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December 05, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-05

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY FAIR
TODAI

4Iati

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 56. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1918. PRICE THREE CEN

DEMOBILIATION Of
S. A.~T. C UNITS
S 1
PROCEEDS RAIDLY
PHYSICAL TESTS GIVEN ENTIRE
COMPANY OF SECTION B
ON FIRST DAY
ENGINEERING RESERVES
TO TAKE EXAMINATIONS
Guns and Khaki Uniforms Are Being
Turned in as Release Papers
Are Filled Out
Examination of men in the S. A.
T. C. prior to their. discharge was
started yesterday, when the entire
first company of section B were sub-
jected to a physical test. None of
these have received their discharges
as yet, but will be given them either
today or tomoryow.
The work was done on the fourth
floor of the Natural Science building
and occupied most of the day. The
progress made was quite satisfac-
tory, it was stated at headquarters,'
and it is believed that judging from,
the total on the first day, when the
methods of passing the men being ex-
amined is systematized, from 250 to
g00 can be run through in a day. Ma-
jor Roscoe C. Hubbard of the medi-
cal division of the army is in charge
of the work and he is assisted by nine
medical officers. A clerical force of
about 40 men will be used in mak-
ing out the discharges.
Section A Prepares
The companies of section A are
beginning to turn in their guns as a
preparatory mleasure. Also they are
filing out some of the papers that
must be turned in before they leave.
Before being discharged all men are
to h~an4 in their khai ,unif ors and
winl be Issued in return an .0. _ D.
woolen one to wear until they put on
citizens clothes. A sufficient number
of these uniforms is now on hand at
the quartermaster's department to
supply everyone in the unit.
No Word About Engineers
Word has been received at the of-
en their exams with the rest of the
S. A. T. C, according to a statement
goveivt at headquarters, but definite
instructions as to their ultimate dis-
position have not been received as
yet. Major Ralph ii. Durlree express-
ed the opinion that they will proba-
bly be discharged along with the other
boys, .
Plans for Fraternity Houses
Word has been received at the of-
11ce of the Secretary of the University
to the effect that the temporary
buildings which have been put up
around the. campus for the use of the
army must not be torn down until
positive word is sent from Washing-
ton. Nothing, however, was stated
concerning the return of the frater-
nity houses, so they will be given
back as has been planned. The Uni-
versity expects to obtain a schedule
from the military authorities as to the
exact time when each fraternity house
will be vacated so that the work of
fixing them :up can be planned ac-
cordingly. It is expected, that all of
them will be ready for occupation aft-
er the Christmas recess.
UNION HAS LARGE AMOUNT OF
STORED FOOD TO DISPOSE OF

It is expected that not much diffi-
culty will be encoantered in dispos-
ing of the food for the S. A. T. C.
which is now at the Union. Either
the government will take it or the
Union may keep it for its dining
room, During the month of October
the boys consumed $11,015 worth of
bananas, $7,300 worth of bread, and
$5,000 worth of mill.
Anyone in Ann Arbor who
hp dg 4n accpunt against the S.
A. T. d. regiment as a whole
or ggginst any company will
please send it in immediately
tp the adjutant, Lieutenant
Montague, at army headquarters.
This does not include accounts
for supplies which are in pro-
cess of payment on government
vouchers.

i

U.W.W. CAMPAIGN
TOTALS $18;654-65
The final report of the campus
United War Work campaign is now
computed. The women of the Uni-
versity pledged $4,471.72; the civilian
men, $3,573.89; the naval unit, $821,
and the S. A. T. C. $8,271.07. The "fill
the flag" at the Syracuse game
brought $385.66, and at the M. A. C.
game netted $1,144.31, making a to-
tal of $18,654.65.
The enrollment of the S. A. T. C.
was 3,100; of civilians, 1,072, and of
women 1,025. Co. 5 of the S. A. T.
C. whose quota was $1,247.50, gave
the largest amount among the mili-
tary units. Co. 12, with $791.50, was
the next in line.
GOTERMENT SANTIONS
BIG LEAGUEBASEBALL

r f
1
T
.

i

PROF. TAN TYNE SAYS
LEAGUE IS DIFFICULT
COMPARES UNDERTAKING TO
PROJECT OF EARLY COLONIES
IN AMERICA

NATIONAL LEAGUE TO HOLD
MEETING IN NEW YORK -
ON DEC. 10

(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Dec. 4.-The positive an-
nouncement that professional baseball
would be resumed next season with
government sanction was made by
President Ban Jobson of the Amer-
ican league tonight.
President Johnson's announcement
was made after he had received a let-
ter from General March, chief of staff
of the army, who had advised the war
department that under present condi-
tions he could see no reasons why the
game should not be resumed,
President Johnson said that the
stars of baseball who joined the serv-
ice, among them Ty Cobb, Pitcher
Alexander, Denny Kauff, Hank Gow-
dy, and others, would likely be
among the first to receive their dis-
charge so they would be able to join
their clubs on the spring training
trips.
Definite plans for the resumption
of the game will be made at the an-
nual meetings of the major leagues
this month. The National league will
hold its sessions in New York on
Dec. 10 and the American league will
probably convene in Chicago two
days later,
INCREASED ENTERTAINMENT
FOR MEN OF MILITARY UNITS
Increased entertainment for the
men of the S. A. T. C. and naval units
is the present plan of the army Y.
M. C. A One feature is the doubling
of the present film service. Mr. F. C.
Stiffler of the army Y. M. C. A. stated
that through the aid of Major Dur-
kee, a weekly news feature will be
added to the usual five reel picture
given on Wednesday and Saturday
evening
In addition short pictures will be
run Monday and Thursday afternoons
at 4:45 at Lane and Newberry halls.
These will begin tomorrow.
The feature to be released at Lane
hall tomorrow is entitled, "Easy
Street," and "Some Job" will be
shown at Newberry.
EARTHQUAKE DESTROYS CHILEAN
TOWN AND WRECKS ANOTHER
Santiago, Chile, Dec. 4.-An earth-
quake has occurred in northern Chile.
In the towns of Copoapo and Vallenare
important damaggs were caused. In
other localities damage of minor im-
portance resulted.
Reports received here say that the
earthquake destroyed Vallenare and
that it wrecked 10 per cent of the
buildings at Copiapo.
Details concerning the earthquake
in the outlying districts are lacking,
owing to interrupted telegraphic conm
munications. It is said that the shoc
was felt across the continent to the
Atlantic.
PRESIDENT WILSON PARDQN
TWO ACCUSED ARMY OFFICES
Washington, Dec. 4. - Lieut.-Cols.
J. G. Vincent and George W. Mixter,
army oicierh named by Charles H.
Hughes in his report on the air craft
investigation as having been guilty
in transacting business with private
concerns in which they were finan-
cially interested, have been pardon-
ed by President Wilson. This an-
nouncement was made at the White
House.

In discussing the American Articles
of Confederation with the class in
American Constitutional history yes-
terday, Prof. Claude H. Van Tyne
drew a direct analogy between this
early attempt at confederated unity
and the contemplated League of Na-
tions. Although the early articles
were faulty and unsuccessful, he said,
they were by far the most advanced
documents of the time.
He attributed their success to the
fact that the- states were welded to-
gether by a common cause, a similar-
ity of nationality, of language, ideals,
and political thinking. The League
of Nations will try to accomplish the
same ideal as the confederation, ac-
cording to Professor Van Tyne, for it
will be an attempt to cement the na-
tions together in a league of friend-
ship, to keep them from making war
on each other without the common
consent of all the others, and to al-
low no nation to become militaris-
tic. They aim to have a common po-
lice system, just as the early states
had militias.
Nations Lack Homogenity
However, the nations will not have
the advantage of homogenity, as did
the early states. They are different
in nationality, ideals, and political
thinking. "The antipathies of the
past," said Professor Van Tyne, "will
interfere with their working togeth-
er. We can't keep some nations from
growing and others from decaying.
There are 1,000 forces working to-
ward the destruction of a league of
nations. It is the most tremendous
task statesmen have ever under-
taken.
Must Have Common Ilea
People'deaim that' .v"WvilT'°"e liv
1ing, inside of a year, under some un-
usual organization dictated by this
league, but it will meet all the dif-
ference between parts of the world,
and between groups of men," he con-
cluded,''"and we can only believe that
it may unite us, the nations, as the
early confederation united our coun-
try, in a common ideal."
AUSTRIA ASKS FOR
JUSTICE AT PARIS
(By Associated Press)
Vienna, Dec. 3 (delayed).-Doctor
Franz Klein, former minister of jus-
tice, who will represent Austria at the
peace conference, said to the corre-
spondent today:
"If we are permitted to attend the
peace conference I presume it mere-
ly will be to receive its mandates, al-
though we trust we will be heard.
"It is to be hoped that the confer-
ence will arrive at a solution satis-
factory to all the new republics of
the empire so that we may be able to
live peacefully in the future. We feel
that the Americans surely will be
fair.
"You may say that the Austrian re-
public certainly wants no more wars
and has no ambition other than to
live."
FOR1ER DAILY EDITOR SPENDS
FURLOUGH VISITING IN CITY
Robert T. McDonald, '18, manag-
ing editor of the Daily last year, is
spending a few days in Ann Arbor.
McDonald had just eompleted the
ground school in naval aviation at
Massachusetts Institute of Technola-
gy at Cambridge at the tie the arm-
istice was signed. He entered the
training school about the first week
of August and the men in this class
were given the option of waiting un-
til a place was open In the flying
school or receiving their discharges.

McDonald chose the latter. He is now
on leave of absence until he receives
his official discharge.
IMPERSONATING OFFICERS NETS
LIQUOR SUPPLY FOR THIRSTY

REP, C, GLSS TAKES
MC ADDO'S POSITION
PRESIDENT WILSON APPOINTS
NO DIRECTOR GENERAL
OF RAILROADS
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec 4.-Representative
Carter Glass, of Virginia, chairman
of the house banking and currency
committee, is understood to have been
offered the post of secretary of the
treasury by President Wilson, and his
nomination is expected to go to the
senate immediately if he decides to
accept.
Members of the house said today
that Mr. Glass' reluctance to surren-
der the seat in congress, to which he
has just been re-elected after 18 years
of service, was the only consideration
holding up the appointment. Mr. Glass
,himself would not talk further than
to say that he was not ready to make
any statement.
The understanding, both at the
capitol and in official circles gener-
ally is that President Wilson had the
nomination prepared last night after
a conference with Mr. Glass.
Secretary McAdoo's resignation as
treasurer will take effect upon the
appointment of his successor. He con-
tinues as director of railroads until
Jan. 1, or until.a successor is nam-
ed. The indications now are that a
new director general will not be
named immediately.
MONTENEGRO UNITES
THREE SERB RACES
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 4.-The Serbian
legation here was advised officially
here that King Nicholas, of Montene-
gro, had been deposed by the Mon-
tenegrin national assembly.
The dispatch says the' dynasty of
the Karageorgevitch of Serbia was
elected to be the national dynasty for
the kingdom of Montenegro, thus unit-
ing for these states, which are inhab-
ited by the Serb race, into one, so
that they will enter together into the
common state of all Serbs, Croats, and
Slovenes, which, will be formed. in
the union of the territories of the
former Austro-Hungarian empire.
The national council, which will
be responsible for all the formali-
ties and details of execution in the
unification of Serbia and Montenegro,
was elected. The dispatch adds that
the population has hailed the decision
of the national ass'embly with enthu-
siasm and with a firm faith in a bet-
ter future.
PRINTING PLANT AND BINDERY
TO MOVE FROM OLD QUARTERS
The University printing plant and
bindery are being moved into their
new quarters this week, in the north-
east corner of the basement of 'the
new Library building. Theywill prob-
ably be ready for use by the first of
the year.
The bindery was formerly located in
the basement of the east stacks and
the printing shop was in the base-
ment of the Economics building.
GIRLS WHO REMAIN IN TOWN
XMAS WEEK ENTERTAINED
An effort is being made through the
neighborhood groups of houses to en-

tertain the girls not living in the
larger organized houses at a Christ-
mas party some time before the holi-
day vacation. Martha Cook building,
Newberry, and Alumnae houses have
already agreed to hold entertain-
ments.
Masques Vote in 22 at Last Meeting
Masques at their last meeting held
membership election. Many girls who
were unable to attend the initial try-
outs will be given the opportunity at
the beginning of the second semes-
ter. Those elected to membership
were the following: Helen Cady, E.
Bullock, F. Stephens, Bertral Sum-
mers, Isabel Kemp, Hilde Hagerty,
Bertha Wright, Mary Overmann, Ede-
lain Roden, Winona Beckley, Mildred
Reindel, Isabel Swan, Jean MacPher-
son, Ina McGurk, Florence Howell,
Elizabeth Oakes, K. Turrah, Ann
Mitchel, Lucille Myers, Marion Esther
Keeler, and Harriet Quati.

SENIOR LIT
IELECTS

CLASS
OFFICERS

L. Albert Lundquist was elected to
the presidency'of the senior literary
class at a meeting yesterday in the
auditorium of University hall.
Emma Riggs is the new vice-presi-
dent and Emily Powell was chosen
for the class secretary. George Berg
is treasurer.
The newly elected president an-
nounced that the class committees
would be finally decided upon by Sat-
urday. Feature elections such as
choosing the most popular lady, the
most popular man, the handsomest
man and prettiest girl, the best stu-
dent, the greasiest grind and others
were on the program of the after-
noon.
MANY MEN-EXPECTED TO
RETURN AFTERDISCHAUGE
LETTERS RECEIVED DAILY FROM
MEN IN SERVICE BY DEANS
OF VARIOUS COLLEGES
Deans of the various schools and
colleges are of the opinon that many
former students will return as soon
as they have secured their discharge
from service. The belief is verified
by the fact that many men now in
s.ervice are sending in queries re-
garding their standings in order to
secure an early release.
According to the war department
the grade given these students for
credit granted for work in officers'
training camps and similar work will
depend upon the student's under-
graduate status. This is different
from the usual method of grading ad-
vanced credit which is usually rated
at "C" work.
It is thought that the men that will
return to Michigan will be in suf-
ficient numbers to more than fill the
vacancies made by the S. A. T. C.
and naval unit men who are leaving.
Many of the men will be able to re-
turn the second semester if the plans
for early demobilization are carried
out as anticipated at present.
Mr. L. L. Forsythe, principal of the
Ann Arbor high school, has received
communications from many former
high school students regarding their
return to school as soon as they are
able to do so. Many of these men
desire statements to the effect that
they are qualified and wish to return
to school in order to hasten their re-
lease.
Genius Plentiful
in Xmas In lander
Michigan's literary genius will be
brought to light in the Christmas
number of the Inlander, which will
appear Saturday morning, Dec. 7,
according to one of the editors, Bur-
ton Garlinghouse. The main feature
of the number is a story by Adelaide
Adams, entitled, "Allen Strain." It
is a story of German-Amernicas.
There will also be other stories. The
photographs of Admiral Berry ard
Lieutenant Boaks will grace the tie
page. It promises to be one of the
largestrissues of the Inlanderspub-
ished in recent years.
Accident May End Actor's Career
New York, Dec. 4. - Nat Goodwin,
the well known actor, because of the
loss of one of his eyes may never
again appear on the stage. While
playing a month ago in Kansas City

in "Why Marry" Mr. Goodwin used
chloroform liniment as an eye wash
by mistake. As the company was
playing short engagements the eye
did not receive the attention its con-
dition demanded. Last Saturday Mr.
Goodwin was forced to go to the hos-
pital, where an operation was per-
formed.
Hospital Nurse Dies from Infldenza
One of the latest victims of the in-
fluenza epidemic is Sylvia Duvall,
'19. Miss Duvall was a nurse in the
University hospital during the recent
epidemic and contracted the disease
then. Two of her classmates accom-
panied her to her home in Monroe,
Mich., where she passed away early
yesterday morning.

WILSON SAILS ON
GERMAN VESSEL
fORFEC O

PRESIDENT PLANS TO ABOLISH
MILITARISM AND ATTAN
JUST WORLD PEACE
WOUNDED YANKEES ON
LAPLAND CHEER PARTY
Prominent Names on Delegation List;
U. S. NavyConvoy Escorts Ship
Out of Port
(By Associated Press)
New York, Dec. 4.-Bound on a mis-
sion, the principle objects of which
are the abolition of militarism and the
attainment of a just world peace,
Woodrow Wilson, first president of
the United States to visit Europe
while in office, was tonight speeding
across the Atlantic toward France to
attend the greatest international con-
ference in history.
On the transport George Washing-
ton, one time German passenger liner,
manned by a navy crew, With deck
guns manned for action, and accom-
panied by a navy convoy, the Presi-
dent left New York harbor amid a
demonstration without parallel in the
history of the port.
New York Gives Big Send Off
The President took his place on the
flying bridge as the great ship moved
down the bay. River d aft and ships
of many nations dipped flags and toot-
ed whistles, and thousands of persons
bade him "god speed" in- cheers and
flag waving from skyscrapers and
piers.
Off quarantine, where Staten Island
throngs waved and shouted a second
farewell, and monitors, gun boats, a2d
artillerymen, at Fort Hamilton, jqj-
ed in saluting gun fire, the George
Washington met its ocean convoy-
the superdreadnaught Pnnsylvania,
and a quintet of destroyers.
With her official convoy and 10 pth-
er dlestroyers, which joined the fleet
for a cruise to the limit of American
territorial waters, the George Wash-
ington disappeared over the eastern
horizon shortly after noon. Mr. Wil-
son left his native shores, according
to persons who conferred with him be-
fore the George Washington sailed,
determined against militarism in any
form. He feels that the crushing of
Prussian militarism is part of his plan
for the future peace of the world, these
informants said.
Returning Yanks Cheer Wilson
In emphasis, it seemed, of America's
part in bringing about Germany's
downfall, the presidential party, out-
bound, met some of the American
hosts returning from overseas. Two
thousand home coming aviation troops
on the Ireland cheered the George
Washington as she left her pier, and
outside quarantine the Minnekahda
was sighted, steaming up. the harbor
with more than 3,000 soldiers as pass-
engers
In command of Admiral Mayo the
peace squadron is heading, it is un-
derstood, for Brest, an American de-
barkation port in France. The date
of its arrival is uncertain but a quick
passage is not required as ample time
remains for conferences, preliminary
to the peace congress.
French Boats to Meet President
Off the French coast the President
will be met by a squadron of Amer-
ican ships. French, Italian, and Brit-
ish also, it is expected, will join in
the greetings which will be followed
by a succession of official ceremonies
marking progress of the American ex-
ecutive to Paris, to the war front and
presumeably to the capitals of Great
Britain, Belgium and Italy. The lin-
er's passenger list contains a group
of prominent names without parallel,
probably, within any single voyage in
the annals of shipping.
(Continued on Page Four)

Tryouts are wanted for the
editorial and business staffs of
The Michigan Daily. S. A. T. C.
and naval unit men who wish
to try out after demobilization
are asked to come in and regis-
ter. Business tryouts apply aft-
er 5 o'clock in the afternoon
and editorial between 1 and 4
o'clock.

Lansing (Correspondence the Asso-
ciated Press).-Among the many ways
the liquor hungry of dry Michigan
have taken to secure supplies of the
:prohibited alcoholic beverages they
crave is that of impersonating offi-
cers.-

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