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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 14, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHICAN DAUl V

OFFICIAL. NEWSPAPE R AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
lring the university year by the Board in
ontrol of Student Publications.
1EMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRkJSS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
o the use for republication of all news dis-
atches credited to it oranot otnerwise credited
i this paper and also the local news putb
shed herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
ichigarn, as second class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.5o.
lh ces: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Phones. Business, gto; Editorial, 2414.
Commuuications not to exceed 300 words,
s igned, the signature not necessarily to ap-
car in print, but as ani evidence of faith, and
otices of events will be published in The
aily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
t or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no
>nsideration. No manuscript will be re-
rned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the
ntiments expressed in the communications.
fildred C. Mighel.........Managing Editor
arold Makinson.........business Manager
:harles R. Usius, Jr........... ,.. City Ecdtor
larguerite Clark.... ....NightId..r
ames C. J. Martin.........Telegraph Edhiia
iseph A. Bernstein..... .Siort Lditor
'intent' H. Riorden.........Military Edtor
artha Guernsey............Womens Editor
ark K. lshlbert........ .. oAssociate Editor
elen I. Davis..............iLiterary Editor
,eGrand A. Gaines.,Advertising Manager
gnes L.Abele........Publication Manager
onald M. Major.......Circulation Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
avid L~andis Paul Gw. Weber
orace W. Porter Philip Ringer
uth Dailey E. D. Flintermann

REPORTERS
Christie Herman Lustfield
,s Bowen Schumacher
HenryO C'Brien
zier Renaud Sherwood
Lane Marie T horpe

,iia Anpe]
Marie Cro
nary U, 1

M. D. Vincent
BUSNESS STAFF
Mark B. Covell Robert E. McKean
Edward Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
Eva R Welsh Wm. A. iLeitzinger
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1918.
Issue Editor-Renaud Sherwood
DON'T FORGET TO COME BACK
You men who are making your suit-
case-laden way toward the railroad
stations these days, don't forget to
come back! You are planning to re-
turn in February or next fall; you've
told the fellows so, and that's what
you're going toi tell people when you
get home-for a while anyway.
But it won't be many weeks or prob-
ably even days before you will begin
to hear reasons advanced why you
should change your mind. There are
lots of things to do in that home
town of yours and some of them pay
good money. In spite of the fact that
home town folks are prone to scoff
at the value of "college," the fact that
you have been here for a year or two
or even a few months is going to give
you an advantage over other return-
ing men in getting a job. All around
you opportunities will open up; you
will realize that some of them are
blind alleys, but you will also be con-
vinced that others are not, and espec-
ially if the money to continue in the
University comes hard or isn't in
sight at all, the temptation to forget
your resolution to come back and fin-
ish will be overpoweringly strong.
So before you go home to meet this
situation take stock of yourself as
you now are, consider what you will
be ten years from now if you complete
your college course, and what you will
be if you do not. These are the fac-
tors which a man should take into
consideration before making a big de-
cision. Imperfect as conditions at kthe
University have been this fall, small
as the chance has been for men in
the military units to get full value
from their academic work, still you
have at least received some impres-
siois and standards by which to judge
the degree of mental training which
you possess at the present time. Is it
all that you could ever possibly need?
If it seems sufficient to enable you
to meet any situation in which you
now imagine yourself, are you sure
that the unexpected, the big chance,
may not some day come to you?
Look farther ahead than this winter
or next year. Think of the time that
comes to every man who has neglect-
ed opportunities for training when he
reaches the job that marks his limit.
Think of the finest people you know,
the kind whose friendship exhilarates
you and fills you with a restive de-
sire for self-betterment. Think of
what it would mean to you to build
yourself up to mental equality with
them.
And then promise yourself that with
all the power of will you possess, that
you will keep your resolution to re-
turn from being one of the New Year
variety guaranteed to be broken be-
fore JSan. 1.
Come back to Michigan; she has
pledged herself to make it worth your
while if you have the stuff in you,
and Michigan keeps her word.

THE JUNIORS TAKE HOLD
The juniors have officially undertak-
en the task of re-establishing student
traditions and have invited the seniors
to help them. Sophomores as well
as freshmen are to be reminded of
the duties and observances proper to
their years and station. This is a
little bit hard on the pride of '21,
which made an honest effort early in
the fall to do its duty by the fresh-
man class. However, the chief sopho-
more failing is not lack of ability to
discipline the verdant frosh, it is a
tendency to volate sophomore tradi-
tions. The red toque is not as fre-
quently seen on the campus as it
should be, sophomores smoke "M"
pipes unconcernedly on the senior
benches and generally act as if the
word traditions applied only to year-
lings.
All this emphasis on conduct, seem-
ingly of little moment, is justifiable
because of what these student conven-
tions symbolize. It makes little dif-
ference to the upperclassman whether
the frosh removes his hat at com-
mand or not as far as the action it-
self is concerned. But long years of
experience has left the knowledge
in the race of college men, that the
act of removing his hat causes the
newcomer in the University to real-
ize that however large a pebble he
feels himself to be, he is now on so
large a beach that it will be some
time before his size will make him
conspicuous; also that all about him
are numerous other rocks of geologic
venerability and no mean proportions.
,Army life and regulations have in-
terfered sadly with the customary ob-
servance of these significant forms,
but with the passing of the military,
they re-assert themselves with their
old strength, thanks to the energy of
'20. If the class can maintain its
motto of. "firmness, but no hazing,"
it will not only perform a service for
Michigan and the present underclass-
men, but will set a standard of loy-
alty and good sense for future class-
es to measure up to.
Life in the army hasn't sweetened
the student soldiers particularly.
Most of them would have melted yes-
terday if it. had.
The burning sands of the desert
weren't as dry yesterday as deserts
are reputed to be. Something like dry
Detroit.
It is reported that Mr. ilsonP f
the U. S. A. is getting ready to hold
his peace conference.
No R. O. T. C. Mars shakes the dust
of Ann Arbor from his feet.
Well, and did your old landlady kiss
you on both cheeks?
Midsemester time .is all the time
this year.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
TO HOLD CONCERT
The twilight concert to be given at
3 o'clock Sunday afternoon under the
auspices of the School of Music in co-
operation with the War Camp Com-
munity service will be quite out of the
ordinary in that it will consist mainly
of comunity singing. During the pre-
sent year this sort of music has been
provided, for the soldiers and sailors
of this University, under the direc-
tion of Theodore larrison, and it is
now planned to provide similar pro-
grams for the general public from
time to time. In addition to the famil-
iar hymns, patriotic, and trench songs

which will be sung by the audience
with words thrown upon the screen,
James Hamilton of the vocal faculty
of the School of Music will sing a
group of "Negro Spirituals" which
have been arranged for solo voice by
Burleigh. These songs are used large-
ly by the southern negroes at their re-
ligious camp meetings.
The general public is cordially in-
vited to attend the concert, no ad-
mission is charged but parents are
requested not to bring small children.
Flu Masks Donned in Kalaniazoo
Kalamazoo. Dec. 12. - With the in-
fluenza epidemic closing ban again
being enforced in this city, schools,
churches, theaters and other public
places being closed, hundreds of
workers, particularly in the stores,
again are wearing influenza masks
to help prevent a spread of the con-
tagion.
In Bay City, Flint, Saginaw, and
many other towns the masks are al-
so appearing again. It is understood
that 1w. Olin, secretary of the state
board of l'alth, recommends that res-
idents of all inflenza ridden towns
use masks.
You will :'mways find satisfaction by
adveritsing in the Daily-Adv.
Daily want ads bring results.

WILL TELEGRAPH
JEWISH CONGRESS
Jewish students of Michigan are
planning to take an indirect part in
the great Jewish congress which meets
in Philadelphia today. They will gath-
er at 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon
in Lane hall and forward a telegram
to the congress expressing their ap-
preciation of its importance and their
co-operatioti in its aims.
The Philadelphia congress is come
posed of Jews from all over the na-
tion delegated with authority by the
Jews of America, who beside discuss-
ing Jewish problems of all kinds, ex-
pect to bring the "Jewish question"
before the world peace congress now
convening at Versailles. Hope is high
that the Jewish question of the last
two thousand years will there reach
a settlement. Thousands of Jews
were recently massacred by Poles in
Poland and their American kin are
uniting to prevent the repetition of
such atrocities in the future.
The interest in reconstruction work
and in the solution of the Jewish ques-
tion is expected to bring out the Jew-
ish students in a body for Sunday aft-
ernoon's meeting. Speakers for the
meeting will be announced later.
MIXER TO BE HELD AT BAR-
BOUR GYM THIS AFTERNOON
The annual all campus mixer giv-
en by the Women's league will be
held at Barbour gymnasium at 2:30
this afternoon. Its purpose is to
help all the students on the campus
to become acquainted and to promote
general good fellowship among the
students.
An admission of 25 cents will be
charged. The proceeds of this affair
will go to the war work which the
league has undertaken. The mixer
will be chaperoned by members of the
advisory board of the league.
The committee in charge of this af-
fair consists of Lois de Frie, '21, and
Katherine Kilpatrick, '19.
The league extends a cordial invi-
tation to all students to come to this
mixer. Everyone is asked and if in-
dications today may be relied upon,
there will be a record breaking crowd
at the mixer.
Always-Daily service-Always.
PRE-CHRISTMAS SALE
Oureentire stock of Winter Hats
will be closed out regardless
. of cost.

W omen .
A reception for Masques will be held
from 3 to 5 o'clock this afternoon a,
the home of Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson,
927 Forest avenue.
Basketball practice will be held for
seniors and sophomores at 5 o'clock
Monday afternoon.
Final try-outs for the freshman
Girls' Glee club will be held at 4
o'clock Monday afternoon at Miss
Nora Hunt's studio in the School of
Music.
"WEAR MORE CLOTHES AND SAVE
COAL" SAYS CHICAGO DOCTOR
Chicago.-"It is our patriotic duty
to put on more clothes, save coal and
improve health", was the substance
of an address before the Public Health
Administration section of the, Ameri-
can Public Health association by Dr.
Jeannette F. Throckmorton of Clari-
tan Iowa.
"There are fashions not only in
dress but in trend of thought and
morals" Dr. Throckmorton continued.
"Of these that of protection seems
most often disregarded by the gentler
sex. The custom of wearing summer
clothing in winter is a pernicious
one and the continuel chilling of the
skin causes congestion of the internal
organs with attendant ills.
"Erect carriage and gait are impor-
tant qualities and are influenced by
the style of corset and shoes worn.
"Dress and morals are intimately
associated and modesty in dress ap-
pears in demand but little at pres-
ent. Our adolescent daughters often
use poor judgment not only in dress
but in conduct."
Negro Wins Phi Beta Kappa at Kansas
The Daily Kansan announces the
election of four seniors to Phi Beta
Kappa. One of the four chosen was
a negro, the first of his race to win
such an honor at Kansas.

MICHIGAN

CALENDAR

It is better this year than ever before and the price
ONLY 500

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

Don't fail to visit our new lunch room.

)

Everything to Eat
Hot and Cold Drinks

We make our own baked goods..

{

TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM

338 Maynard

Across from Arcade

"""rrr

When you go home
Take with you a

THE "Y" INN AT LANE HALL
S. A. T. C. MEN EAT WHERE YOU GET GOOD FOOD
WHOLESOME, HOME-COOKED, BALANCED MEALS
Lunch-11:45-12 :45-40 cents Dinner-5:30-6:30-50 cents
Lunch and Dinner Per Week, $5.00
Will close Friday night, Dec. 20th. Open Sunday noon, Jan. 5
OPEN TO MEN AND WOMEN

Hotel Allenel
ANN ARBORS' LEADING HOTEL
Chicken Dinner
5UNDAY-1I:30 to 2:00

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

- AT

$1 .00

I

S H EEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

Special Attention Given to Dinner.
Parties and Banquets

1

Stevens & Pershing
618 Packard

I

ARNOLD & CO.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH

Jewelers
220 S. MAIN STREET

UNCLE SAM SAYS:
"Our people will be wise
and patriotio enough not
to neglect the reoreation
neoessary to m a i n t ai n
their efficlency." What do
you say?3
See tomorrow's Dally for anawar

WATCHES AND DIAMONDS

Week-End Program

Howards, Gruens, Hamiltons, Elgins, Illinois

Tonight at 7:30
MOTION PICTURES
7-Reel Special Feature
Pipe Organ Accompaniment
TOhARROW
16:3-Morning Worship
12:00-Bible Class for College
Men and Women.
6:00-Social Hour and Eats.
6:30-"America As Seen Thru
the Eyes of China."

I

The big assortment of Ladies' Wrist Watches specially
priced from $12.50 upwards.
We invite your inspection to our line of fine diamonds.
Selling at a saving of fully 20 per cent under the present mar-
ket prices.

ARNOLD & CO.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, An Arbor and Jackson
(October 27, 19r8)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:10 a.
in., and hourly to 9:1o p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. n. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:05 p. rm., 1:so p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:4s p. M., z:ao a. in.,
x :xo a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. M., to
12:20 a. m.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-B

2205. MAIN STREET

I

R
i

Students Welcome.

SPORTING GOODS
CAMPING OUTFITS
Hunting Coats, Caps, Sweaters,
Rubber Boots, Ponchos, Rain-
coats, Gloves, Leggings, Sheep
Skin Coats, Mess Kits, Camp
.Furniture, Tents, Cots, Blankets
and everything you need. Hun-
dreds of other articles.
FOR XMAS PRESENTS

WILL YOUR COLLEGE EDUCATION END WITH THE DEMOBILI-
ZATION OF THE S. A. T. C.I

814 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

IT SHOULD NOT.
IT NEED NOT

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $5000.00
Resources ........$4W-0)00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
O D. .MORRILL
Typewriters.
Typewriting
Mimeographing

Many acceptable gifts for your
soldier friend in service; or as
a present to your officer instruc-
tors in charge of S. A. T. C.

The Company, which yearly opens the doors of the colleges to
thousands of men, is making a special effort to assist the men in the
S. A. T. C. who now, through lack of funds may be compelled to leave
college.
Do not leave cohlege until you have had an Interview with Mr.
Peter Mihelich of the Law Department. Mr. Mihellch will meet all men
interested in continuing their college education, in the lobby of the
Michigan Union on Sunday, December 15th from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

'

Write' for Catalog
37 West 125th St., New York City

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