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October 06, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

., ..

VICES IN
DR CHURCHES

AR

st Congregational Church
ing service will be at 10:30
The subject of the sermon
"Preparedness for Peace."
it-Major Fischer will speak on
lent in Arms" at 6:30 o'clock.
Thomas Catholic Church
ning today and continuing
i the winter, services will be at
8:30, and 10:30 o'clock. The
ather Burke will speak on
a Supernatural Gift.'
Zion Lutheran Church
sh service at 8:30 o'clock Sun-
tool at 9:30 o'clock and Ger-
rvice at 10:30 o'clock with an
by the Rev. E. C. Stillhorn.

German M. E. Church
services will be held in
today.

this

First Baptist Church
ncis Stiff ler, army camp secre-
stationed in Ann Arbor, will
at the morning service at 10:30
k. Bible class will be at 12
k. Guild meeting at 6:30 o'clock.
First Presbyterian Church
Rev. L. A. Barrett will speak
10:30 o'clock service on "The
ider of Bulgaria." Social half
at 6 o'clock. Young people will
at 6:30 o'clock.
t Methodist Episcopal Church
Rev. A. W. Stalker will give a
a, the title of which is, "Is it r
to Hate ?' at 10:30 o'clock. Rev.
r will also speak at 7:30 o'clock

Unitarian Church
The Rev. William I. Lawrence,
Th.D., of Boston, will speak at 10:30
o'clock this morning. At' the Young
People's society at 6:30Ao'clock, Mrs.
W. B. Ford will read a paper on the
Unitarian conference held in Detroit
last week. There will be a meeting
of the church and society members at
the close of the morning service.
50 LOSE, LITES IN TNT
BLAST ATMORGAN, N.J1.
Perth Amboy, N. J., Oct. 6.-Army
officers investigating the explosions
which wrecked the great shell loading
plant of the T. A. Gillespie company
at Morgan, N. J., estimated tonight
that the dead would number not more
than 50 and the injured, 150. The!
property loss probably will approxi-l
mate between $15,000,000 and $20,-
000,000.
Late tonight the flames, which have,
been sweeping the buildings of the
Gillespie plant, appeared to be under
control, and there seems no danger
that they will reach the T. N. T.
stores remaining untouched. There
have been no serious explosions since
early in the afternoon and no addi-
tional damage has been done since
then. Army officers declare that the
danger is virtually over and they hope
tomorrow to begin a systematic search
of the ruins for the bodies of victims.
The Red Cross have established re-
lief stations for the thousands of ref-
ugees and have the situation well in
hand.
WIERD STYLES OF FOOTGEAR
TO BE TABOOED DURING WAR
Washington, Oct. 5.-Fancy models
of footgear are tabooed under the
provisions of the conservation and
standard price agreement between the
war industries board and shoe man-
ufacturers. Two color shoes for both
men and women are no longer to be
manufactured, and the number of shoe
styles will be reduced from about 650
to 150. The provisions cover only the
period of the war.
M. A. C. Defeats Albion, 20 to 7
.Lansing, Oct. 6.-The Michigan Ag-
gies defeated Albion 20 to 7 in a
loosely played game here today.

CENTRAL POWERS OFFER
NEW PEACE PROPOSALS
(Continued from Page One)
nected with the foreign office here,
even though this for many reasons
may not be thoroughly demonstrated
in his statement before the reichstag.
(By the Associated Press)
Chancellor Wlling for Peace
Amsterdam, Oct. 6 .-Other advices
say that the chancellor has not yet
made the statements credited to him
regarding the suspension of hostilities,
the appointment of plenipotentiaries
and the request for the Allies' terms,
but that it was understood he would
meet such proposals.
(By the Associated Press)
A powerful movement is apparently
under way in Germany for a general
armistice and peace. The new Ger-
man chancellor, Prince Maximillian of
Baden, is reported to have proposed
or to be on the eve of proposing a
general suspension of hostilities, the
appointment of plenipotentiaries to
meet at a neutral place for the dis-
cussion of a league for arbitration and
disarmament, and the forwarding of a
request totthe Entente Allies for their
terms. It is furthermore reported
that the German chancellor has ex-
pressed his willingness to accept
President Wilson's 14 peace condi-
tions.
Based on Wilson's Terms
Austria-Hungary through its minis-
ter at Stockholm is requesting the
Swedish government, according to ad.
vices from Berne, to transmit to Pres-
ident Wilson a proposal for a general
armistice with the Entente Allies and
start without delay negotiations for
peace. These negotiations are to be
based on the terms set forth by Presi-
dent Wilson.
And, finally, from Berne -comes the
announcement that Germany, Aus-
tria-Hungary, and Turkey intend sim-
ultaneously to approach President
Wilson with the object of having him
make representations to the other En-
tente Allies for a general armistice
and negotiations looking to peace.
The best and safest. The Building
and Savings Association never paid
less that 6 per cent dividends. H. H.
Herbst, Sec'y. Savings Bank Build-

WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
3 o'clock-Open house at the Michi-
gan Union.
3 o'clock-Christian Science lecture
by Frank Bell at the Whitney Thea-
ter.
6:30 o'clock-Young peoples' meet-
ings at the Presbyterian, Methodist,
Baptist, Unitarian, and Congregational
churches.
7:30 o'clock-Evening service at the
Methodist church. Special music.
CHICAGO-MICHIGAN GAME
ATTRACTING MUCH ATTENTION
Traditional Rivalry and Revenge to
Animate Contests Between
Schools
The progress and record of the
University of Chicago is being watch-
ed very closely by Michigan fans this
year in view of the coming contest,
which is already beginning to arouse
nation-wide attention. The last time
the teams met was in 1905, when Chi-
cago won by a score of 2 to 0, on a
safety. So in addition to the tradi-
tional rivalry that characterized the
games over a decade ago, Michigan
will be animated by spirit of revenge.
While the Maroons have not yet
played their initial game, reports in-
dicate a powerful eleven. A large
field of candidates presented them-
selves to Coach Stagg and most of
them are already in an advanced stage
of training.
The Chicago-Michigan game has
been sanctioned by the military au-

We carry complete lines

ARMY UNIFORMS
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STETSON CAMPAIGN HATS
ARMY SHIRTS
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thorities and will be played in
cago on the date scheduled
The Daily at your door, $3.50.

Attention S. A*OT.cj
ยง[; '- - - - o

MAIN ST.

STATE ST.

.. ..

Chi- Dancing at the Packard Academy
every Monday and Thursday evening,
8 to 10. Private lessons by appoint-
ment. Phone 1850-F1.-Adv.

r
ANN ARBOR'S LARGEST AND ONLY MODERN FULLY EQUIPPED
CLEANING AND PRESSING ESTABLISHMENT

WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER

he Narrowness of Life."
of the 10:30 sermon is
i Song of Hate."

The
"The

St. Andrew's Church
nmunion at 7:30 and 10:30
k. Rev. Henry Tatlock ' will
: at the 10:30 o'clock service, and
ubject is "Two Moments of Hu-
Life." Vespers at 4:30 o'clock
a sermon on "Plains of War."
Church of Christ
e Rev. F. P. Arthur will deliver
rst sermon at 10:30 o'clock this
;r m3.-.l . ^

Your Fall Suit
will give you that
WELL DRESSED
APPEARANCE
if made by
A. F. MARQUARDT
We also make a specialty of
Officers' Uniforms
Meet us in our new quarters
608 E. Liberty Phone 17134

L

220 SOUTH STATE STREET

PHONES 1890-1891

ing. News students

are welcome. IDaily want ads bring results. ing. Money loaned.-Adv._____

R

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