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December 11, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

IGE MILITARY LIFE
FOR WOMEN STUDENTS

LIE UT.
HERE

MCCASKEY SAYS
HAVE BENEFITTED
TRAINING

MIEN
BY

"Military training for college girls
would be very beneficial, and I ap-
prove of it highly," said Lieut. George
H. McCaskey, medical officer of the
S. A. T. C. "Nearly 50 per cent of the
girls who attend college come here for
the social end of it and not for the
benefits of an education. Military
training would improve them men-
tally and morally, aside from the
disciplinary advantage gained."
More Regular Food Needed
"It would be the best way to in-
sure the physical development of the
girl while she is growing." Lieutenant
McCaskey says the food should be of
uniform rations, instead of all the
nicknacks that girls now eat. They
should have uniform hours of sleep
and recreation under a regime similar
to that of the men. He has found
great improveimeit in the men leav-
ing the service, over their previous
examinations, and believes that mili-
tary service for girls would have the
same good results. There are large
military schools for girls in Califor-
nia, Mississippi, and Vermont, which
have proved that the military organ-
ization for girls is very practicable.
The school in Vermont is connected
with the state university.
Authorities Here Endorse It
Marion 0. Wood, instructor in Phys-
ical Education for girls in the Uni-
versity, praises the military idea in

regard to compulsory drill, regular
hours for sleep and the wearing of
more sensible shoes.
Compulsory physical education for
all members of the student body
would be the best thing for them ac-
cording to Dr. W. E. Forsythe, of the
University Health Service.
Dr. Eloise 'Walker, of the Health
Service, believes that girls really need
more sleep than anything else, and
that there should be some way in
which they could be made to have
more.
WAR AGENCIES TO HUNT WORK
FOR.DEMOBILIZING S. A. T C.
Through the co-operative efforts of
the employment department of the
Army Y. M. C. A. and the War Camp
Community Service, a thorough can-
vass of Ann Arbor will be made with-
in the next few days in an effort to
secure work for men who will enter
college from the S. A. T. C. At pres-
ent 144 names have been handed in
P *ishing employment of one form
or another, but the positions open
have not been sufficient to fill the de-
mand. It is for this reason that the
canvass is to be made.
AnysUniversity men wishing to
earn some money during the next few
days by helping in this canvass should
call 4t Lane hall immediately after
dinner and ask for Mr. Feter or Mr.
Bacon.
U. of Toronto to Erect XemorWa
The alumni of the University of To-
ronto have decided to erect a me-
morial to commemorate the sacrifices
which have been made by many of
her graduates.

Daily want ads bring results.

PHONE PHONE
1701 1701
Shows at Sh s at
2:00 JTIC 2:00
8:30 3:30
7:00 7;00
8:30 J a I .8:30
TODAY and TOMORROW
-IN-
"Less than Kin"
He changed his mind about living another man's life
when the other man's wife and children appeared
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
Dorotthy Dalton
D E CORAT IN

PROHIBITION LEAS LL
OTHER REFORMISSUES
CENTRAL STATE LEGISLATURES
TO DISCUSS BIG PROBLEM
Chicago (By correspondence of the
Associated Press).-Prohibition will
overshadow all other reform issues in
the legislatures of the central states,
which will swing underway early ne
month. Every state not already dry
will take action through the legisla-
ture.
The Ohio legislature, overwhelm-
ingly "dry," will have up for adop-
tion a state-wide prohibition amend-
ment and legislation revamping the
taxation laws to meet the big deficit
resulting from the loss of liquor rev-
enues.
Michigan to Strengthen Laws
In Michigan bills will be introduced
to strengthen the state prohibition
law, to create a state budget commis-
sion to pass on appropriations, and
to establish a central board to pur-
chase supplies for state institutions.
One of the principal contests at the
Illinois session is expected to devel-
op the federal prohibition amend-
ment. The senate is "dry" and both
sides claim the house. Legislation for
the calling of a constitutional con-
vention, approved on Nov. 5, will be
dealt with.
Both sides are already claiming
victory in the coming fight over adop-
tion of the federal prohibition amend-
ment by the Wisconsin legislature.
Measures prohibiting unfair tactics in
marketing and preventing the teach
ing of foreign languages in schools
lower than high schools also will be
acted upon.
Ninnesota Women to Vote
Statutory prohibition, woman suf-
frage and proposed tonnage taxes on
iron ore will be vital issues before
the Minnesota legislature, which also
will take up legislation to prevent
future disastrous forest fires.
Iowa "Drys" in Majority
In Nebraska, prohibitionists claim
sufficient members to ratify the federal
prohibition amendment, and the
"drys" in the Iowa legislature like-
wise claim a majority in both houses
for the amendment. The Iowa legis-
lature is expected to be confronted
with measures intended to provide
relief for returned soldiers and sail-
ors.
Besides action on the federal prohi-
bition amendment, the Missouri leg-
islature will take up revision of the
statutes and an important mortgage
recording tax measure.
Maintaining the State Council of
Defense as a peace time organization
and ratification of the prohibition
amendment will hold interest in
Kansas, and the submission of an
amendment for state-wide prohibition
will be an important issue in Texas.
Y. M. C. A. SECRETARIES STICK
TO JOBS IN DRIVING RAIN
It would seem that "Y" men believe
in keeping up the good work until
the last minute. All secretaries spent
a busy day yesterday extending the
glad hand to discharged and home-
ward bound mechanics.
The most creditable piece of work
was done while about 125 wet and
hungry men were lined up waiting to
secure tickets for the 6:05 train.
Some inspired workers commandeer'ed
all the sandwiches and coffee in a
nearby restaurant and passed it out

in true army-style. It was greatly
appreciated by the men who reward-
ed the "Y" men with many compli-
ments and enthusiastic cheers.
Section B men have been making
a general rendezvous of the army
"Y," and they will be greatly missed,
Mr. Fetters declared, when they leave
Ann Arbor. Movies are still to be
kept up by the "Y," in spite of the
exodus occurring everyday now. To-
night there will be pictures at New-
berry hall, and Thursday afternoon at
Lane hall.
CAPT. W. H. GORDON, '16M, IS
RELEASED FROM PRISON CAMP
Capt. William Henry Gordon, '16M,
is on his way through Switzerland to
France after being a prisoner in a
German camp since last April. A
photograph of him taken in May in
the camp accompanied the news and
he looked to be in fine health, not-
withstanding the report that he had
had one or both hands amputated by
the Huns. Captain Gordon was cap-
tured by the Huns in April and short-
ly after that the word came that he
had been promoted from lieutenant to
captain. He was in a Masonic unit
at the time he was captured, serving
under the British flag.
.Kee p posted -subscribe for th
Daily, now $3.00.-Adv.

s
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TODAY

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Shubert-Garrick, Detroit - "Oh, *

* Look!"

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Majestic - Wallace
"Less Than Kin."
Arcady-- Bert Lytell
expected Places," and
Events.
Wuerth - Florence

s
*
Reid in *
*
in "Un-*
Current ,*

AT THE THEATERS

Re

"Wives of Men," and also
edy.

ed in*
com- *
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#

,* * * * * * * * * *1

AT THE MAJESTIC

Of the numerous meritorious pho-
toplays in which Wallace Reid has
starred in the last year, none presents
a happier mixture of thrills, mystery
and laughs, than "Less Than Kin,"
the latest Paramount starring vehicle
for Mr. Reid which will be shown at
the Majestic theater today and Thurs-
day.
This is especially true as regards
laughs. The first laugh comes when
Mr. Reid, as Lewis Vic5ers, a dare-
devil young American, who is tem-
porarily sojourning in Central Amer-
ica because he is "wanted" in tb
United States for murder, tries to
drill a motley Central American army,
which is mounted on mules, burros
and horses. The difficulties of get-
ting this "worst army in the world"
as Mr. Reid calls them during re-
hearsal, in shape, provides some
screamingly funny situations, which
will be heartily appreciated by all
who see the picture.
The thrills and mystery come when
Vickers, in his desire to return home,
assumes the name of a young ne'er-
do-well, whom he resembles amaz-
ingly, and whose death he had wit-
nessed. The imposture provokes many
situations that hold the interest as
by a spell. Vickers eventually finds
love; fortune and happiness, and the
development of the story throughout
is one of .unusual charm. Mr. Reid's
viz-a-viz is dainty Ann Little, who
has been seen to fine advantage with
Mr. Reid in many of his photoplays.
The supporting players include the
best procurable in the field of the si-
lent drama.,
THE NEW BOOKS
"THE RECKONING" - by James
Beck. Published by G. P. Put-
nam's Sons, New York, 1918.
In view of the present status of in-
ternational affairs, when the repre-
sentatives of the allied governments
are about to meet to determine the
terms of peace, and when the Presi-
dent of the United States is speeding
to the conference table as the mouth
piece of the American nation, Mr.
Beck's latest book, "The Reckoning,"
is strikingly pertinent. And because
we feel that the decisions reached
at the peace table must be made in
such a way as to prevent their be-
coming "scraps of paper" within an-
other 50 years, we welcome every
thinking man's advice and solutions
on this most tremendous of all ques-
tions. Mr. Beck has concerned him-
self exclusively with this very sub-
ject.
"The Reckoning" is not a war book
as the public has come to know it. It
is rather a constructive analysis of
the causes and results of the war, in
the light of interpretation of their
meanings relative to a peace settle-
ment. Its thesis is best statd by Mr.
Beck himself in the following quo-
tation from his book: "The auth:
believes firmly that a durable victory
may not be achieved without the dis-
integration of the Prussian Empire,
and that the higher demands of ret-
ributive justice will not be satisfied
unless the reactionary empire of Bis-
marck is first destroyed." This prin-
ciple of retributive justice involves
an understanding of the Prussian Em-
pire and its coiplete historical de-
velopment. The author has therefore
interpreted Prussian history as he
sees it and all of his conclusions rest
on a historical basis.
As in previous works on the war,
more particularly in "The Evidence

in the Case," also by Mr. Beck, one
is struck by the unusual clarity which
characterizes the entire structure of
the author's argument. There is a
power of interpretation of recent
events in the light of literature which
few writers of political affairs show.
From the presentation of the basic
idea, the Higher Law, to the last
chapter on the Terms of Peace, as
conceived by President Wilson, we

s

s:

feel that a man of sound moral as
well as political judgment is speak-
ing. What is of equal importance, the
author proves himself to be an Amer-
ican, with the future of the entire na-
tion at heart, rather than the gains
of a party or section of the country.
Graduate Course
To r lectricals
"Next year we expect to have a
graduat course for students in elec-
trical engineering, is the statement
made by Prof. John C. Parker yester-
day. "At present only undergraduate
work is taken up, embracing more or
less elementary work together with
some advanced materal. A graduate
course will ease up the undergradu-
ate work and offer opportunities for
concentrated advanced training."
The liens of development planned
for this course cover the departments
of communication; taking up the wire-
less, telegraph, and telephone, and the
study of power plants and of power
utilization. Of these, the development
of communication facilities seems to
open up the most fruitful field.
The war has brought on new, as
well as more, general uses of these
means of communication. For exam-
ple, during the war, people have been
using the telegraph more than ever
before, very often as a more con-
venient substitute for mail communi-
cation. Having now acquired the
taste for that convenience, it is hard-
ly probable that they will relinquish
its use. From a speculative point of
view, Professor Parker believes that
the time may come when wireless may
supplement the telegraph in many of
its functions and in many cases re-
lieve the wires.
All the work will take in courses
in physics, mathematics, and econom-
ics. The importance to good engineers
of a sound knowledge cannot be too
much emphasized, for intelligent work
in engineering is based on economic
principles.

ARCADE
Hours: 3:00, 7:00, 8:30
Phones:
Office, 296-M; Mgrs Res., 23x6-M
Wed-11-Bert Lytell in "Unexpected
Places" and Current Events.
Thurs-Fri-12- 13-Constance Talmadge
in "Good Night Paul" and Christie
Comedy, "Some Cave Man."
Sat-14-Gladys Leslie in "The Mating,"
Gaumont News and Comedy.
Sun-Mon-15-16---Tom Moore in "Thirty
a Week" and "Smiling Bill" Parsons
in "Up a Tree."

-I

!,I liii I mI 111ill III 1 1IIIIIIIIII
WuerthTheater
BOOKINGS FOR DECEMBER
Tues-Wed - 10-11 - Florence Reed in
"Wivesyof Men." Seven Parts. Also
Comedy.
Thur-Fri - 12-13 -Charotte in "The
Frozen Warning." In Six Parts. Also
War Review and Conie 'y.
Sat-14-Bryant Washbuirr in "The Ghost
of the Rancho." Also Weekly and Com-
I - edy, "Great Water Peril."

-
Y
I -

0rphemTheater
BOOKINGS FOR DECEMBER
Thurs-Fri-12-13-Jack Abbe in "Mystic
Faces." Also 2-Reel Comedy.
Sat-14-Monroe Salisbury in "The Red,
Red Heart." Also News and Comedy.
Sun-IS-Douglas- Fairbanks in "Headin'
South." Also Ford Weekly and Comedy.

_I ;

MA JESTIC
,. 3:30-7-8:30
MAJESTIC ORCHESTRA Nightly-All Shows Sunday
TODAY and TOMORROW
WALLACE REID
"Les thena Kin"
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
DORTHY DALTON
"GREEN EYES"

GARRICK Wednesday
DETROIT I Saturday
SECOND AND LAST WEEK
with the DOLLY SIST RS-UARRY FO

h.

j)Iedical Students

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A I I

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