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December 01, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-01

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW
TODAI

Ar
Irrw
4r ANWUtr t

tilx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRt
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 53.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1918

PRICE THREE CEN

WILSON TH SPEAK
TO JOINT SESSION:
TO SA1ITUELSDAY1
CONGRESS ANXIOUSLY AWAITS,
MESSAGE AS SESSION
OPENS
REPUBLICANS MAY ASK
' FOR EXTRA COMMITTEE

Hundreds of Correspondents
Attaches to Go With
Delegation

ands

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 30. - Never has
an annual address of the President
to congress, been awaited so anxious-
ly as the message to be delivered at
the opening of the winter session
Monday, on the eve before his depart-
ure to Europe to attend the peace
conference.
Many expect to hear something\ of
the American plans at the confer-
ence, as well as an outline of the
executive views on readjusting the
war organized countries to a peace
bais.
Joint Session Monday
Arrangements were made today for
a joint session in the house Monday
at 1 o'clock, after congressional lead-
ers had been notifld that the Presi-
dent had desired to be heard on the
first day instead of the second, in ord-
er to hasten his departure. The ad-
dress will constitute his goodbye to
congress and the people of the Unit-
ed States, for he is expected to sail
Tuesday.
No official comment was forthcom-
ing dtrring the day on the personnel
of the peace conference. No one at-
tempted to say whether the President
would be regarded as a part of the
delegation. Informally it was Indic-
ated at the state department that the
point could not be cleared up, because
of the uncertainty of the course to
be followed by the heads of the as-
sociated governments.
Republicans Want Special Committee
Some hundreds of attaches of the
commission will sail with the Presi-
dent on the steamship George Wash-
ington. The Orizaba, another boat,
leaving New York tomorrow at noon,
will carry several hundred newspaper
correspondents who will report the
proceedings of the conference.
Several Republicans in the senate
discussed introducing a resolution
to send a special committee with the
delegation to keep congress advised
of the proceedings.
American Warships Form Escort
London, Nov. 30.- President Wil-
son, upon reaching European waters,
will be escorted to Brest by American
warships, which will make up a for-
midable array. It is understood that
neither theFrench or British hate been
requested to aid in the naval recep-
tion. The British are discussing plans
to welcome the American President,
should he come here.
Boys of 18 Must Fill Out Blanks
Questionnaires are to be made out
by all registrants 18 years of age.
This order was canceled when the
armistice was signed, but later a new
one was issued ordering all boys 18
yearstof age to fill out questionnaires.
Due to the confusion many did not
make them out. They will be class-
ed as delinquents unless they ans-
wer the prescribed questions, and
mail the papers to their local boards.
I Organizations which have not
sent in copy for the Michigan-
ensian will have a last chance
to bring it in this morning. The
editor will be in the Press
building to receive it.

Miania Kicked Out
of Germania- Cobb
"For valor, courage and gallantry
and all the qualities that make for
splendid soldiers and the unanimous
determination that permeates the
American forces from general to pri-
vate, the sun never shone on the equal
of those following the Stars and
Stripes," said Irvin S. Cobb, last
night at Hill auditorium. "If the late
kaiser hadn't had his psychology on
backwards he never wouldhave
thought in a thousand years that he
could lick such boys.
"And when I think of the ruins
behind and the terror before, the
treaties regarded as pieces of paper,
of Edith Cavell standing before a
firing squad, of the Lusitania and her
burden of helpless women and chil-
dren, and of hundreds of Red Cross
sanctuaries which were consciously
bombed from on high by airplanes, I
say, when I thinly of what they did
do and what they intended to do, my
one regret was then, and is now, that
the pile of German dead was not 10
times as high, long and wide as it
was.
"I am glad that at last we entered
the war, not for selfish motive or
personal gains, without dream of
world power, but rather in order to
make the world a' fit place in which
to live in peace with our neighbors,
in order to kick the mania out of
Germania, and lastly to work a per-
manent and everlasting cure'for that
theory of the 'divine right' of degen-
erate epileptics to rule over human
beings:
"We will not take any territory
from the war except those little green
mounds in France where 50,000 of
our dead are sleeping forever.
"I think I have already discerned
a movement of boasting or optimism
on our part, to think we have won
the great battle and have caused the
foe to surrender before he would if
we had not entered; but let us re-
member that there is a path of 4,000,-
000 dead of the French, British Bel-
gians, and Italians before us. How-
(Continued on Page Six)
t wilight Concert
D-y Music Faculty
Five members of the University
School of Music faculty will partici-
pate in the complimentary twilight
concert to be given at 3 o'clock this
afternoon in Hill auditorium. The
concert is given in co-operation with
the War Camp Community Service.
The following program will be of-
fered, Mrs. George B. Rhead and Dor-
othy Wines acting as accompanists:
Sonate (D major) ..........Handel
Adagio-Allegro
Larghetto-Allegro
Anthony J. Whitmire.
The Grey Wolf............Burleigh
Anna Schram-Imig
Rigaudon, Elegie, Minuet........
.....'' .Rameau-Godowsky
Albert Lockwood.... ...
My Lover He Comes on a Skee..
Clough-Leighton
The Forest of Oaks.....MacFayden
Dawn ......................Curran
Mrs. Imig
Sonata-Fantaisie, Op. 10. Scriabin
Fete-Dien a Seville........Albeniz
Mr. Lockwood
FOOTBALL SCORES

Minnesota 7; Chicago 0.
Great Lakes 27; Purdue 0.
Iowa 0; Camp Dodge 0.
Cleveland naval reserves 10; Pitts-
burg 9.
Syracuse 21; Rutgers 0.
Brown 6; Harvard 3.
Philadelphia navy yards 27; Charles-
ton navy yards 0.
Detroit Eastern 10; Northwest-
ern 0.

UNIVERSITY SCHEDULE CHANGED;
CLASSES MEET HALF HOUR LATER
Classes in all the colleges of the University, beginning to-
morrow morning, will meet half half an hour later, according to
the executive order issued Satur day by President Harry B. Hutch-
ins. Classes will now begin at 8 o'clock and last until 12 o'clock,
and at 1 o'clock until 3 o'clock. This will bring the University
back to the old hours, in use in 1917, before the coming of the R.
O. T. C.
Military and naval authoriti es have issued orders consistent
with this change. The evening s tudy period for the S. A. T. C.
men will be from 6:45 o'clock to 9:30 o'clock. The time given to
military drill will be reduced fr om two hours to one and one-
half hours each day, and the evening study period will be length-
ened three-quarters of an hour.

r-

HEADQUTERS IWITING
CHICAGO INSTRUCTIONS

WOLVERINES TAKE FINAL GAME OF 'i&
SEASON BY WINNING F ROM OHIO STATE
BYTWOT'OGHOWNSIN LAS URE

PLANS

COACH YOST DECLARES GA3
SHOWS FINE POINTS OF
PLAYERS
GOETZ PROVES STAR
OF LAST GRID GAM
Hurry-up Mentor Will Not Claim ]
Ten Title"Because Only a Tilt
With Illinois Can Settle It

FOR DEMOBILIZATION
DELAYED PENDING
ORDERS

No further information concerning
the demobilization of the local S. A.
T. C. will be given out from mili-
tary headquarters of the local unit
until Lieutenant Crawford and Lieu-
tenant Sayres, personnel adjutants of
section A, and Lieutenant Walters of
section B, return from Chicago, where
they were called to receive full in-
structions and all forms pertaining
to the discharge of the men.
Plans are going forward at local
headquarters, but nothing could be
given for publication as instructions,
which 'the personnel adjutants will
bring back from Chicago, the head-
quarters of this military district, may
necessitate changes.
Physical examination of each man
in the corps will take place before
his discharge, to determine whether
he has contracted any physical dis-
ability or disease while in the army.
According tostatements of faculty
and students they are both highly
pleased with the prospect of disband-
ment and the coming return to the
former status.
The prevailing opinion among them
is that college and military training
at the same time are incompatible,
at least under the present arrange-
ment.
The faculty admit that gratitude to
the government for the financial aid,
which the establishment of army
training corps at the universities gave
in the time of a crisis, has prevented
them from making open objection to
the continuance of military training
since the signing of the armistice.
Now, however, they feel'free to state
that the necessary conditions were
almost unbearable. A faculty man
said that the University did not feel
justified in giving credit, for military
work, toward a diploma which sup-
posedly represents a certain academic
accom'plishment.
Although the University may even
now suffer financially from the dis-
continuance of the corps it is more
than willing to have it disbanded.
Baruch Resigns from Industries Board
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 30. - Bernard
Baruch of the war industries board
of the United States, has forwarded
his resignation to President Wilson,
to take effect the first of the year.
His decision to resign has no connec-
tion with reports that he is to be
made the secretary of the treasury.

CHANGES IN S. . T. C.
SCHEDULE ANNOUNCED
LE@S DRILL AND MORE STUDY;
COMPULSORY SUNDAY WORK -
DISCONTINUED
Classes in the University will be-
gin at 8 instead of 7:30 o'clock as
heretofore this year because of con-
tingencies arising from a change in
schedule in the S. A. T. d. routine.
Starting tomorrow the corps will drill
only from 3 until 4:30 o'clock; and
the half hour saved this way, with
an additional fifteen minutes, will be
added to the evening study period,
which will now be held only five eve-
nings a week instead of six.
Drill Hours Cut
A communication from Washing-
ton about 10 days ago, ordered that
the time for military work be reduc-
ed from 11 to 9 hours" per week to
allow more time for academic work.
This necessitated cutting the actual
drill periods to one and a half hours
five days a week, as the rest of the
nine hours is taken up with inspec-
tion and other formations.
At a conference of the military,
naval, and University authorities here
it was decided that the students could
accomplish more in five two and
three-quarter hour study periods
than in six lasting only two hours. It
was agreed to discontinue compulsory
Sunday night study.
Taps Sounded Later
Prof. Lewis M. Gram explained last
night that it was thought best to give
the men some time to themselves aft-
er study so it was decided not to
sound taps until 10:15 o'clock in-
stead of 10 o'clock as is done at pre-
sent. The evening study period
formerly ended at 9 o'clock, but will
now extend until 9:30 o'clock.
"In order to allow the men time
for eight hours and a quarter sleep
under the new arrangement it is nec-
essary to start classes at 8 instead of
7:30 o'clock," Professor Gram stated.
"Although there will be no more
compulsory study on Sunday eve-
nings the Library will be open for
(Continued on Page Six)
Date for German Election Set
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, Nov. 29.-The council of the
people's commissioners has fixed Feb.
16 as the date for the election of rep-
resentatives to the constituent assem-
bly, conditional to the approval of the
soldiers' and workmen's council
which will meet Dec. 15.
The empire is to be divided into 38
divisions which will send from six,
to 16 members to the council, accord-
ing to their population. The num-
bers before the war will be taken as
a basis.

GOETZ
Proving to be one of the wonders
of Coach Yost's war time eleven,
Goetz is responsible for the victory
of the Wolverines over the Ohio State
team, yesterday.
First to get under kicks, first to
intercept passes, and first to block
any attempts of the opposition, to
kick, Goetz usually gets what he goes
after. In the Chicago game he prov-
ed a star. In the Syracuse game he
was better. The M. A. C. contest
proved him a reliable man, and yes-
terday's' contest Troved him one of
Michigan's best grid warriors.
Poets 'acke Thiugh
IVy Songs on Snow
The snow lies soft o'er hill and
dell; the footwear men goloshes sell
and say "Oh, joy." The old tobog-
gans out are brought and mittens,
mufflers, too, are bought for girl and
boy. The happy youngster home
from school in snow the kaiser's
phyz does tool, then throws a brick.
The brick is thrown with righteous
zeal, observed by patriots true and
leal, who make no kick as long as
William's head is broke, so much they
hate the ugly bloke, they shout Huz-
za. If mother dear calls Johnny in
and says that roughness is a sin he
says Pooh. Bah.
WANT NEUTRALS TO
F I X RESPONSIBILITY
(B-y Associated Press)
Berlin (by way of Amsterdam),
Nov. 29.-The German government
has proposed a neutral commission to
be established for the purpose of de-
ciding who will be responsible for
the war.
Besrlin, Nov. 29.-Dr. Alfred Zim-
merman, former secretary of foreign
affairs of the Imperial German gov-
ernment, replying to the charges of
the Bavarian premier, that the gov-
ernment at Berlin was responsible for
the war, declared in the Deutsche
Zeitung of Cologne, "We did in fact
consider that it was a crime and
that it was Austria-Hungary's hour of
destiny. We did not urge Austria-
Hungary to action, but especially ad-
vised them against it. The Vienna
ultimatum was considered entirely
too severe by us, but it was comrmu-
nicated to us too late to mitigate it."

Ohio Field, Columbus, O. Nov. 30.-
Michigan's Varsity football eleve:
closed the season of 1918 this after
noon with a clean slate, when it de
feated the Ohio State team by
score of 14-0.
Going into the battle on a slipper
field, the general opinion of the 7,00
spectators present was to the effet
that the game would be without in
terest, yet it developed into one C
the hardest fought games of the yea
The Scarlet and Gray warriors, prim
ed for the tilt with the Yostmen, man
aged to hold them for three quarter,
Goetz Is Star
Goetz, left tackle for the Maize an
Blue, was the undisputed star of th
contest. After blocking a punt is
the fourth quarter, and falling on I
for a touchdown, the clever gridde
was accredited with having won -th
contest for the Wolverines.
Coach Yost was highly pleased wit
the performance of his men, despit
the fact that the score was not a
large as was expected. Wilce, th
coach of the Ohio team, had promie
ed the visitors a tough contest, an
he 'held to his word.
"Today's game is entirely satisfac
tory," was what Coach Yost had t
say after the contest. "Many of th
players showed more than I though
was in them."
Wilce also was satisfied with th
playing of his men, attributing ther
defeat to the superiority of the Maiz
and Blue eleven.
Buckeyes Ready
With the very start of the contes
it was a fight that looked like neithe
team would score. Holding to thel
old method of preparing for the bi
contests of the year, and letting th
earlier contests pass as they wil
the Scarlet and Gray team was read
for the Yostmen.
From the beginning of the gam
until the fourth quarter, it looked a
though neither team would score. Th
Buckeyes' line held like a ston
wall, stopping the Michigan back
just in time to avoid a score. Proba
bly Vick, the sturdy Michigan cente
was the only man who could plow
big hole through the Ohio line. Fo
tune, at left guard, also did som
good line work, while Goetz, next t
him at the tackle position, was th
feature of the contest.
Steketee Punts 65 Yards
Steketee ran a close kicking ra(
with Rife, the right half of the Ohi
team, yet the Michigan man prove
the better of the two. A 65 yard pu
in the last quarter of the game, tal
ing the ball to the Buckeyes' five yar
line, brought the spectators to the:
feet in amazement, cheering for ti
Grand Rapids freshman.
(Continued on Page Three)
U-Boats in Long Line Off British Po
London, Nov. 30.-There is an avi
nue of U-boats off Harwich nearly
mile long, states a Reuter corre:
pondent. The submarines are towe
to either side in batches of threes an
fours. The correspondent visited
U-boat of the Deutschland type an
saw a blood stained cat o' nine tail
which a British sailor had found m
der the captain's bunk.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
10:30 A. M.-Theme: "The Ideal Religion."
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Evening Service.
Morning service closes in time for Army and Navy men to go to dinner.

11

il -.I

I

j i,-

FOLLOWING
THE
FACULTY CONCERT

ARMY "Y" AND LOCAL CHURCHES PRESENT

HARRY

EMERSON
HILL AUDITORIUM

FOSDICK

SUBJECT:
"MAJOR MOVEMENTS
OF OUR LINES
AS SEEN
IN FRANCE"

THIS AFTERNOON

4:15 P. M.

SUNDAY.

America's Well Known Preacher and Student

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