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December 10, 1918 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-10

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THE WEATHER
POSSIBLY SNOW;
j COLDER I

ailg

ASSOCIATED
PRESSA-
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 60.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1918.

PRICE THREE

CHOCE SGHEDULES
GIVENWLVERINES
Athletic Director Bartelme Succeeds
In Arranging for Big Games on
Three Programs
COURT CONTESTS NOW ASSURRED;
GRID AND DIAMOND DATES SET
Athletic Director Phillip G. Bartelme
returned yesterday from Chicago, with
a series of the choicest athletic sohed-
ules that he has ever offered to the
Maize and Blue student body. The
football games for 1919 have been ar-
ranged for, while basketball and base-
ball programs for the coming season
have Also been completed. Track
alone, remains undecided.
The .season opens as usual with the
scientists from Case. The next Sat-
urday is an open date. This may not
be filled, as Conference itles allow
only seven games. Then 'comes as
strenous a series as Michigan teams
have ever faced; six strong games in
a row: M. A. C., Ohio State, Northwes-
tern, Chicago, Illinois, and Minnesota
on six successive Saturdays.
Five Ganes at Home
The student rooters will have fre-
quent opportunities to support the
team, for all but two games will be
played in Ann Arbor. The great day
of the season will be the closing game
on Nov. 22, with Minnesota at Ferry
field. This should come close to mak-
ing a new record for the Michigan
stadium, now held by the Penn game
of 1918.
Of the other Conference schools,
Illinois plays all her seven games with
Big Ten opponents, meeting everyone
but Northwestern and Indiana. Chi-
cago has six Conference games, drop-
ping her Minnesota struggle to make
room for Michigan. Michigan, Min-
neseta and Iowa have five league
games. Indiana again broke into Big
Ten schedules, after an absence of a
year.
The schedule was published Sunday.
tBasketball Assurred
All doubt about a basketball team
at Michigan this year was settled
when eight Conference games were
scheduled. The rest of the schedule
will be filled out with M. A. C., Case,
and smaller colleges. Of the five
played last winter Minnesota and In-
diana are dropped, and Illinois add-
ed. Four Conference games will be
in Ann Arbor, Illinois opening the sea-
son, Feb. 1.
Michigan's Conference games are:
Jan. 24-Chicago at Chicago; Jan.
25-Northwestern at Evanston; Feb. 1.
-Illinois at Ann Arbor; Feb. 21-Ohio
State at Ann Arbor; Feb. 22-Chicago
at Ann Arbor; March 1-Northwestern
at Ann Arbor; March 8-Ohio State
at Columbus; March 10- Illinois at
Urbana.
Contrary to announcement, the base-
ball schedule for 1919 was also ar-
ranged at the Chicago meeting. The
Michigan nine will play 17 games, 12
of them with Conference opponents.
Three dates at the beginning of the
season are left open. Seven Confer-
ence games will be played at Ann Ar-
bor.
Baseball Opens April 16
The season opens after spring va-
cation, and ends with Illinois June 7
at Ann Arbor. Of the teams met last
year, Notre Dame is dropped, and Big
Ten games with Indiana and Purdue
substituted. The features of the home
season will be the game with the
Suckers, and the two struggles with

the Maroons.
The schedule in detail: /
April 16- open; April 19- open;
April 23-open; April 26-Indiana at
Ann Arbor; May 2-Chicago at Ann
Arbor; May 3-Chicago at Ann Arbor;
May 9-Purdue at Lafayette; May 10
--Ohio State at Columbus; May 14-
M. A. C. at Ann Arbor; May 17-Chi-
cago at Chicago; May 19- Iowa at
Iowa City; May 21--M. A. C. at East
Lansing; May 24-Iowa at Ann Ar bo;
May 26-Purdue at Ann Arbor; May
31-Illinois at Urbana; June 4--Ohio
Sate at Ann Arbor; June 7-llini -
at Ann Arbor.
Track Schedule Undeaided
The Michigan track schedule has
not been made out, but the Conference
fixed the dates for the championship
meets. The indoor title will be set-
tled March 21, in the Patten gymnas-
ium, at Evanston. The outdoor meet
has been fixed for June 7, at Chi-

NAVY EXAMSSTART
HERE TOMORROW
The physical examinations of the
navy unit men "previous 'to release
from active duty will start tomorrow.
Before being released each man must
be examined and receive inoculation
and be vaccinated by the medical au-
thorities. The order in which the men
will be examined has not as yet been
determined. The examinations of the
men ought not to take long according
to naval authorities. They are still
confident that all the men will have
been given their inactive duty papers
by the twenty-first of this month.
Y. MUI C, As ACTIITIES
TO CONTINUE STRONGLY
BUREAU TO SECURE WORK FOR
DISCHARGED MEN TO BE
STARTED
The war activities of the local Y.
M. C. A. will be continued as long
as the military units are on the cam-
pus, the National War Work Council
having sent assurance of its support.
This news was welcomed by the lo-
cal board of the Students' Christian
association, as no provision had been
made for financing the work In the fu-
ture.
Parties Are Planned
The "Y" is planning a series of par-
ties during Christmas week for those
who remain here over the holidays
and the schedule will be published
later. Following the vacation, the ac-
tivities will be the same as those in
vogue with the civilian students, al-
though some of the special features
of the military work will be retaned.
It has not been decided whether both
Lane and Newberry halls will be kept
open, although the former is certain
to be used. The firniture which was
installed last year in Newberry may
be returned to Lane hall.
Bureau at Newberry Hall
With the aid of the War Camp Com-
munity Service, the "Y" will institute
a campaign to furnish employment for
discharged men. Mr. N. C. Fetter will
be at Newberry hall every morning
next week, and Mr. Francis Bacon will
be there from 4:30 o'clock to 6 every
afternoon to interview men who de-
sire employment.
The boardxof directors will meet
within the next few days to go ver
the details of the readjustment. It
is expected that the present staff of
secretaries will remain in their posi-
tions. The student cabinet will at
once make the plans and supervision
of the work for the remainder of the
semester.
Detroit Pastors
Call Down Hobbs
Prof. W. H. Hobbs was called to or-
der while making a speech before the
Detroit Pastors' union yesterday
morning for making partisan remaks
concerning President Wilson. He was
interrupted by the Rev. Joseph A.
Vance of the First Presbyterian
church, and the Rev. R. W. Nixon
of the East Grand Boulevard Meth-
odist church, while in the midst of a
tirade against the President..
"I object to this man's using this
organization to launch a partisan at-
tack on the President," said Dr. Vance.
Other members of the union ob-
jected to his interruption on the

ground that it would be discourteous
not to - let Professor Hobbs proceed.
He was finally allowed to continue.
ARCTIC EXPLORER AND NOTED.
AVIATOR TO SPEAK HERE SOON
Vilhjalmaor Stepanson, the discov-
erer of the "Blond Eskimo," and who
is credited with the discovery of new
lands about the North pole, will speak
in Ann Arbor some time during the
second semester. This will be the not-
ed explorer's first visit here. He had
planned to speak in Hill auditorium
early this month but his appearance
was postponed on account of the in-
fluenza epidemic.
"Pat" O'Brien, the Illinois aviator,
who has written a number of books
on his experiences on the western bat-
tle front and in German prisons, will
be another speaker to be brought here
soon by the University Oratorial as-t
soiation.

FlU EPIDEMIC MAY
COME BACK AGAIN
S. A. T. C. and Naval Men Forbidden
to Attend Theaters or Any
Gathering
FIGUREN FROM STATE SHOW
RISE I NUMBER OF CASES
Twenty-six cases of influenza and
five of pneumonia with two deaths as a
result of pneumonia, have been re-
ported to health officer J. A. Wes-
singer of this city since Dec. 5.
Dr. Wessinger stated that every pre-
caution is being taken to prevent a
second epidemic of the disease. He
urgedthatpeople shouldavoid meet-
ings where close contact is neces-
sary. People with a high temperature
or slight colds should go to bed and
remain there till well.
Dr. Wessinger also said that if peo-
ple would only use proper precautions
the necessity of placing a ban on pub-
lic gatherings would be avoided.
Guards Posted at Theaters
No information could be obtained
yesterday as to whether there are any
cases of influenza among the men of
the local military or naval units. Men
of both corps have been forbidden to
attend theaters or any public gather-
ing where large numbers of people as-
semble. Guards were posted in front
of all theaters last night to prevent
any man in uniform from entering.
Men of the naval unit will not be
given out-of-town passes or week end
leaves until the influenza has disap-
peared again. It is not belived that
reappearance of the disease will inter-
fere with the dismissing of the men
from military or active naval duty.
Cases in State Increase
(By Associated Press)
K Lansing, Dec. 9. - Influenza cases
reported to the state board of-health
total 1,858 as against 1,300 for last
Monday. The figures include Sun-
day's report.
Schools churches and theaters were
closed at Bangor and Fulton, where
today's reports showed an increase.
The situation at Three Rivers, con-
sidered serious a few days ago, was
said to be greatly improved.
WAR CAMP COMMUNITY SERVICE
GIVES DINNER FOR ARMY MEN
The War Camp Community service
has been exceedingly active lately in
helping on sings, movies, and dinners.
Saturday night a dinner was given
for Company 1, section B, in the base-
ment of the Methodist church and
about 300 men were served. The la-
dies from the various churches served
the dinner, which was furnished in
part by the company fund. The ice
cream was furnished by the War
Camp Community service.
Under the auspices of Roy Jacob-
son, member of the executive commit-
tee of the War Camp Community serv-
ice, church directories are being dis-
tributed at stores, railroad stations,
barracks and other public places.
COLLEGIATE ALUMNAE MEETING
HELD HERE LAST SATURDAY
Collegiate Alumnae held a meeting
Saturday afternoon in Martha Cook
dormitory, about 100 women from Ann
Arbor and Ypsilanti attending. Dis-
cussion of general business was fol-
lowed by an interesting program.
Miss M. E. Weade gave an account of
the work done by the Hostess house in
behalf of the S. A. T. C. and naval

unit men, the house having been start-
ed by Collegiate Alumnae. The main
discussion of the afternoon centered
about the new Hoke Smith bill an
equalization of education.
Prof. Allen S. Whitney of the de-
partment of education, presented
some new facts on the measure.
Cosmopolitan Club to Go to Reception
Members of the'Cosmopolitan club
have been invited to a reception to be
given at 8 o'clock Thursday night in
Barbour gymnasium. The president
wishes it understood that all foreign
students are invited whether or not
they have received invitations.
Grinnell College Has Quarter System
Although the academic side of Grin-
nell college is on the three quarter
system, the financial end is on the
semester plan, that is the fees are
semi-~a nnn il

NEWL REGISTRATION
INCLUDES ALLMEN
Non-Military Students Must Re-gis-
ter.. Failure to Do so
Means Drop
FEES TO BEGIN AT TIME OF
DISCHARGING OF S. A. T. C.
All students in the S. A. T. C. and
naval unit who do not re-register im-
mediately after their discharge or re-
lease, are no longer students of the
University, according to the college
officials. Students who are not in the
military organizations must also re-
register and those failing to comply
with this request will cause a great
deal of confusion on their part at the
end of the semeste.
Civilians Begin Wednesday
Beginning with Wednesday the ci-
vilian students should re-enroll at
once, the S. A. T. C. men as soon as
they receive their discharge papers,
and the naval unit men as soon as
released. In the literary college the
students should call at the registrar's
office, in the other colleges at the sec-
retary's office.
To Drop Men Not Enrolling
As the men are demobilized their
names are turned into the respective
offices, and there filed with the old
registration cards. If a student fails
to re-enroll, the secretary of his col-
lege takes it for granted that he has
left the University. Although the stu-
dents do not need to get permission
to leave school, as was formerly the
custom, yet all who desire a state-
ment of their standing or credits, may
call at the dean's office of his college.
Fees Are Adjusted
University fees for the remainder
of tie year, 1918-19, for discharged
army and navy students, may be learn-
ed at the secretary's office. In the lit-
erary college the fee for re-enroll-
ment during this week is $34.06 for
Michigan resident students, and $48.36
for non-Michigan resident; $44.06 for
Michigan resident students who are
just coming back to college, and $73.36
for non-Michigan resident. These fees
will decrease at the rate of about $2
a week. Nevertheless a student's fee
dates from the time he is discharged
and not when he re-enrolls. g
Godowsky's Place
to be Ably Filled
Serge Prokofleff, the sensational
young Russian pianist, is to take the
place of Leopold Godowsky in the pre-
festival concert Saturday, Dec. 14. Mr.
Godowsky is unable to fill the engage-
ment because of an operation which
he is undergoing in Portland, Oregon.
Mr. Prokofieff is a young Russian
whose debut in. New York a week ago
created an unexpected furore in the
musical life of that city. His profes-
sional talent has been developed amid
the terrible turmoil which has beset
his native country during the past few
years. He not only won many ova-
tions there but in a recent tour cov-
ering most of the musical centers of
England he was everywhere acclaimed
as the sensation of the day. After
his New York debut, Huneker, who is
recognized as the dean of musical
critics, devoted more than a column
and a half in one of the leading New
York papers in praise of this new
genius.
Mr. Prokifieff belongs strictly to the
modern school and while his programs

contain a goodly portion of numbers
from the old school, the public may
look forward to several novelties com-
posed by himself or other modern
writers.
COL. VAUGHAN TO SPEAK TODAY
BEFORE CHICAGO CONFERENCE
Col. Victor C. Vaughan: dean of the
Medical school, left Sunday afternoon
for Chicago, to attend the meetings
of the American Publican Health as-
sociation. The leading sanitarians of
the country have gathered for the ses-
sions which are to be held Dec. 9-12.
Colonel Vaughan speaks this mornng
before the association.
The most prominent subject of the
meeting is the influenza epidemic. In
his position as head of the bureau
of communicable diseases, Colonel
Vaughan has given especial study to;
the onrnoA nof iha A4noa in *than aihn~s

PRESIDENT CHOOSES
ALL COMMITTEES
Committees of the 1919 engineering
class were appointed by the class pres-
ident, L. Albert Lundquist, last Sat-
urday. They are as follows:
Social-Jeffs, chairman; Matthews,
Zylstra, and Huette; auditing-Steph-
enson, chairman; Christie, and Alt-
house; invitations-Spanagel, chair-
man; Burbridge, Koch, and Duelt-
gen; publicity - Nugent chairman;
Arnold, and Tobin; affairs - Ferris,
chairman; Lindstrom, and Hastrup;
picture-Cruse, chairman; Davidson,
and McAdams; reception - Miller,
chairman; Borland, Callier, and
Smith; sing-Glenn, chairman; Mat-
thews, and Jeffs; promenade - Van
Dusen, chairman; Thompson, Mac-
Farlen, and Babbitt; cap and gown-
Thonipson, chairman; MacFarlen, and
Verschoor; assembly - Dorrance,
chairman; Zingg, Spanagel, and Jeffs;
Michiganensian -Babbitt, chairman;
Verschoor, Dorrance, and Dow;
cane-Teitzen, chairman; Swartz, and
Palmer; swingout - Springer, chair-
man; Bovec, Khuen, and Smith; me-
morial-Dow, chairrman; Clingman,
and Nugent.
S. A.T. C. E AMINTION9
TO BE COMPLETED TODAY
SECTION B MEN AWAIT PAY ROLL.
NEW COMPANY FOR
UNDISCHARGED
Innoculation, vaecination, and phys-
ical examination of all men in the S.
A. T. C. will be completed when com-
pany 16 is put through this after-
noon. All of section B and some of
the companies of sectioif A have sign-
ed all the necessary papers required
for discharge. Men of section B have
been ready since Friday and will re-
ceive their actual discharge papers
as soon as their payroll is received
here. It was expected yesterday but
had not arrived up to a late hour last
night. It probably will be here today
according to the section B com-
mander.
Men who do not pass the physical
examination, because of some curable
disease or disability, are being form-
ed into a new company, the 17th. In
addition men who have not at been
assigned a serial nun:er by the War
department will be placed in this com-
pany as they cannot receive their dis-
charges until local authorities are in-
formed of such numbers being given.
The men who are held because of
physical reasons will not be released
from the army until they are cured.
They will probably be sent to the
hospital at Camp Custer when the post
here is abandoned.
Enough 0. D. woolen uniforms have
been received by the quartermaster
to outfit every man in both sections of
the S. A. T. C. Several companies
have already been issued the woolen
uniforms and have turned in their
khaki. Men who have not received
them as yet will be issued them to-
day as the quartermaster has turned
enough over to each company supply
sergeant.
ARTICLES NEEDED TO FILL
KITS FOR NAVAL HOSPITAL
University women have been asked
to make and fill as many comfort
bags as possible for the Naval hospi-
tal, Brooklyn, N. Y. In order to do

this .the following articles are re-
quested to be donated by the Univer-
sity girls and handed in at Barbour
gymnasium before Friday: writing
pads, envelopes, pencils, memoran-
dums, playing cards, hard candy and
life savers. The comfort bags are
completed but the material to fill them
is yet to be obtained and each girl
is asked to help in gathering the ar-
ticles.

BE PRESIENT OF
PEACE CONGRESS
WILSON NOT TO SIT AT WORLD
CONFERENCE; FAVORS FULL
PUBLICITY
HUN PLENIPOTENTIARIES
TO MEET DECEMBER 12
Admiral Simms, Commanding 39 Ships,
To Meet U. S. Representatives
Before Reaching Brest
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, via Amsterdam, Dec. 9.-4a-
thias Erzberger, head of the German
armistice delegation, announced to-
day that the French government had
requested the German army command
to designate plenipotentlaries to con-
fer regarding the prolongation of the
armistice. The delegates will meet
at Trevis, in Rheinish Prussia, Dec.
12 and 13.
(By Wireless to Associated Press)
On board the U. S. S. George Wash-
ington, Dec. 9. - President Wilson
probably will not sit at the peace
congress, but will be represented
there by delegates while remaining
in close contact with the other heads,
and questions will be referred to him.
Clemenceau President of Peace Table
Premier Clemenceau, it is believed,
will be president of the peace con-
ference. This is considered so, du,
to the fact that the conference will
be held in France.
President Wilson's disposition is to
favor entirely public proceedings,
such are carried on in the senate
chamber at Washington, with the
press representatives given every
facility to report the proceedings.
Simms to Meet Wilson's Ship
Washington, Dec. 9. - Admiral
Simms, commander-in-chief of all the
American naval forces in Europe,
will personally command nine battle-
ships and 30 destroyers, which is to
meet President Wilson's ship at sea
and escort it to Brest. Secretary
Daniels announced today that Admir-
al Simms' flagship will be the Wyom-
ing.,
upon the joining of these ships with
the Pennsylvania and the accompany-
ing destroyers, the entire naval escort
to Brest, and all ships accompany-
ing the President, will be under the
command of Admiral Mayo, command-
er-in-chief of the Atlantic fleet, whose
flag flies from the Pennsylvania.
Vice-Admiral Henry B. Wilson will
be in charge of the harbor and port
arrangements for the reception of the
President. The George Washington,
flying the President's flag as supreme
commander of the United States navy,
will enter a port through a channel
marked by vessels of Vice-Admiral
Wilson's command.
CLASSES IN MILITARY FRENCH
TO CHANGE TO REGULAR WORK
Courses in elementary French here-
tofore given over entirely to military
French, are now being changed to the
regular courses which build up a
grammar foundation first.
Military French placed more stresa.
upon certain phrases and expressions
common to the French people and
which would greatly aid the S. A. T.
C. men should they reach France. But

now that the war is over, more time
is to be spent on laying a solid gram-
mar foundation as is usually done in
such courses. Until the students who
have taken the military courses get
caught up with the other classes.
more intensive work will be given.
War Department to Discharge OfIcers
Washington, Dec. 9.-Discharge of
the officers in the army, as soon as
it is deemed permissable ,has been
authorized by the war department.

Prof. Hobbs Lectures This Afternoon
Professor W. H. Hobbs of the geol-
ogy department will deliver a lecture
at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon in the
Natural Science auditorium on "In-
ternationalism as a League of Na-
tions."
Company 13 to Attend Theater
Company 13, stationed at Barracks
41, will attend the Wihtney theater

Tryouts are wanted for the
editorial and business staffs of
The Michigan Daily. S. A. T. C.
and naval unit men who wish
to try out after demobilization
are asked to come in and regis-
ter. Business tryouts apply aft-
er 5 o'clock in the afternoon
and editorial between 1 and 4
o'clock.

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