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December 08, 1918 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8, 1918. THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGU

-ti
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VARSITY PRACTISES
IN HI SCHOOL GYM
Twenty Men Show Up at First Meet-
ing; Mitchell to Hold Gathering
Two Nights a Week
TEAM TO CHANGE COURTS AS
SOON AS SOLDIERS LEAVE
Decision of Conference Meeting to
Have Weighty Bearing on Court
Game Here
Despite the fact that Waterman
gymnasium is occupied by soldiers
who are using the basketball floor for
their barracks, Coach Mitchell has
succeeded in finding a place for his
quintet proteges to practice.
The Ann Arbor high school gym has
been secured for the purpose, giving
th prep school oflor a taste of such
high class basketball as it has never
seen before. The Varsity plaers are
rapidly rounding into shape despite
the fact that only a few nights of
practice have been indulged in.'
Good Squad Out
A squad of 20 men have been given
the initial workout by the coach. Sev-
en of them are freshmen, whom the
coach is in hopes of retaining on the
suad with the final decision of the
Big. Ten.
Should the final decision of the
Western Conference authorities sanc-
tion the use of freshmen on the Var-
sity squad, Michigan will be able to
;supply a formidable array of court
game men.
With Hewlitt, the only letter man of
last year, back on the squad, it looks
as thought the team will not have
enough \veterans to depend upon, yet
with men like Chon, Cartwright, Cruze
and Fortune in the running, 'together
with the freshmen, a strong team can
be developed.
Vick, Dunne, Jordan and Utz are
the freshmen on the floor. It is very
probable that a freshman team will be
organized with these men as the neu-
cleus, if the eligibilitytrules of the Big
Ten will not permit them to play in
donference contests.
Practice Held Yesterday
A workout was held in the high
school gym yesterday afternoon, with
passing as the main point of practice.
Three shortscrimmage periods were
also held, giving promise of some fast
men.
No regular time for the workouts
has been arranged for as yet, due to
the fact that the high school will nec-
essarily want some of the time on
their own floor. However, the next
practice will be held Monday and Wed-
nesday evenings at 7:30 o'clock.
It is hoped that the Waterman gym-
nasium will be vacated shortly, with
the discharge of the mechanics sta-
tioned there. However, it will be
necessary to remodel the place to a
certain extent. The military men are
using a temporary floor in the place.
This will have to be removed, and a
new floor built before the gym can
be used for basketball.
Chicago Looks Strong
Most of the Conference teams have
begun their preparation for the year's
court game, with Chicago looming up
as one of the strongest bunches that
will contest the honors. The Maroons
squad, just the opposite fromnits foot-
ball eleven, gives evidence of a stel-
lar career this season.
Illinois, it is thought, will attempt
to lay claim for the Big Ten honors,
as they have in football, yet they pro-
mise a more substantial claim for th

championship of the basketball sea-
son. They have already begun their
workouts, with a large squad of men
on hand.
Eartbquake Cause Great Loss in Chile
Santiago, Chile, Dec. 7. - Slight
earthquake shocks are still being felt
in Chile, following egreat earthand
sea quake which occurred Wednes-
day. Tidal waves and violent shocks
caused some loss of life and great
loss of property in the cities of Copi-
apo, Chanaral, and Taltal. The Chil-
ean government has taken charge of
the relief work.
S. A. T. C. MEN GET WORK
One hundred men may secure work
until February beginning as soon as
demobilized. Good pay and extra
bonus for good work. Inquire at of-
fice 721 N. University, Room A, be-
tween 11 A. M. and 8 P. M., this week.
We can use a few other students dur-

Pick- Ups

Gym credit will be given for soccer
at the University of Pennsylvania. A
call was issued for men last week and
practice has begun. It is probable
that games will be scheduled between
colleges now that the S. A. T. C. is
at an end.

Basketball practice at the
sity of Iowa began Friday.
suAeessful season is expected
of last year's men are back.

Univer-
A most
as most

A game for the championship of the
S. A. T. C. league at the University
of Illinois too place yesterday aft-
ernoon. Companies 2 and 6 battled
for the supremacy.
Two games were played between
girls' class soccer teams at the Uni-
versity._of Indiana. A varsity team
will be chosen from those who show
up the best.
Seventy men have reported for bas-
ketball practice at the University of
Illinois. The squad is the most
promising one 'that has been seen at
this university for Teveral years. Four
men are back from last year's team
and will form the nucleus of this
year's ,team. Practices are being held
in the evenings for most of the men
but a few have been coming out in
the afternoons. /
THREE BASKETBALL
OFFICIALS IN CITY
Three Ann Arbor men are on the
list of approved officials, according to
the basketball guide issued this week.
Two of these three are connected with
the University.
O. W. Stephenson is the dean of the
local referees. He is a graduate of
M. A. C., but is at present an instruct-
or in the department of history. He
travels extensively over the state in
basketball season. He worked in sev-
eral games for the Varsity last year.'
Henry R. O'Brien, another of the
trio; is ,& senior medic who played
basketball at Washburn. Since then
he has officiated for several seasons
in high school and intramural games.
N. A. Ottmar, the third man, is a tell-
er for a local bank, who has refereed
in the neighborhood of Ann Arbor for
several years.
To get on the approved list of ofli-
cilas these men submitted applica-
tions, with recommendations from
three basketball coaches or officials.
The applications were passed upon by
a central board, composed of repre-
sentatives of the Y. M. C. A., the Ama-
teur Athletic Union, and the National
Collegiate association.
Dates to Send Xmas Packages Over
Some people are under the impres-
sion that Christmas packages may
still be sent to the boys overseas.
The dates for sending presents to
soldiers were Nov. 18 to 20.
Law school at the University of In-
diana offers among its courses for the
next term, a professional law course
on legal equipment of social service
workers.

QUINTET GAME RULESI
CHANCEDBUT SLIGHTLY'
REVISION AFFECTS THE PLAYING
ZONE OF COURT ONLY
The official basketball rules for
1918-19 made their appearance this
last week, and Michigan followers of
the indoor game have been busy get-
ting up on the fine points. Those
who flock to Waterman gym this winV
ter will see but one change. Aside
from that the previous rules have
stood the test of time, and remain un-
changed.
The end zones established last year
proved a success. They will be still
further improved this season.
Zone Now Rectangle
The zone is now a rectangle extend-
ing two feet back of the basket, and
clear across the court, instead of be-
ing an arc, as last year. When the
ball is in play in this zone, it is in
bounds except in the case of a held
ball. In this event it is out of bounds,
and is given to the defending team
to put in play from back of the zone.
The backboard is now entirely within
bounds.
The institution of the arc a year ago
did away with one of the most annoy-
ing features of the old game, the rul-
ing out of a goal because the foot of
the man who made it happened to
touch the end line. The arc prevent-
ed many an "out of bounds" on close
plays beneath the basket. Extending
this end zone clear across the court
will aid the officials greatly, and will
prove simpler for the audience.
Uniform Rules
Uniform rules for the whole coun-
try are made by the Joint Rules com-
mittee, representing the Y. M. C. A.,
the Amateur- Athletic Union, and the
National Collegiate Athletic associa-
tion. Dr. Joseph E. Raycroft of
Princeton, formerly of Chicago, Is
chairman of the joint committee. The
college section is also represented by
L. W. St. John of Ohio State, Ralph
Morgan of Pennsylvania, and Dr.
James Naismith of the University of
Kansas.
M. A. C. GAME PROGRAM SALE
FULFILLS ALL EXPECTATIONS
Final records show that the Ath-
letic program for the M. A. C. game
had a sale of 3300 with a net profit
of about $200. This is the first sou-
venir program to be issued for the
M. A. C. game, as heretofore they have
been used only for the Pennsylvania
and Cornellgames.
While the sale did not equal the
sales of former years for the larger
games, it was all that the manage-
ment expected, as the crowd was
smaller and the numerous features at
the game, such as the airplanes and
bands, detracted from the sale, ac-
cording to Walter Reiss, managing
editor. This year's program was
more elaborate than any previously
put out, with cover design by a pro-
fessional and expensive cuts on the
inside.,
Patronize our advertisers.-Adv.

FIRST MICHIGAN STAR
RETURNSFROM SHEVC
FROEMKE, WHO DEFEATED THE
ILLINOIS ELEVEN, BACK
IN SCHOOL
The man who showed Illinois what
Michigan was made of, is back In the
University.
Butch Froemke, made famous in
one game, by scoring on the Illinoisl
university aggregation, bringing their
only defeat of the 1918 season, and
who is a product of Coach Yost, hast
succeeded in getting his discharge
registrations, and men who are 18;
in the University.
Played Half in 1917
The Michigan star, who played half<
on the Maize and Blue team of 1917,
and who answered the call of his
country by enlisting in the navy, was
one of the stars on the Municipal Pier1
Service team this year. It was in<
their contest with the Illinois eleven1
that he was made famous.t
Froemke is the first of a number of<
Michigan stars who will return to the1
school upon receiving their dischargest
from the service. Wieman and Sparks,
stellar grid men of the past few sea-
sons, are also expected back. With
these men to combine with Coach
Yost's 1918 squad Michigan should
turn out a championship team next
season.
Also a Baseball Star
Froemke is also a baseball star, and
will help materially in making up the
Varsity nine this comingspring. He
plays third base. With Knode, Gene-
bach and other stars, Michigan gives
evidence of repeating its champion-
ship 1917 season.
Despite the fact that Illinois fell
before the Municipal Pier team, and
especially before the talent of a Mich-
igan man, they disputed the Maize and
Blue claim to the title notwithstand-'
ing their unblemished record for the
year.
NAVY IS NOW OPEN TO MEN
FOR VOLUNTARY ENLISTMENT
Voluntary enlistment in the navy is
now open for men between the ages of
18 and 35. The term of enlistment is
four years and the applicants are not
requiredato have thepermission of
their local draft boards. Men of all
registrations, and men woh are 18
years of age but have not registered
are eligible for enlistment. The fol-
lowing and many other ratings are
open: seamen, electricians, black-
smiths, boilermakers, coppersmiths,
enginemen, machinists carpenters,
and cooks.
16,000 Casualties Still to Be Reported
Washington, Dec. 7.-The war de-
partment announced today that 16,000
major casualties-killed in action,
died of wounds or disease, wounded
severely, and missing-have not yet
been reported. These are expected
to be cleared up within a week. The
delay is due to discrepancies in in-
itials, or enlistment numbers, and to
the fact that the army was operating
on many fronts under many com-
mands. In all the later fighting, every-
thing was subordinated to pressing
the enemy for a quick decision.
Transylvania Gains Rumania
Berne, Dec. 7.- The national Ru-
manian council of Transylvania has
proclaimed union with the kingdom of
Rumania. Rumanian flags are flying
everywhere and great enthusiasm is
manifest.

BIG PROBLEMS FACE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
New York, Dec. 7. - The. annual
meeting of the National league, to be
held in this city next Tuesday, will
be the first step in the direction of

have a majority of the eight 'v
back of his name. The quartett
composed of John A. Heydler, p
ent secretary-treasurer of the leag
Lieut. David L. Fultz, former pr
dent of the Baseball Players' fra
nity;tFrancis X. McQuade, a city r
istrate of New York, and R
iBrown. of Louisville, Ky.

baseball reconstruction made neces-
sary by the war. While a number of Second semester at University
momentous problems confront the se- Pennsylvania will commence Jan.
nior league magnates at this time Examinations will be given during
there is no evidence that a concerted week of Dec. 14, and will be taken
program of action has been evolved. all men who wish to receive credit
Among the outstanding questions the work so far taken. Credit for
which must be considered by the club S. A. T. C. courses will be given
owners is the election of a league the basis of one unit for each tr
president; the future status of play- hours per week.
ers released outright last autumn;
National commission arrangements;'
playing plans for 1919; limitation of
club rosters and many other items of FR E E
routine business.
The election of a president to suc- Extra pair of trousers
ceed John K. Tener, who resigned j 0with every suit sold
last summer, is expected to be one
of the first features to be considered
by the magnates. So far as is known
at this time there is no favorite can- E. J. Schneider
didate. The names of four men have Stt
been mentioned in connection with
the position but no one appears to

ESTABLISH ED 1887

Anticipating the enlarged demand for Photographs
(for the boys over there) ive habe made special ar-
rangements to meet it. Holveber don't delay-time
is short.
Send your photographs by mXiland save your Xmas
boxes.for other purposes.

.4

_ .,.

School of Dancing

under direction of

Miss Jeanette H. Kruszka

Young Ladies' class in classical danc-
ing-Thursday, 7 to8 p. n
Girls' class (13 to 17 yrs.) in classical
dancing-Wednesday, 3:30 to 4:30
p. M.
Children's class (6 to +12yrst.)in classi-
cal dancing-Saturday, 2 to 3 p. m.
Young Students' class (14 to 18 yrs.) in
ballroom dancing--Saturday, 10:30
to 11:30a.m.
Private lessons by appointment.

Business: William St.
Phone 1422-R

Home: 2006 Washtenaw Ave,
Phone 1598

i

i

WE DO YOUR WORK WITH SPECIAL CARE

CHRISTMAS

CANDIES

-:PUT UP IN:-

Fancy Chinese and Japanese Baskets
Creton Boxes Leather Boxes Domestic Silk Boxes

. I

..{sue ate

'loo

b

Compaq y

II

BUY YOUR PRESENTS IN ANN ARBOR
Boxes are filled out of our own cases from
the choicest assortment of chocolates

F

- ---

"&~ ~on of g nergine"

BETSY

RO S

s

CLEANING

I

PRESSING

I

REPAIRING'

NICKELS ARCADE

_______________'I

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