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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 13, 1918 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-13

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HE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13,

3tdpigan DUitQj

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE .
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published evey morning except Monday1
E wring the university year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
4IEMjER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled'
.o the use tor republication of all news dis-7
hatches credited to it or not oterwise credited,
n this paper and also the local news pub-
sished herein.
bntered at the postnice at Ann Armi
tlicitagai, as becond class mattei.
Subscriptiuns by carer ui mail,$3.5.
tillces. Ann Abor Press Building.
% hones .Susiess, 960; 1ditria,
:Otiiuuw'Lt iiatoivib Dt to exceed j0 w0i' .,
t £igmed, th . i~.uA lure u t uecearn t aj-
,piar io print, but as al evucce ui taitt, 11
iotices o events will be pubished i' te
'aiy at the discretion o1 the reditr, it let
at -or maile to the otlce.
Unsigned coniaunicatns wil receive no
nsider-ation.. No manuscript will be re
tured unless the writer icluses postage.
"'he Daly does nt necessaray endorse t.
.sentinients expessed i the communications
Mildred L. Mighell..........Managing Editur
'arold Makinson..........business Manager
Charles R. osius, Jr..............City citor
Marguerite Clark .............Night Ediw'r
James C. J. Martin........elegraph' Edit:s
Joseph A. Bernstein...........Sport Editor
incent 11. Riorden.......... Military Editor
Martha Guernsey........... Wonei's Editor
' Mark K. Ehbert .......Associate Editor
Helen I. Davis..............Literary Editor
LeGrand A. Gaines. ...Advertising Manager
Agnes L. Abele......... Publication Manager
Donald M. Major......Circulation Manager1
ISSUE EDITORS
David Landis Paul G. Weber'
H orace W. Porter Philip Ringer
Ruth Dailey E. D. Flintermann
REPORTERS
Margaret Christie T Herman Lustfield
Irene Ellis Bowen Schumacher=
Edna Apel henry O'Brien1
Marie Crozier Renaud Sherwood
Mary D. Lane Marie Thorpe,
M. D. Vincent
BUSINESS STAFF
Mark B. Covell Robert E. McKean
Edward Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
Eva R. Welsh Wm. A. Leitzinger
FR'IDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1918.
Issue Editor-Ruth Dailey
MICHIGAN WOMEN
Several days ago an officer of the
students' army training corps in urg-
ing a system of military training for
women made the statement that
"nearly 50 per cent of the grrls who
attend college come for the social end1
of it and not for the benefits of a col-
lege education." Aside from the ob-
vious fact that this was quite extran-
eous to the question in hand, such talk1
is utterly false. It was an unnecessary
fling made by a man whose acquaint-,
ance with Michigan women is evident-
ly based on the sophomoric babble
of a certain type of nTale student, and
possibly an officer" tea or two. 1
.No person on the campus is in a bet-
ter position to know the facts con-
cerning the earnestness and scholar-
ship of various classes of students
than Registrar Hall. "Art entire lack
of information," he says, "is the basis
of this statement. The records in my'
office afford incontrovertible evidence
of the high grade of work done by the
women of the University." A glance
at any scholarship chart will show
how high the academic standing of the
women is in comparison with any
other group of students. Only the pro-'
fessional fraternities can compete'
with them. In the face of these facts,
either the earnestness and purpose of
the women is unimpeachable, or wo-
men have finer, more intelligent, and
better trained minds than then, and
it is doubtful if the officer in question,
or any other man for that matter, will
admit the latter alternative to be true.
His remark would be too preposter-
ous for notice were it not for the fact
that it is representative of the much-
mouthed opinions of a considerable
class of men students. Frequently one
hears the same man say at one time
that 1 the women in the University
are fiumps and no sane man shows

them any attention; then later he will
observe that all any of them do is go
to dances and angle for husbands.
Again he is heard to deplore that the
women take no part in campus activ-
ities, "have no pep;" next time he
holds forth to the attentive frosh, he
bewails that "it's certainly a fright
the way the women are getting to run
things around here."
Now these inconsistent exaggera-
tions and half-baked convictions are
not proof that men who advance them
are incapable of logical thought on
the very live social question of the
relations of the men and. women of
the University. It simply shows that
they have not outgrown knee-pants
consciousness of masculinity. They
are still sex-minded, a stage through!
which everyone passes, and which
some few never get over. But on the
other hand, most men and women do.
The older and more mature men in
the University do not display this
type of peevishness and the same men
who show it now will probably not
have a trace of it in five years. Mean-
while it is a bit wearing to the pati-
ence not only of the women, but of the
more thoughtful portion of the gener-
al student body as well.
Just now as Michigan is making a

er of candidates for world citizen-
ship, it is unfortunate that a class
of students who have ,displayed a
high degree of worthiness to take part
in the world's work should be subject-
ed to thoughtless insults 9f this kind.
The most opinionated wearer of the
red toque cannot deny that the work
and attitude of the women has been
all that it should be during the last
months. They have not only made
splendid records in every kind of pat-
riotic work, invested large parts of
their allowances and earnings in
financial support of the government,
undertaken unfamiliar and nerve-try-1
ing work, in college and out, made1
surgical dressings and garments for
soldiers and war sufferers-they have1
done not only these things, which it is
traditional for women to do, but they
have maintained the academic stand-
ards of the University and kept the1
institutions of student life alive, in3
some cases in full peace-time
strength. Eastern universities which
have no women students practically1
abandoned student enterprises for the"
duration of the war.
Now that the men who have served1
their country abroad and here in Ann1
Arbor are returning to student life, is
the service of the women to be en-
tirely forgotten and the popular and
vanity-soothing fallacy of their use-
lessness perpetuated?
Undoubtedly cases could be cited of
girls who come to the University for
social life only. On the other hand,"
the lounge lizard is not an unknown
species in this climate. And if the"
statement were made that 50 per cent/
of the women include a certain amount
of social life in their program no one
would have any desire to deny it.
But that any considerable proportions
of them come here for society alone is1
as true as that vast numbers of men
come to Michigan for no other purpose<
than to play fotoball.
The class of '20 promises to be stern
disciplinarians. Business of dismay
on the part of '21 which supposed its
course of sprouts was finished.
You may be going to the concert
Saturday night but here's betting
that you can't tell what the name of
the musican is.
Wasn't it a delightful surprise to
find on your discharge papers that you,
were entitled to railroad fare back to1
Ann Arbor? .
Pilgrim's progress is being enactedI
o' every street leading to the Q. M.1
th se days.
NEW PAPER KNITTING BAGS
ON SALE AT HEADQUARTERS
A sale of the newest things in knit-
ting bags is now being held at the"
Red Cross headquarters on Williams
street. They are to be sold at 50
cents apiece and the proceeds of the
sale will go to the war refugees.
The bags are made of paper and
have been pronounced very attrac-
tive, because of the art work pasted
on the sides of them. There is a
large variety of subjects from which
to chose, ranging all the way from
pictures of General Pershing and Red
Cross nurses, to peacocks and bounc-
ing children.
The bags are said to be the latest
style, and the women in charge of
the headquarters expect a success-
ful sale.
NEW TRAINING CAMP TO
UPLIFT LIFE OF CITIZENS
Camp Pershing will be opened at

Louisville, Ky., on or about January
6. It is to be operated in an effort
to present to civilians the upbuilding
influences of military life. Camp
Zachary Taylor at Louisville, Ky., has
been chosen as the place for this new
civilian training camp, which will be
under the command of Capt. F. L.
Beals, U. S. A.
A good moral character and citi-
zenship of the United States will be
the paramount requirements. For
further particulars address Capt. F.
L. Beals, care of Military Camps as-
sociation, Consumer' building, Chica-
go, Ill.
Lecture to Be Given on U. S. Medicine
There will be an illustrated lecture
o- the ministry of healing at 7:30
Wiv ck Sunday night, depicting the
wor k rf- Aerican doctorsin China,
Japan, cylon, and Africa. The lec-
ture wit.dbe held underthe auspices
of the 1.t tdent Volunteer Organiza-
tion of the University. Mr. N. C. Fet-
ter will be tre spokesman for the
evening.
The entire naval unit at the Univer-
sity of Kansas will be cleared out by
Dec. 21. About 150 men have ask-
ed for release and as a result there
will not be enough to maintain the

scKDLIRSHIPS OFFERED
AT WELLESLEY COLLEGE
OPEN TO GRADUATES OF OTHER
COLLEGES AS WELL
The Alumnae association of Welles-
ley college offers, for the school year
1919-20, two fellowships which are
available for graduate study.
The first fellowship of $350 is main-
tainel in honor of Wellesley's first pro-
fessor of Botany, Susan M. Hallowell.
It is open to any graduate of Welles-
ley or other colleges of good standing
who is a candidate for the M. A. de-
gree at Wellesley.
The second is the Mary E. Horton
fellowship of $350 and is'available for
graduate study, for a higher degree at
Wellesley or elsewhere. This fellow-
ship is maintained in honor of Welles-
ley's first professor of Greek and is
open to Wellesley graduates only. In
general preference will lb given to
those applicants who have already
taken the master's degree.
Resident Fellowships Attainable
The holder of either of these fellow-
ships, if she is to study at Wellesley,
may also apply for one of the resident
scholarships of $175, which is offered
by the trustees to graduate students.
The amount of this scholarship cov-
ers tuition for one year.
Preference will be given those can-
didates who desire to make definite
preparations, in their year of study,
for immediate service in connection
with war or reconstruction work.
Applications for these fellowships
should be made by personal letter to
the chairman of the committee, Prof.
Eliza H. Kendrick, Wellesley, Mass.,
and should be accompanied by:
1. A certified record from the reg-
istrar of the college which awarded
the earlier degree or 3degrees.
2. Testimonials from instructors
as to ability and achievement in the
lines of study proposed.
3. Testimonials from qualified
judges as to health and character.
4. Specimens of scientific or liter-
ary work in the form of publications,
papers, notes, outlines, collections,
etc.
Applications to Be in By Harshl
Moreover, the committee reserves
the right to withhold either of these
fellowships in case no excellent can-
didate is found among the applicants.
Applications for the year 1919-20
must be in the hands of the committee
by March 1, 1919. Documents will be
returned if accompanied by postage
for the purpose; but letters written
directly to the committee will be re-
tained. The committee of awards con-
sists of the following alumnae of
Wellesley college: Prof. Eliza H. Ken-
drick, chairman; Prof. Elizabeth H.
Palmer, Vassar college, Poughkeepsie,
N. Y.; Mrs. Martha Mann Magoun, 70
Kirkland street, Cambridge, Mass.

! WfomnenI
Basketball practice will be held for
seniors and sophomores at 5 o'clock
Monday afternoon.
Final try-outs for the fres man
Girls' Glee club awill be held at 4
o'clock Monday afternoon at Miss
Nora Hunt's studio in the School of
Music.
The annual freshman spread to be
given this evening will start prompt-
ly at 7:30 o'clock in Barbour gymnas-
ium,
University girls who have been
making comfort bags for war work
are requested to turn them in not
later than today at Barbour gymnas-
ium.,
MEDICAL SCHOOL TO REMAIN
SAME AFTER DEMOBILIZATION
The demobilization of the S. A. T.
C. will not cause any changes in
the schedule of the Medical school,
Dr. C. W. Edmunds, assistant dean,
stated yesterday. While there have
been a good many medical students
in the local army and navy units, they
have uniformly been excused from
drill to attend the late afternoon
classes. None of the regularworknhas
been curtailed, and no military cours-
es have been inserted this year. So
the schedule will continue as usual.
HOSTESS HOUSE TO STAY OPEN
FOR SERVICE TILL VACATION
Nothing has been changed in the
routine of the Hostess house with the
departure of section B, of the S. A.
T. C. It is expected that it will re-
main open until the close of college
for Christmas vacation, at the end of
next week.
There is not nearly so much work
to be done now, since the disband-
ment of section B, but two orderlies
are kept on duty to take care of any
need which may arise for their serv-
ices.
REGENTS TO DECIDE FATE OF
OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
The Board of Regents will decide
at its meeting today whether or not
a unit of the reserve officers' training
corps should be re-established at the
University this year. The conclusion
reached by the University Senate is
to be reported and considered.
T. B. C. Society Establishes Clinics
The Michigan State Tuberculosis
society, headquarters in Washtenaw
county, is holding free clincs through-
out the state where examinations can

When you go home
Take with you a

MIHIGN

CALENDAR

O

It is better this year than ever before and the price
ON LY 50c

W Fi R'

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

EFor Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASK US
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 5. Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

- dw AT +

SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

I -

be made without cost to those exam-
ined.
Arrangements for a clinic ire now
being made for Allegan county. One
will be established in Eaton county
next week. Miss Charlotte Ludington,
nurse, is in charge of these clinics.
Always-Daily service-Always
Daily advertising is profitable:--Advt
Magazine Subscriptions
for XMAS GIFTS
STOFFLET'S Newsstand

Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St.
t

Make Your Seledtions Early

STHE ANSWER
Billiards and Bowling
HUSTON BRE S.
"We try to Treat You Right"

FOR LIBERTY

The following casualties are re-
ported by the commanding general of
the American Expeditionary Forces:
Killed in action, 286; died of wounds,
85; died of accident and other caus-
es, 5; died of disease, 116; wounded
severely, 678; wounded, degree unde-
termined, 4585; wounded slightly, 239;
missing in action, 356. Total, 2,223.

BOXES, all sizes
TAGS
X;ACA RDS
STICKERS
at the New Store

VERY NEW AND
ARTISTIC

THE

LYNDON
606 E. Liberty St.

SHOP

I

4

MAKE YOUR SELECTIONS

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit. Ann Arboi and Jackson
(October 27, i,98)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:xo a.
m.. and hourly to 9:ro p. in.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8 :48
a. i., and every hour to 9:48 p. . )Mx
presses make local stops wvest of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:oS p. m., 10:50 p. M.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. M., 12:20 a. M.,
i:io a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local, Cars West Bound-7 :48 a. m., to
12:20-a. i.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R

GO TO

The MayrShie

of CHRISTMAS

TOILET ARTICLES

PERFUMES

Company
112 S. Main S#.

IVORY COODS

CAMERAS

THERMOS BOTTLES

1

314 s. State St.

Ann Arbor

AT

FOR

Fine Stationery
Engraved Cards
Die Stamping
Printing
Ruling
Book Binding
Leather Goods
Office Supplies
Filing Devices
Desks.

T HE E BE RBACH & SON CO.
200-204 East Liberty Street
SERGE PROKOFIEFF
New and Unusual Russian Pianist
"Third American Appearance"
Will appear in HILL AUDITORIUM in place of Leopold Godowsky
SATURDAY, DEC. 14, 8 P. M.

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources.........$,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
0. D. MORRILL
Typewriters
Typewriting
Mimeographing

TICKETS

- $1.00 - $1.50 - $2.00

Chairs
Book Cases

Season Tickets admitting to concerts by Prokofieff (Sat. Dec. 14);
Bonnet, organist (Sat. Jan. 18); Seidel, Violinist (Sat. Feb. 8); Caruso
and assisting artists (March);and including $3.00 May Festival coupon
still on sale at University School of Music.
$4.50 $5.00 $5.50 $6.00

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