100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 07, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rHEI MIC141GAN VAILU

SATURDAY,

f

...._.

's There?"

It! Who goes there?' 'The sen-
tered into the shadows of the
rmaster's depot on State street
> response came in answer to
allenge. "Who goes there, cor-
of the guard, post number 10,"
n an imitation bravado voice.
er or I'll fire."
as the daring sentry fixed his
at and charged the skulking
ws, thetcorporal of the guard
ded "itha squad. With a
Ie "sew" the "enemy" ran be-
the sentry's legs and down the
Now the sentry swears that
rporal would make a fine press
for Caruso or Ty Cobb.

Y. M. C. A. FACES HOUSING
PROPOSITION IN PARIS NOW
(By Associated Press)
Probably the biggest problem that
the Young Men's Christian Associa-
tion has to face in the city of Paris
is the housing of soldiers who flock
to Paris in thousands for 24 to 48
hours' leave. Every American boy
who comes to France is eager to see
the city of Paris, and the prices of
accommodation at the French hotels
is beyond the possibilities of their-
slender purses. The Y. M. C. A. has
several hotels where they can go and
for one franc a night can get a bed
and a shower. Meals are served at
cost.
LOST-Let the Daily find that lost
article. Use these columns.

our advertisers.-'Adv.

i

ouw man days of
mce do you get for
ery dollar you,
ind for clothes?
at's the only basis
which you can
ure balues.

4l
_ :F A

..
A ""
; it"r

/

r ' :i w

$28 $30
$32
$35 $3.750
and up to
$45

"DISEASES TO FOLLOW
WAR1" SAYS VGH
GREATEST DANGER LIES IN THE
SPREAD OF VENEREAL
INFECTION
"Infectious diseases will increase in
our country for the next two or three
years," Col. Victor C. Vaughan of the
medical department of the University
stated in an address given yesterday
afternoon in the Natural Science audi-
torium. "We are going to have re-
crudescence after recrudescence of
influenza for at least two years. We
shall have typhus here, as well as a
number of other diseases."
Waves of Infection Expected
"Waves of infection have followed
other great world wars of history.
From their, conquests the Greeks
brought malaria home with them. Aft-
er the Franco-Prussian war Germany
had more than 100,000 cases of small-
pox. In our own Spanish-American
war, the epidemics in camp were fol-
lowed, as the men were demobiliz-
ed, by scattered outbursts over the
country."
"Today many of our men are coin-
ing home infested with lice, and we
shall have typhus and relapsing fev-
er here. Trench fever is already wide-
spread in Great Britain. Our greatest
danger, however, will come in the
spread of venereal disease."
Colonel Vaughan, who is also the
dean of the Medical school, has had
charge of the bureau of communica-
ble diseases in the office of the sur-
geon general. Aside from venereal
infection, the greatest danger in this
present war, he stated, has been from
the acute respiratory diseases. This
was anticipated, for it was pneumonia
that had given General Gorgas the
greatest trouble at Panama.
Scientifie Film Shown
"The recent influenza crept into
this country through Boston," he
said. "It was expected in America,
and from last August on, every pre-
caution was taken at the seacoast. But
at last it appeared in the training
ships in Boston harbor, whence it
spread to Camp Devens, and then
quickly over the country. In camps
influenza ran like wildfire, but it mov-
ed more slowly through the civil pop-
ulation. For this reason repeated epi-
demics are expected."
U-NOTICES
Prof. A. E. Wood of the sociol-
ogy department, will address
the class on International Rela-
tions of the Cosmopolitan club
at 7:30 o'clock Saturday night in
room 205, University hall.
Cosmopolitan club will meet
at 7:30 tonight in room 205,
University hall.
Officersof the literary class
of 1921 are to have their pic-
tures taken immediately at
White's studio. For information
call the president at 1644-M.
There will be dancing at the
Union tonight.
There will be a meeting of
theoratorical board Monday aft-
ernoon at 4:30 o'clock in room
303, 1Mason hall, to elect a presi-
dent and executive committee,
There will be a meeting of
of the Bayonne, New Jersey,
club at 2 o'clock today at the
Y. M. C. A.

A social will be held at 7:30
o'clock this evening at the Uni-
tarian church.
A party is to be given at 7:30
o'clock tonight'at the First Bapt-
ist church. All students, S. A.
T. C., and naval unit men are
invited. .
There will be a student so-
cial at 8 o'clock this evening
in the social room of the First
Congregational church.
The Upper Room Bible class
meets at 7 o'clock tonight at 444
South State street.

After his address, Colonel Vaughan
showed some scientific films which he
had obtained from the Army Medical
museum. The first pictured in a dia-
grammatic way the mitosis of animal
cells. Another film concerned vene-
real diseases. In closing, there was
shown a strikingly clear, picture of a
tendon transplantation.
Health of Army Excellent Says Gorgas
Washington, Dec. 6.-The health of
the American army, both at home and
overseas, has been excellent, and the
mortality rate- from disease probably
lower than in any similar body of
troops in the history of warfare, Sur-
geon-General C. Gorgas declared in
his annual report made public to-
day. Complete statistics of deaths in
army camps are not included in the
report which covers only the fiscal
year to June 30, 1918.
16,000 Casualties Unreported
Washington, Dec. 6.-The war de-
partment announced today that 16,-
000 major casualties, including kilied
in action, died of wounds, died of
disease, or other causes, severely
wounded and missing, have not yet
been finally reported to next of kin.
Errors in minor casualties are much
larger, it was added.

r

FRENCH TRAIN WRECK KILLS
12; MANY RECEIVE INJURIES
Orleans, France, Dec. 6.-(By Havas
Agency).-An express from Orleans
last night crashed into and telescoped
another train loaded with American
materialat Meung-sur-Lorre, 11 miles
southwest of 'this city. Twelve bodies
have been removed from the wreck
and identified. Other dead still re-
main in the debris. Twenty-five per-
sons were injured. Four of the rail-
road cars were smashed to bits.
Wisconsin students are planning to
build a memorial to express their
gratitude to Badger students who
have been killed in France.

S.A. T.

TAKE

ONE

HOME

LYNDON, Photographer
7i9 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.

I

BUY

1.

Leather and Brass Gifts

C.

For.Christmas

Anyone in Ann Arbor who
holds an account against the S.
A. T. C. regiment as a whole
or against any company will
please send it in immediately
to the adjutant, Lieutenant
Montague, at army headquarters.
This does not include accounts
for supplies which are in 'pro-
cess of payment on government
vouchers.
Professor Theodore Reinach, mem-
ber of the French Educational com-
mission, who spoke here last week,
delivered an address at the University
of Wisconsin Thursday

Don't Forget Your Company Picture

BUY THEM IN ANN ARBOR

We have a very complete assortment featuring
good taste in every article. Inspect them your-
self.

Copyright 1918 Hart Schaffner & Mkt
HART SC.HAFFNER & MARX
Clothes Are Lolver Priced
2aecause you get more Ivear and satisfaction for every dollar
you inbest in them than you crn from any other line
REULE, CONLIN & FIEGEL
Home of Hart Schaffner $ Marx Clothing
Southwest Corner of -.ain and Washington Streets
rb a, 1Rubi
Inc.
Footwear of Quality and Distinction
For Men and Women
IN DETROIT IN ANN ARBOR
101 WASHINGTON BLVD. 12 NICKELS ARCADE

GIFTS IN BRASS

Beautiful

Massive
Both plain and

Useful
rich in design

Durable

STANDING CALENDARS
CALENDARS
ASH TRAYS
SMOKERS' SETS
BOOK RACKS
BOOK ENDS
PAPER KNIVES

NECKTIE HOLDERS
PEN WIPERS
PAPER WEIGHTS
DESK SETS
INK STANDS
OTHER ARTICLES

GIFTS IN LEATHER

Genuine

Well Made

Attractive

Names marked on all goods free of charge

HAND BAGS
BILL FOLDERS
CARD CAS
CIGAR CASES
COLLAR BAGS
"M" BOOKS

TOILET SETS
MANICURE SETS
PLAYING CARD SETS
PARTY CASES
MUSIC ROLLS
DIARIES

BUY YOUR GIFTS IN ANN ARBOR
YOUR FRIENDS WILL THINK MORE OF THEM
BIie Atayer-mSchairer Co.

STATIONERS, PRINTERS, BINDERS
and caterers to the student body

112 S. MAIN STREET

TELEPHONE 1404

-I-

I

a

ii

p

- THE

LARGEST

AND

BEST

INLANDER

- 25c

TICLES BY

Theodore Roosevelt
Frontispiece of Admiral
errs and Lieutenant Boak

ON SALE THIS NOON AT
ANY BOOKSTORE and SOUTH U. CANTEEN
SPECIAL CHRISTMAS NUMBER

What is a Receivingship?
An Entailed Tall of
Christmastide
The Alien Strain

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan