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December 04, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-04

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THE WE.ATI
CLOIJDY; PROB.
SNOW

YHER
CABLY

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~1Iai1j

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

I-

I

VOL. XXIX. No. 55. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1918. PRICE THREE CE

RESENTSAHRRANGE
PLAN FOR PAYING
TUITION B REEK

SERVICE MEN REMAINING
COLLEGE NEED NOT PAY
FULL TUITION

ATI

SENIORS TO HOLD
CLASS ELECTIONS
Senior literary class elections will
be held at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon
in University hall.
The meeting, which was scheduled
for Tuesday afternoon, was postpon-
ed due to the small attendance. All
class officers will be chosen at this
final assembly, and arrangements will
be made for the representation of the
class in the 1919 Michiganensian.
The class at this time also will vote
upon the select group that is com-
posed of the prettiest, the most pop-
ular, the jolliest, and the most stu-
dious in the senior literary class.
LOR CHARNWOOD TALKS
'BOUT IRISH QUESTION

REGULAR FEES TO COME
BACK SECOND SEMESTER

Time for Paying Fees May
tended Where Immediate
ment is Impossible

Be Ex-
Pay-

Students honorably discharged
from the S. A. T. C., naval unit, or
other branches of the military or
naval service who decide to remain in
school for the rest of the semester,
will not be required to pay full tui-
tion. This is a concession on the part
of the Regents, because heretofore all
students entering late have had to pay
the full amount.
Charge to Be Made By Wkeeks
,According to the decision of the
executive and finance committee of
the Regents.
"The annual fee in each of the sev-
eral school and colleges will be pro-
rated on the weekly basis, 36 weeks to
the year. The registering students
will be charged for the remaining
weeks of the University year, count-
ing from the beginning of the week of
registration plus the proper matricu-
lation fee in the case of students who
have not previously paid same,"
That is, the regular fee will be di-
vided by six and this amount will be
vided by six and this amount will be
charged for each week of the remain-
ipg time.
"Registrations are not to be accept-
d during the last two weeks of the
first semester except for the second
semester.
"No laboratory fees will be charg-
ed such students for the remaining
weeks of the first semester.
Regular Fees Next Semester
"Beginning with the second semes-
ter regular fees, including laboratory
fees, are to be charged all students as
provided in the catalogue. Charges
herein provided are to apply only to
students now in service; for all oth-
er students, registration fees will, at
all times during the year, be on the
regular basis as provided in the cata-
logue.
"All refunds during the remainder
of this year to these students will be
in accordance with the spirit of the
above regulations.
Can Extend Time to Pay Fees
In the case of S. A. T. C.tstudents
or naval unit students of this Uni-
versity who continue their studies
-without break and who satisfy the
University treasurer that they are not
financially able to pay the required
fees at once, an extension of time may
be arranged in individual cases, post-
poning payment of fees until - the
opening of the University exercises
after the holiday vacation, Jan. 7."
+ This ruling also affects "all meP or
women in Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A.,
K. of C., Red Cross or other organ-
ized service, with status comparable
to that of enlisted men.",
REORGANIZATION OF
VARSITY BAND SURE
Michigan's Varsity band will be re-
organized immediately after the de-
mobilization of the S. A. T. C., accord-
ing to Prof. John R. Brumm, faculty
manager of the band. Many of the
members of the S A. T. C. and the
naval unit bands, which are to be dis-
banded, will make up the Varsity.
Mr. Wilfred Wilson, former director
of the University band and at pres-
ent in charge of the military bands,
will again take the directorship. It
is expected that the band will be com-
posed of about 60 men. "There is no
reason why the Varsity band this year
should not be as large as in former
years," says Professor Brumm.
An entertainment will probably be
given sometime during the second
semester in order to raise a fund
from which to pay those members who

remain at the University for the June
commencement. This has been the

PROBLEM OF HOME
IRELAND ARISES
WAR OVER

RULE
WITH

IN

"The settlement of the Irish ques-
tion will depend and be based upon
the agreement the people of Ireland
make among themselves," said Lord
sharnwood in his lecture yesterday
on "English Domestic Problems Aris-
ing from the War."
Lord Charnwood stated that he fav-
ored any development of self-govern-
ment which would satisfy the Irish
people. The unrest is caused mainly
by historical actions, influence from
without, and the fact that the bulk of
the population is dominated by Ro-
man Catholicism. "The descendants
of the Irish people do not know the
Ireland as it exists today," he added.
"Irish sentiment of those living out-
side the island," said Lord Charn-
wood, "has somewhat of a distorted
aspect towards England. The advance
in prosperity with the aid of English
and Irish legislation, has been more
rapid than any other country of Eu-
rope. Yet it has been dmemonstrated
by the experience of Englishmen
Scotchmen, and others that they are
unable to understand the Irish pro-
blem, and neither can the people of
Ireland itself solve it.
Home Rule Nat Yet Granted
"In 1914, England put a mqasure
on the statute books for home rule in
Ireland, but it has not yet been
granted. If it had been given then, a
civil war would have resulted on the
island. Such a war would have torn
England as well as Ireland into dis-
union."
Lord Charwood said that the actions
during the war, of those living in cer-
tain sections have resulted in separ-
ating England and Ireland farther
apart. He believes that the question
of self-government for Ireland is an
impractical one, for the present at
least.
England a Socialism Center
In discussing the English labor
problems, Lord Charnwood stated
that England being a great industrial
country makes her a center for so-
cialism. England has experimented
with the problem of minimum wage,
and will press it into use more widely
now that the war is over. The major-
ity of the English people favor the
state ownership of the larger indus-
tries. England is going to have a
great movement in the housing of the
working classes, and such advance-
ments as the granting of pensions to
the soldiers are also to be made.
"England is making great strides
on the question of education," he
said. "Elementary schools are to be
given closer attention and the work-
ing man is to receive a better chance
along the educational lines."k
Lord Charnwood closed his talk
by stating his view of what we mean
by democracy. "The real ideal of
government," he said, "is one in
which the superiors and the more ed-
ucated will give themselves to the
service of the people, thought to
thought, and heart to heart. The rul-
ers must act as to the aspirations of
tLe masses, and in the spirit of Chris-
tianty."
Organizations and classes
have been given until the end
of this week to get in their
Michiganensila copy. An unex-
pected delay made this extra
time possible. Absolutely noth-
ing with be accepted after Sat-
urday.

MEN MAY DEPART
AFTER EAMINATIN
Medical Officers to Start Working on
Section B Men This Morn-
ing
385 NAVAL UNIT MEN PUT N
APPLICATIONS FOR RELEASES
S. A .T C .men will receive their
discharges immediately after being
physically examined and will be free
to leave town the same day if they
wish, according to a statement from
military headquarters yesterday.
Physical Exams Begin Today
Physical examinations of men in
section B will begin this morning in
rooms on the fourth floor of the Nat-
ural Science building. Major Roscoe
C. Hubbard, a medical officer detailed
here especially for this work will be
in charge., He will be aided by two
other medical officers. A number of
men from headquarters have been de-
tailed to handle the clerical part of
the work and it is expected bythose
in charge that the examining of the
men will progress rapidly. Many
men of this section will be free to go
home tonight.
Men in section A who wish to leave
college mas make application to their
company commanders and will be ex-
amined before the other men in the
section. The men in section A will
receive their discharges within a day
or two after having their examina-
tions.
385 Apply for Navy Release
Three hundred eighty-five men of
the naval unit had applied to head-
quarters for release from active duty
up to 5 o'clock yesterday. These ap-
Ilications will be sent to Great Lakes
aval training station for approval
by Captain Moffet, commandant of the
station and 7in harge of this naval
district.
As fast as the approved applications
are returned the naval unit men will
be released from active duty and the
naval authorities here expect that all
the men who wish will be placed on
inactive duty before Christmas.
Gargoyle Plans
Big Circulation
Several new policies were adopted
at a meeting of the Gargoyle staff,
held Tuesday afternoon in the Press
building. An effort will be made to
enlist the co-operation of the alumni
of the University. Personal letters are
to be sent to each of the former stu-
dents subscribing to the Alumnus, to
all who have made donations to the
Michigan Union, and to all who have
shown an interest in the University
in other ways. It is hoped that many
subscriptions will be received from
them and through the returns secured
from the increased circulation, a
larger and better Gargoyle will be
produced.
Another of the new policies inaug-
urated was the appointing of a wom-
an to the business staff of the publi-
cation. Miss Margaret Spaulding,
'22, is the second woman to hold a
position on the ad. getting side of the
University's funny magazine, since
that publication has been founded.
Miss Marjory Van Zandt, '19, appoint-
ed at the beginning of the present

year, was the first to receive the hon-
or. The lack of men with ability has
necessitated this action, and one of the
most staunch of publication traditions
has, seemingly, been done away with.
Other appointments to the business
staff made at this time were Sidney
Sarason, '22, and Milton Geige, '22.
The present staff now consists of Wal-
ter Reiss, '21L, business manager;
Wiliam Angell, '21, publication mana-
ger; William Fortune, '20, assistant
circulation manager, Miss Marjory
Van Zandt, '21; Miss Margaret Spauld-
ing, '22, Sidney Sarason, '22; and Mil-
ton Geige, '22.
For the first time in the history of
the Gargoyle a faculty man is the
managing editor of the magazine. Ed-
ward Everett of the Rhetoric depart-
ment was called upon to take the place
of Roy Fricken when he left the Uni-
versity just before the first issue was,
off the press.

AMERICA TO SEND
TONS OF EVIDENCE
(By Associated Press)
dence of the preparedness of the
dence ,of the preparedness of the
American government to entei into
peace negotiations was given tonight
in an announcement that an advis-
ory commission of 23 experts, who
have made a year's study of political
and economic conditions in Europe
and Asia, will sail with President Wil-
son- and his fellow delegates on the
George Washington.
With them will go several tons of
maps and records, together with other
documents of evidence in Paris or on
the way, ,comprised of a collection of
international data, said to be without
parallel in history.
WILSON LEAYE5 TODAY
FOR PEACE CONCLAE
PRESIDENT APPOINTS M'AD00'S
SUCCESSORATO U. S.
TREASURY
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 3.- Just before
President Wilson left Washington to-
night enroute to Europe an announce-
ment was made of the appointment of
the treasurer to succeed William G.
McAdoo. His name will be made public
tomorrow in New York. There was
no reference to the director-general
of railroads, and it is inferred that
this official is not yet determined up-
on.
Crosses Ocean on Hun Liner
Washington, Dec. 3.-President Wil-
son tonight began his trip to Europe
to the peace conference. The Presi-
dent left on a special train to New
York where he will board the George
Washington, on which the voyage
across the Atlantic will be made.
No announcements were made as
to the President's itinerary, but it was
understood that the George Washing-
ton would steam from New York with
her naval convoy, sometime tomor-
row. About seven days will be re-
quired for the trip, and the ship will
dock at a French port, presumably
Brest.
Wilson to Be Absent 6 Weeks
The President does not expect to be
abroad for more than six weeks, which
would give him just a month on Eu-
ropean soil. Before the peace confer-
ence meets he will confer with Pre-
miers Lloyd George, of Great Britain,
Clemanceau, of France, and Orlando,
of Italy, and probably with King Al-
bert, of Belgium, to discuss the salient
points of the peace treaty.
While in Europe, Mr. Wilson plans
to visit England and Italy, as well as
France. He also may go to Brussels.
He also is understood to intend to
make a prilgrimage to some of the
battlefields in France. Great prepar-
ations have been made in London,
Paris, and Rome, for the President's
reception.
Joseph P. Tumulty, the President's
secretary, accompanied Mr. Wilson to
New York, but will not go abroad. He
will return to Washington to conduct
the business of the White House.
Save Your oney
ICircus Day Soon
Hear ye-Hear ye-all ye who are

fond of red lemonade and the tight
wire. The Women's league celebrat-
ed circus is coming. Posters are all
about town with photographs of the
world's only nonsensical clowns and
of the only colored mule in captiv-
ity.
The advance agents say that the cir-
cus train will arrive at 2 o'clock on
Friday afternoon and the parade will
start promptly at 3 o'clock from Bar-
bour gymnasium. They also say that
because of the cessation of the war
the circus this year will be embellish-
ed with brand new side-shows, for-
tune tellers imported from the orient
and stunts introduced from the Fiji
islands, stunts hitherto unimaginable
in this hemisphere. The advance
agents furthermore have announced
another ovation namely, that all who
have paid the nominal entrance ad-
mission of 10 cents will be given a
place in the big procession, and so
all are urged to come in fancy at-
tire. ,' ;*

JEWISH STUDENTS
TO HAVE MEETING
The Jewish Student Congregation
will hold its first service of the year
Suxday afternoon in Lane' hall. Dr.
Lee M. Franklin, supervising Rabbi
of the congregation, will address the
Jewish young men and women on a
topic of the day. A. J. Gornetzky,
'19L, president, and the executive
board have arranged, besides this ad-
dress a special program in the way
of an entertainment similar to that
staged three weeks ago. Invitations
are being sent to all civilian stu-
dents and S. A. T. C. and naval unit
men are being reached through their
respective heads.
SITICI TO RE-REISTE,
PRESIDENTANNOUNCES
ALL MEN ADVISED TO REMAIN
IN COLLEGE TO COMPLETE
COURSES
"The reconstruction period will be
one of the most important in the his-
tory of the world. Problems which
will call for highly trained men and
women will arise and those with a
University training will have a tre-
mendous advantage," President Harry
B. Hutchins declared in addressing the
men of section A, of the S. A. T. C.,
yesterday afternoon in Hill auditor-
lUEm.
'I do not guarantee that if you
have a university education that you
will be preid'ent of the United States;
a governor, or manager of one of the
large business concerns of the coun-
try, but unless you have the educa-
tional foundation which is most eas-
ly acquired in a university, you will
most likely not be among the lead-
ers," the president said.
Urges Remaining in College
He urged the men to remain in col-
lege, telling them that things would
be made as easy as possible for them
to complete their present courses
successfully and called to their minds
that there would be no more of the
duties and compulsory study which
they dislike.
President Hutchins explained to
the men that much of the confusion
at the beginning was caused because
the University knew that a unit of the
S. A. T. C. would be established here
only four weeks previous to the open-
ing of the present school term and
that in the intervening time the Uni-
versity officials had to provide quar-
ters, make arrangements for a mess
hall, revise the curricula, arrange
new courses and hire new instruc-
tors.
He said that, despite the difficulties,
increased by the intensive military
work which the government properly
required that things were so 'right-
ing themselves at the end of the first
month that he was able to send in a
satisfactory report to the govern-
ment.
To Give Credit for Drill
in explaining the new arrangement
he said that to give the men a chance
to complete their college course with-
out taking extra work the faculties of
the several colleges had agreed to
give four hours University credit for
military training to each man who
completes six hours of other work
with a grade of C. "The first semester
will not end until Feb. 7, which is
one week longer than the first semes-
ter has been in ofrmer years," Presi-
dent Hutchins stated. "The time left

will be sufficient to allow any man
who desires to receive at least 10
hours' credit.
"Beware of disgusts, for disgust
has ruined many a man," he said in
closing. "Put the disagreeable things
you have experienced in the last two
months, if there have been any, be-
hind you and start in anew."
Men discharged from the S. A. T.

Heir to'
To

Throne Claims He 14te
Air and Sea Raids, and
French Deportations

WILLING TO RETURN TO WORK
AS LABORER IF NATION
FORMS DEMOCRACY
PRESENT CONFLICT TOO
SOON FOR BOCHE AIMS

CROWN PRINCE FAILS TOSIGN PAPERS;
KAISER'S SON SAYS GERMANYLOST WAR
AFTERl VICTORY Of MARNE BY FRENCI

(By Associated Press)
Oosterland,. Holland Dec. 3. - "I
have not renounced anything and I
have not signed any document what-
ever."
Frederick William Hohenzollern
who claims the title of crown prince
of Germany, thus answered the ques-
tion of the Associated Press in the
course of a lengthy conversation to-
day on the island of Wieyingen, where
he is interned.
Prince Willing to Return
"However," he continued, "should
the German government decide te
form a republic similar to the United
States or France I shall be perfectly
content to return to Germany as a
simple citizen ready to do anything
to assist my country. I should even
be happy to work as a laborer in a
factory.
"At present everything appears to
be chaotic in Germany, but I hope
things will right themselves."
Asked in what in his opinion was
the turning point of the war, he
said:
Huns Lose War at Marne
"I was convinced early in October,
1914, that we had lost the war. I con-
sidered our position hopeless after the
battle of the Marne, which we should
not have lost if the troops of our gen-
eral staff had not suffered a case of
nerves.
"I tried to persuade the general
staff to seek peace then, even at a
great sacrifice, going so far 'as to
give up Alsace-Lorraine. But I was
told to mind my own business and
confine my activities to commanding
mny armies. I have proof of this."
Speaking of the beginning of the
war Frederick William asserted:
"Never Desired , War"
"Contrary to all statements hither-
to made abroad, I never' desired war,
and thought the moment quite inop-
portune. I was never consulted, and
the report about a crown council be-
ing held in Berlin to decide about
the war, I deny on my oath.
"My father, also, I am sure, did
not desire war. If Germany had
sought the best opportunity for mak-
ing war she would have chosen the
period either of the Boer war or the
Russo-Japanese war."
Ludendorf Responsible for Loss
Ludendorf and his staff continually
underestimated the enemy's forces, he
declared, and never believed that
America's contribution of soldiers
was as great as it actually proved
to be.
Frederick William declared himself
to be an admirer of President Wil-
son, whom he felt assured would
bring about a peace of justice for the
German people and concluded:
Germany "Cannot Be Crushed"
"Any humiliation of a nation con-
taining 70,000,000 would leave a feel-
ing of revenge. Such a nation can-
not be crushed.
"The armistice terms are very se-
vere and almost impossible of'execu-
tion, as the Entente powers are tak-
ing away a large portion of the means
of transport."
Asked whether Gerjany, if victo-
rious, would have imposed even more
severe terms, he expressed the belief
that such would not have been the
case.
Prince Opposed Sub Raids
When the Brest-Litovsk treaty was
mentioned he said its terms were
hard because in Russia the Germans
were confronted by the Bolshevik.
With regard to air raids on forti-
fied cities, the fierce submarine war-
fare, the bombardment of Paris and
the deportation of women from the

C. will be obliged to register in the occupied districts to work in
University if they wish to remain many, Frederick said that he ha
as their registering in the fall will ways entirely disagreed with I
not be accepted. policies.

A

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