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January 09, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-09

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0

THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW
FLURRIES TODAY

Akw AOF
4 9
.A4tr tA an

Iatll

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 71.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1919.

M

EASTERN DIRECTOR
SECUREDFOR1010
MICHIGAN. OPERA
E. SCHUTER TO HAVE CHARGE
OF PRODUCING THIS YEAR'S
PLAY
GOOD MUSICAL NUMBERS
EXPECTED FROM ST A FF
Popular Dancer May Be Engaged lto
Drill Principals and Chorus in
Latest Steps
Fourteen years' professional ex-
perience including the direction of
"The Pink Lady" and "The Little
Cafe" is the record of E. Mortimer
Schuter of New York who has con-
tracted to direct the 1919 Union
opera. Of late years he has been
associated with Charles E. Dillingham
in "Chu Chin Chow" and others of
his musical comedy successes. The
Union has secured the services of this
director for a longer period of time
than any former director of Union
operas has ever spent in Ann Arbor
and in addition is endeavoring to sign
up a special dancing instructor who
is now supporting Fred Stone in
"Jack-O'Lantern." If secured, the
latter will give training to members
of the cast as well as to the chorus
and will take advantage of the un-
usual opportunities afforded by this
year's book for the introduction of
innovations.
Banner Production Expected
Union directors assert that the pro-
fessional abilities of these men cou-
pled with a book fertile in openings
for individual and chorus hits will re-
sult in a production remarkable for
polish and originality. The first two
acts are already completed and the
third should be finished by the end of
next week. A large number of music
writers are at work on the score and
selections from their efforts will be
made shortly.
Tryouts to Be Held This Month
In spite of the late start on the
opera of this year and the handicaps
under which the Union has been lab-
oring, preparations were never so far
advanced at this date.
Committees will be announced next
week and tryouts will be called for
the latter part of the month. The
book affords a chance for a big cast
and numerous specialties.
STATE-WIDE RESISTANCE MEETS
PROPOSEI) TELEPHONE RATE
Ann Arbor is one among several
cities that have protested against the
attempt of the Michigan State Tele-
phone company to raise its rates. If
the company succeeds, the rates will
be 21 per cent higher than they are
at present. The attempt is being
made before the State Railway com-
mission, and petition has been filed
before this body ,asking for an in-
crease of 21 per cent in all cities of
the state except Detroit.
Twenty-eight other towns and ci-
ties of the state have made protests
before the board. The matter may be
carried before Postmaster General
Burleson.
PORTRAIT OF LATE PHARMACY
DEAN HUNG IN MEMORIAL HALL
A portrait of the late Dean J. 0.
Schlotterbeck, of the College of Phar-
macy, has been hung in the reading

room of Alumni Memorial hall. It'
was painted by Leon A. Makielski,
who is connected with the College of
Architecture of the University. The
portrait was presented on June 26 by
the alumni of the pharmacy college.
Dean Schlotterbeck was born in
Ann Arbor in 1856. He entered the
College of Pharmacy in the year 1885,
from which he was graduated in 1887.
He graduated from the College of Lit-
erature, Science and Arts in 1891 with
a bachelor of science degree in chem-
istry. In 1905 he was made dean of
the College of Pharmacy, which posi-
tion he held until his death in June,
1917.
German Propoganda Uncovered
Washington, Jan. 8.-Upon inves-
tigation by the United States it has
been exposed that Francisco Villa re-
ceived $300,000 worth of munitions
paid for by a German agent through

13,000 YANKEES IN
NORTHERN RUSSIA
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 8.-American forc-
es in Siberia and northern Russia total
12,941 officers and men, the warde-
partment announced today. In Siberia
are 255 officers and 7,267 men, and in
northern Russia there are 5,419 men.
The units in the Archangel region
are the 339th infantry, 1st battalion of
the 310th engineers, the 337th field
hospital, and the 337th ambulance
company.
In Siberia: are the 27th and 31st in-
fantry, D company of the 53rd tele-
graph battalion, field hospital com-
pany No. 4; evacuation hospital No.
17, medical supply depot No. 7, 146th
ordnance depot company, ambulance
company No. 4; four staff officers,
quartermaster corps detachment, com-
prising two officers and 27 men; med-
ical detachment of 12 officers and 67
men, and a small detachment of ordn-
ance, signal corps, engineers,,cavalry,
intelligence, Phillippine scouts and
photographic corps.
S. A.o T. C. PAY CHECKS
READ TO M91lL TODAY

ONLY
IN

MEN WHO HAVE HANDED
HONORABLE DISCHARGE
PAPERS TO GET PAY

The last of the December pay
checks for S. A. T .C. men will be
mailed this morning. Pay will be
given only to those who have return-
ed their honorable discharges. Up to
last night there were still 42 men
from various companies who had not
done so. These men in order to re-
ceive their pay in Ann Arbor must
turn in their discharges at Major
Ralph H. Durkee's office in the new
Union building before 9:30 o'clock
this morning. Those who failto do
so by this time will have to send
them to the quartermaster at Chicago
to get their money, causing them-
selves unnecessary delay.
Company 13 Payroll Delayed
The company 13 payroll which was
delayed in Chicago due to a mix-up
at the quartermaster's department
there, arrived in. Ann Arbor yester-
day and will be given out this morn-
ing to those who have returned their
discharge blanks, or bring them to the
office.
Two Plead Guily to A. W. 0. L.
The two men woh were ordered to
be court-martialed for being absent
without leave just before the vacation
were dismissed several days ago.
Both of the men pleaded guilty and
were let off with slight punishment.
They were both deprived of their pay
for the time during which they were
absent from the service and of course
their discharge blanks show the rec-
ord of their offense.
The following men have not turned
in their honorable discharge papers:
Company 7: Buehrer Dearborn,
Gaethke, Gibson, Hutson. Isham, and
Walker. Company 8: Cadwell.:
Company 9: Anderson, Bossong,
Murchison, and Walker. Company 10:
Kosmensky and Wittkop. Company
11: Eaton, Gevirtz, Kilbury, Mitts,
Morrison and Shampo. Company 12:
Dyment. Company 14: Bleich, Had-
den, and Whinery. Company 15:
Bond, Close, Greenbaum, Leonard,
Morrisey ,and Wilhelm. Company 16:
Albert, Carter, Davis, Fishpaugh,
Ohlheiser, Reynolds, Riley, Schmidt,
Slotnick, Umphrey, Waite, and Lud-
ington.
MEN CONTINUE TO
ENROLL IN COLLEGES
Re-enrollment continues in all col-
leges of the University. Late yes-
terday afternoon, a total of 229 stu-
dents had enrolled in the engineering
college, 29 of whom were new en-
trants The rest were former S. A.,
T. C. and naval unit men.
Since the holidays, 19 medics, 12
dental student;, and two homoeopathic
students hae registered in their var-
ious schools.
South African Student Dies of Flu
Henry Marais, '181. died at Robert-1
son, South Africa, on Oct. 18, 1918,1
during the influenza epidemic. Marais
had been home only three months'
when he was stricken. While at - the
University he was a member of the
South African union and the Cos-
mopolitan club.

JURY CONVICTS 5
SOCIAISTLED ERS
Chicago Court Indicts Men Attempt-
iug to Interfere with
Draft
GERMAR CLAIMS "RED
FLAG TO KEEP FLYING"
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Jan. 8.-All of the five So-
cialist leaders tried for conspiracy
to violate the espionage law were
found guilty by a jury late this aft-
ernoon in the federal court.
The defendants were charged with
conspiracy to violate the espionage
law by delivering speeches and cir-
culating published articles with the
willful intent to cause insubordina-
tion, disloyalty, and refusal of duty
within the naval and military forces
of the United States, and with inter-
fering with the recruiting service and
the enforcement of the selective draft
law.
Conicted Men Face Big Terms
The convicted men face prison terms
of from one to 20 years, a fine of from
$1 to $10,000, or both, at the discre-
tion of Judge K. M. Landis, the trial
judge, who will fix punishment later.
Attorneys for the defendant imme-
diately presented a motion for a new
trial. Judge Landis fixed Jan. 23 as
the date when he will hear argu-
ments on this motion.
Guards Search Witnesses
The jury deliberated- five hours and
50 minutes before agreeing on iC's
verdict. Unusual precautions were
taken by the government to prevent
any outbreak in the cont room,
agents of the department of justice
searching every man who entered the
room to listen to the reading of th
verdict.
The jury halted in its labors for five
minutes at 11:45 o'clock out of re-
spect for the memory of Theodore
Roosevelt. Out in the corridor the
defendants, their lawyers and friends
were forced by the bailiffs to remove
their hats while the city paid its re-
spects to the former President.
Berger Shows Disappointment
With the ex'ception of Berger, who
appeared nervous, the defendants lis-
tened to the reading of the verdict
without a sign of emotion.
Victor L. Berger said:
"The verdict is a surprise to me.
I was certain that the jury would
acquit us and the case clear every-
one. I am no more guilty of this
charge than the judge on the bench.
I have been p citizen of this country
and stood for the principles for
which I have been tried for 37 years.
Now,'if I am to be persecuted for
them, I shall accept my fate like a
man.'
Adolph Germar said:
"The verdict came as a shock to me
because I felt all along that we would
be set free. We are not discouraged,
however, and will keep the flag of
Socialism flying."
The other defendants declined to
make statements.
ADELPHI TO COMPETE FOR
CUP IN ORATORICAL CONTEST
The annual all-campus oratorical
contest for the silver trophy cup will
be held this year soon after the begin-
ning of the second semester. Adelphi
House of Representatives will com-
pete for it this year for the first time.
Alpha Nu now holds the cup. Its only
competitor in former years has been
the Athena Literary society.

Adelphi decided at its regular meet-
ing Tuesday evening to enter the con-
test. They will hold their annual
banquet, which was omitted last year,
in February.
Five new members were recently
elected to the society. They are Os-
car A. Brown, '22; Benjamin C. Fair-
man, '21; Shiji Yonemoto, '20E; Mor-
ris H. Marks, '22, and Robert Roth-
man, '22.
UNION DANCES RETURN TO
9 TO 1 O'CLOCK SCHEDULE
Lots of time to find the best cuff
links and cool their heels in the par-
lor, while she powders it, is afforded
the campus swains by the Union's re-
sumption of its pre-war policy, 9 to 1
o'clock dance schedules.
The first dance under the good old
regime will be offered Frlday night of
this week and tickets are on sale at
the Union now, while they last.

FRATERNITY HOUSE
INJURED BY FIRE
A fire early yesterday morning part-
ially destroyed the Sigma Phi Epsilon
fraternity house at 621 South State
street. It is thought to have origin-
ated in a defective chimney near the
furnace. Two members of the fratern-
ity were asleep in the house at the
time but were awakened by the ar-
rival of the firemen.
The building was partially covered
by insurance amounting to $6,000, but
furniture worth about $1,000, which
was moved in just the previous after-
noon, was competely destroyed. A few
personal belongings which were in the
house were saved.
One fireman, Henry McLellan, was
slightly injured when a portion of the
second floor collapsed, carrying him
with it.
The alarm was turned in at 3:15
o'clock and the firemen left the build-
ing about 6 o'clock.
CREDIT OFFERED TO MEN
RETURNINGFROM CAMPS
AMOUNT WILL BE DETERMINED
STRICTLY ON MERIT
BASIS
Merit alone will determine the
amount of credit to be given students
returning from training camps. Each
case will be treated individually by
the committee on advanced standing,
and the credits given will be based
entirely upon the work accomplished.
Men who have been at officers'
training camps ,as well as those who
have already earned commissions, are
to be given advanced credits. Stu-
dents returning from artillery, en-
sign, aviation schools, and all other
officers' training schools will receive
credit for work accomplished which
is similar to the work of certain
curses in the University.
Those students who enlisted but
did not go to officers' training camps
will also be given credit, equal in
amount to that granted men recently
discharged from the S. A. T. C.
Outside of the regular courses an-
nounced in the catalogue of the liter-
ary college, few if any of the first
semester courses will be repeated
during the second semester. Though
many students will return in Febru-
ary for the first time this academic
year, it is not thought advisable to
recontinue courses especially for these
students. Practically all the elemen-
tary and freshmen courses are re-
peated the second semester, and this
custom will continue as before.
PRESIDIENT OF FRANCE PLANS
TO RETURN WILSON'S VISIT
Paris, Jan. 8.-President Poincare
wil no doubt visit the United States
in June or early in July. This an-
nouncement was made by the presi-
dent himself to the Associated Press.
When it was suggested that the
greatest reception ever accorded a
foreign ruler was awaiting him, the
president said:
"I must return President Wilson's
visit. I am looking for the honors
of a reception. I simply wish to
thank America and Americans for
what they have done for the cause of
liberty and France.
GERMANY VIOLATES TERMS
OF ARMISTICE, SAYS FOCH
(By Havas Agency)f
Paris, Jan. 8.-At the last meeting

of the armistice commission Marshal
Foch called attention to the action of
the Germans, who he says, while evac-
uating Poland and the Baltic prov-
inces, left their arms with the bol-
sheviks, thus violating the conditions
of the armistice.
Marshal Foch added that Germany
would be held accountable for the
damage done by the bolsheviks thus
armed.
Reading Room in Alumnae Hall
Alumni Memorial hall has at last
been completely disrobed of its Host-
ess house garb, and is again appear-
ing in its old role of reading room
for University students. The Alumni
office alone remains to be restored to
its former gaurters, but it will proba-
bly be re-established within a few
days.
Students may take advantage of the
reading material from 8 o'clock in the
morning to 10 at night.

PRICE THREE CENTS
SIMPLE FUNERAL RITES MARK BURIAL
OF ROOSEVELT NEAR SAGAM ORE HILL;
ENTIRE U. S. BOWS IN DEEP MOURNING

daily to Boost
U: ofIlichigan
Copies of The Michigan Daily are to
be sent to 150 high schools of the state
and to 100 high schools in other parts
of the country for the rest of the Un-
iversity year. This is being done to
advertise the University, and incident-
ally, The Daily, according to Harold
Makinson, '21M, buiness manager of
the paper. "I believe that it is the
duty of a publication to serve the Un-
iversity and this is the best way we
can do it," he said.
It was planned to send The Daily
to these high schools beginning last
fall, but war time cnditions interfer-
ed and the plan could not be put into
operation until the present time.
The list of high schools to which
papers will be sent was furnished by
Registrar Arthur G. Hall upon re-
quest of The Daily, who recommended
those secondary schools which. send
the most students to the University.
Letters are being mailed to the lib-
raians of the various high schools.
Their content in part is as follows:
"We realize the interest which high
school students have in university af-
fairs. We know that the prospective
college student welcomes all informa-
tion concerning university life. With
this fact in view, we are sending you
a complimentary subscription to The
Michigan Daily for the rest of the col-
lege year."
Ann Arbor Coupe
Win War Crosses
The croix de guerre has been award-
ed to Mrs. George W. Patterson, Jr.,
by the French government, according
to word received here yesterday. Her
husband, Aspirant George W. Patter-
son, Jr., son of Professor and Mrs.
George W. Patterson of this city, has
also been awarded the French cross
for extraordinary gallantry in the
Argonne fighting. Aspirant Patter-
son, who has been connected with the
42nd field artillery of France, went
through all the later engagements, of
the war.
Mrs. Patterson's war cross was giv-
en to her by General Petain for her
work as a member of Auto unit No.
7, of the French Red Cross, which fol-
lowed the third French army through
the engagements in the Soissons and
Compiegne sectors.
Aspirant Patterson and Mrs. Pat-
terson were married in France last
June after a war romance in which
both Americans met in the service
of France. As Miss Susan Ryerson,
Mrs. Patterson joined the Red Cross
more than a year and a half ago.
PROF. R. T. CRANE TAKEN ILL;
CLASSES MET BY PROF. REEVES
Prof. R. T. Crane of the political
science department, was taken sud-
denly ill at his home yesterday morn-
ing and Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, who
has just returned from Washington
where he has been in the judge advo-
cate's office for more than a year, is
taking charge of Professor Crane's
classes for a few days. Professor
Crane is said not to be seriously ill
and will probably be able to resume
his duties soon. He has been in charge
of both Professor Reeves' courses and
his own for the past year and a half.
UNION ALLIES WITH M. C. IN

REPORTING TIE OF TRAINS
J.
The well-known congestion of the
telephone wire leading into the Michi-
gan Central station is to be relieved
through the kind offices of the Michi-
gan Union. Hereafter the degree of
lateness of any train may be deter-,
mined by calling the desk at the
Union. This is for the special accom-
modation of Union members and it is
even suggested that the attendant will
stand ready to offer fraternal sympa-
thy to the worst sufferers. ..

WIFE OF EX-PRESIDENT REMAINS
HOME DURING IMPRESSIVE
CEREMONIES
FOREIGN COUNTRIES PAY
RESPECTS TO AMERICAN
Ann Arborites Stop Business for Brief
Period Yesterday at Time of
Funeral
(By Associated Press)
Oyster Bay, Jan. 8. - Theodore
Roosevelt lies at rest tonight be-
neath a cemetery knoll near the ram-
bling rural highway along which he
travelled so many times in boyhood
and in manhood between the Saga-
more Hill house, which was his home,
and the quiet village of Oyster Bay.
Perhaps no other ex-President of
the United States has been paidthe
tribute of so simple a funeral as the
one which was given Colonel Roose-
velt this afternodn on the shore of
Long Island Sound. Military and
naval honors were not his in death,
only because it had been his wish,
and that of his family, that the last
rites be surrounded only with the
simple dignity that might attend the
passing of a private citizen.
Many Representatives Present
But the American nation, the for-
eign governments as well, sent repre-
sentatives, as did also the state and
city in which he was born. These
noted men sat sorrowfully in the
pews of the little red gabled Christ
Episcopal church while brief serv-
ices of prayer and Scripture readings
were held without a eulogy, in which
so much might have been said. There
was no singing or organ playing.
Trains were heavily delayed by a
snowstorm, but each one brought." a
throng-some of them invited, most
of them not, and content to stand out-
side Christ church, or in the road,
during the service at the cemetery
to show their respect.
Mrs. Roosevelt, who has borne up
bravely since her husband's suddenr
death Monday, did not leave the house
at Sagamore Hill after the brief me-
morial there. Sharing her husband's
antipathy to funeral ceremony, she
bade goodby to the body of her com-
panion in the house where they lived
together so many years.
Home Service Brief
The home service was one of prayer
alone, lasting only five minutes. The
prayers were offered by the Rev.
George E. Talmage, rector of Christ
Episcopal church.
The funeral procession from the
house to the church was composed
of 15 automobiles. Those assigned to
the first car were Mr. and Mrs. Nich-
olas Longworth ,Mrs. Archibald
Roosevelt, Mrs. Richard Derby and
Mrs. Douglas Robinson.
Church Crowded
Preceding the motor hearse by 10
minutes, Capt. Archie Roosevelt and
Theodore Douglas Robinson went to
the ivy-covered church to make final
arrangements. E'very seat in the
church was occupied and some stood
in the rear and around the walls.
Christmas decorations-giving rise
to thoughts of the holidays and g6d
cheer-were still in place in the
church. Evergreens were in the
chancel, and attached to the roof was
a large green Christmas bell.
After the church service, attended
by less than 500 relatives, personal
friends, political and literary assist-
ants of the former President and rep-
resentatives of American and Allied
governments, the cortege was to move
to the cemetery, halting at the en-
trance, from which it was planned to
carry the casket to the Roosevelt plot
a short distance away. After the

brief committal service of the Epis-
copal church the body was to be low-
ered into a grave already lined with
concrete.
Marshall There
President Wilson was represented
by Thomas R. Marshall, Vice-Presi-
dent, the Army by Gen. Peyton C.
March, and the Navy by Admiral C.
McR. Winslow, and delegations repre-
sented both branches of Congress.
Gov .Alfred E. Smith and leaders of
both branches of the legislature repre-
sented New York state.
(Continued on Page Six)

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