several months will no
doubt be astonished to see Doc May
instructing what looks to be a class
of Jimmie Valentines in the art of
safe breaking. On questioning Doc
will explain that they are merely
Freshman trying to learn the combi-
nations of the lockers in which they
will keep their clothes and pots dur-
ing gymnasium work, which is to
start soon and in which the S. A. T.
C. and naval unit men can keep those
towels we have noticed them carry-
ing across the campus Saturday aft-

ernoons since school began.
CHINESE STUDENT DIES OF
PNEUMONIA AT HOSPITAL HERE
Lina Tsai, '20, Chinese student, died
Dec. 28 at the University hospital of
pneumonia following influenza. Pri-
vate funeral services were held at
Dolph's chapel and the burial was in
Forest Hill cemetery, Rev. A. W.
Stalker officiating.
Miss Tsai's home was in Kiu Kaing,
China, where her father and mother,
Rev. and Mrs. Tsai, live. Gerald
Tsai, '22E, also survives her.
She had been in this country for
two years, having attended school in
Warrentdwn, Missouri, previous to
coming to Ann Arbor last fall. Miss
Tsai was an exceptional) bright stu-
dent. She was preparing to enter the
medical school in order to help her
aunt, Ida Kahn, '98M, in her hospital
in China.

BEHLNIN SEIGE.
HUNS TAKETOWNS
FROM POLISH ARMY:-
SPARTACANS START RIOTS IN
FIVE TEUTON TOWNS; LOSE
FIGHTS
ALLIES WARN TURKS
TO LAY DOWN ARMS
Capital of Empire Scene of Bloody
Combats; Mob Storms the
Munich Bank
(By Associated Press)
Amsterdam, Jan. 9. - A state
seige has been proclaimed in
Berlin, according to a late dis-
patch from that city. (The
proclamation was probably made
by the Ebert government.)
Amsterdam, Jan. 9.-German forces
have r'ecaptured the important rail-
way junction of Bentschen from the
Poles, according to a dispatch from
Posen. The Berlin government has
issued a stirring call for a volunteer
army to repel the Polish invasion.
(An Amsterdam dispath Wednes-
day reported that the Poles had oc-
cupied most of Bentschen, but that
the Germans held the railway sta-
tion. The Poles are said to have
been repulsed in an attempt to cap-
ture the station.)
London, Jan. 9.-The Allies have
notified Turkey that unless the Turk-
ish army at Nedina lays down its
arms immediately the forts at the
Dardenelles will be destroyed.
Copenhagen, Jan. 9. - Governnent
troops have occupied all of the pub-
lic buildings in Berlin and thousands
of government troops are still enter-
ing the capital.
Spartacans Lose Fight
The Berlin correspondent of the
Berlingske Tidende, who sends . this
information, declares that the Sparta-
cans have been beaten and that quiet
was partly restored today.
Serious Spartacus riots are going
on at Dresden, Brunswick, Dessel-
dorf, Essen, and Rortmund, according
to the Munich correspondent of the
Politiken. Several towns in the Ruhr
district are in the hands of the
Spartacens.
Bloody Fighting in Berlin
Bloody fighting occurred at the
Anhalt railway station in Berlin
Wednesday night when Spartacan
groups tried to occupy the building.
They were repulsed. by government
troops who inflicted heavy losses on
them.
' Mob Storms Munich Bank
During the rioting in Munich on
Tuesday a mob of several thousand
persons attempted to storm one of
the largest banks, but was repulsed
by machine guns. The riots, a dis-
patch states, were promoted by the
Spartacans.
WOUND RESULTS IN
AMPUTATED FOOT
First Lieut. Clark B. Potter, 1506
Broadway, Ann Arbor, special engin-
eering student in the University in
1915-16, has had his right foot amput-
ated on account of infection from a

wound received at Chateau Thierry,
Aug. 4. Lieutenant Potter has been
commended highly by superior officers
for unusual bravery in leading his'/
men in the charge at Chateau Thierry.
He is recovering rapidly and is ex-
pected home on the next ship.
Lieutenant Potter, company E of
the 32nd division, enlisted in the ser-
vice during the Mexican war. He has
been stationed at Camp McArthur at
Waco, Texas, for some weeks before
leaving for France in January, 1918.
He had in his command four officers
and 60 men and had been in other
engagements but received his first ser-
ious w'ound at Chateau Thierry.
Hun Caught with Fake Passport
San Francisco, Jan. 9.-Baron Al-
lardt von dem B. Munch, nephew of
the former German ambassador,
Count von Bernstoff, was sentenced
to three months in the county jail for
perpetrating a fraud upon the gov-
ernment by attempting to enter the
country with a forged passport.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan