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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 06, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER
L AND CLOUDY
TODAY

r iai~ir

& UIII*N

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT "IRM
.SERVICE

I

XXIX. No. 5.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1918.

PRICE THREE (

.

JERMANY,

TURKEY

AND

AUSTRIA

P LEAD

FOR

NEW.

PEACE

PARLE

VOLVERINES GRAB
i ITIA CONTEST
fRfOM cAsE ELEVEN

'MEN .S1kLOTHER
BUNCH BY SCORE
88 TO 0

VISITING
OF

SHINING LIGHTS ARE
STEKETEE; D U N N E
Coach Yost Pleased with Actions of
Maize and Blue Gridiron
Smashing through the line for the
majority of their gains, the Wolver-
ines walked all over the Case eleven
yesterday at Ferry field, sending the
visitors home to tell the tale of their
second defeat of the season. Yost's
moleskinners took the long end of the
count with 33 points to their credit and
at the same time, they kept the tech-
nical men from knowing what the
other side of the goal line looked like.
Case Whitewashed
It was a complete whitewash with
Case never nearer making a touch-
down than when they attempted a
kick from near the middle of the field.
They succeeded in reaching Michigan's
15 yard line when the ball was fum-
bled.
A sensational blocked forward pass
brought a wealth of praise to Duke
Dunne, the freshie, who, to finish it
up, grabbed the thing in mid air,
turned around and raced across the
last white line 'on the field. The feat
was not only pronounced good foot-
ball, but it also showed that the fresh-
man had brains, when he turned
around and ran.
Steketee grabbed ,of the honors of
the day when he piled up 21 points
himself. Steketee, another first year
man, hails from Grand Rapids. His
football record together with his show-
ing in the game of yesterday promises
big things. Three of the five touch-
downs were marked up to his credit,
while three kicked goals also went to
himt.
Abe Cohn Plunges
Line plunges featured the work of
Abe Cohn, one of the last year's letter-
men. Whenever called upon, he could
be' counted for a gain.
Case's defense crumbled before the
attack of Michigan's line men, despite
their seven last year men in the line,
while the backs ploughed through the
holes with ease. Vanderhoof, right half
back of the visitors, played their best
game. His toe work brought quite a
bit of comment from the stands while
the ball in his hands proved more
dangerous than when any other Case
man carried it.
Captain McCune of the visitors, at
quarter, used poor judgment when'
twice in the game he used the forward
pass in his own territory. With the
entire geld to gain, and with both of
them being muffed, the plays were
total losses to the team.
The Wolverines did not use the for-
ward pass until the last quarter. At-
tempts, however, even at this stage1
of the game, were failures. Line
plunging is considered the big point
upon which Michigan bases its vic-
tory.
Trick Attempted1
An attempt at a trick play on the
part of Case failed flatly when the vis-
itors attempted to surprise the Maize

INFLUENZA C A S E S
WELL IN HAND NOW
Only a few new cases of influenza,
or the grippe, have been reported to
Dr. J. A. Wessinger, health officer of
Ann Arbor. These together with the
former cases now bring the total to
27 in the entire city. With the closest
attention possible to the common epi-
demic, the city physicians are keep-
ing the number of cases within the
minimum. No fear of the virulent
Spanish influenza over-running Ann
Arbor is held by the majority of phy-
sicians here.
The number of the ordinary influ-
enza cases among the students not in
the students' army training corps are
few in proportion to the enrollment,
according to Dr. W. E. Forsythe of the
University health service. The per-
centage may be looked upon as almost
equal to those of previous years.
The Michigan State Board of Health
has ordered large posters to be put
before the public, which are to inform
the people of the State how to pre-
vent the spread of influenza. "Do not
cough, sneeze, or talk directly into
another's face," it forcefully states.
By such announcements as this, it is
expected that the dissemination of the
malady will be eradicated. The State
of Michigan, like other states, is con-
tinually at work to stamp out the dis-
ease, and the officials together with
the people are doing and should be
doing their utmost to make their work
effective. Every individual is asked
to do his share.
LOAN SUBSCIPTIONS ON
CAPUS FAL 0BEIND0
MICHIGAN MEN HAVE CHANCE
TODAY TO DO THEIR
SHARE
The offices of the Liberty Loan com-
mittee will be open to receive volun-
to 8 p. m., in order that those who.
tary subscriptions today from 9 a. in.
have so far been unable to turn in
their subscriptions may do so during
the voluntary period. The opening of
the offices today is especially for the
benefit of the University faculty, stu-
dents, S. A. T. C. men, army mechan-
ics, and the laboring men whose
working hours have prevented them
from subscribing during the week. The
faculty men are to subscribe at the
downtown office on Main street, those
otherwise connected with the Univer-
sity in Newberry hall. Solicitations
to fill the quota begin tomorrow.
Washtenaw county is still $500,000
behind its quota of $2,800,000, Ann Ar-
bor alone being responsible for $300-
000 of the shortage. The students are
far behind their quota of the third
loan with only $15,000 subscribed,
while the previous campaign netted
$85,000. The committee is hoping for
a large subscription today from both
the University and the city.
INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC DELAYS
THEOLOGICAL LECTURE SERIES

ALLIES FORCE UN TO
OLD KAIMMHILDE -L INE
BELGIAN, FRENCH, AND BRITISH
CAPTURE 10,500 MEN SINCE
SEPT. 28
(By the Associated Press)
BULLETIN
With the British Army in France,
Oct. 6 (5 p. m).-Wide gains of great
importance have been made today by
the fighting British armies. In the
north the line of the Haute Deul canal
has been reached and the Germans are
hurriedly evacuating Lille.
(By the Associated Press)
The American troops in the sector
between Rheims and the Meuse are
engaged in extremely heavy fighting.
Along with the French they are driv-
ing the Germans before them at a
quickening pace. French troops are
reported to have reached Betheniville,
which is several miles beyond the
former line.
Yankees Send Hun to Last Defense
In the north, under the menace of
the British pressure from Flanders
to north of St. Quentin the enemy has
set fire to Douai and other towns and
villages in that area, evidently in
preparation for a retirement to the
French frontier.
With the French covering, the west-
ern outlook of Grand-prey gap through
the Argonne forest, the Americans i
an advance of three miles between the
Meuse and the Aire are rapidly clo-
ing up the eastern entrance to the
path. General Pershing's men in
smashing blows Saturday realized a
considerable advance, all along the
front, and took additional villages and
heights from the Germans. The enemy
resistance was most stubborn as on
this front the Germans are standing
on the Kreimhilde line, the last of
their prepared defenses.-
Americans Advance Toward Sedan
The Americans are advancing to-
ward Sedan and the great communica-
tion line upon which German security
on the present front depends.
On both sides of the Suippe the
American and French troops under
General Gouraud, rapidly are driving
the Germans from the heights dom-
inating the Champagne region east of
Rheims.
From St. Quentin north to the Lys
on the front before the important bas-
es of Cambrai, Douai and Lille, the
British are exerting strong pressure.
The Germans are endeavoring to hold
on to their positions until the work of
devastation in their rear is com-
pleted.
British Make Big Gains
North of St. Quentin the British have
driven further eastward the apex o
their salient of Beaurevorr and on
Saturday capture 10,000 prisoners.
In Belgium the forces under King
Albert maintain their pressure. Since
September 28 the Belgians, French,
and British have advanced nine miles
on a 25 mile front and have taken
10,500 prisoiers and 350 guns.

AUTOS COLLIDE
WASHTENAW

Two atuomobiles collided on the
corner of Hill street and Washtenaw
avenue late yesterday afternoon. A
Ford car going east crashed into a
new Liberty car and both cars were
damaged considerably. Mr. Leslie
Keehill of Detroit was driving the
Ford car and a Mr. Chadwich of the
same city was driving the Liberty. The
occupants of both cars are in the hos-
pital ,although they are believed to
have sustained no serious injuries.
MICHIGAN ALUMNUS
STILL TO APPEAR
With the change of editors the
Michigan Alumnus will continue to be
published this year as formerly. Wil-
fred Shaw, '04, who has been editor
of that publication for the past 14
years, is now assistant educational
director in the S. A. T. C. at Leland
Stanford university.
During his absence Prof. J. R.
Brumm of the Rhetoric. department is
acting editor. Prof. Brumm states
that the war will have little effect on
the publication and circulation of the
magazine. Several hundred subscrip-
tions are from the A. E. F. and from
camps on this side of the Atlantic.
All alumni of the University who are
in this country are urged to send their
copies to their class-mates overseas.
For this purpose a list will be issued
by the Michigan Alumnus with the
names and addresses of former uni-
versity men now in the service. While
this publication is suffering under the
restriction placed by the 'government
on all printed matter, yet there is no
important changes to take place in
this year's editions. The first edition
will be out October 12.
RUMORS THAT M. A. C. CO-EDS
ARE TO BE BARRED IS DENIED
Rumors to :the effect g(hat there
would be no room for women at the
Michigan agricultural college this
year have been discredited by an an-
nouncement from President F. S. Ke -
zie. It was generally reported that
because of the large numbers of the
students' army training corps, that all
housing accommodations would be
needed for their convenience. How-
ever, the courses usually open to
.women will be conducted as before,
and they will be enabled to continue
their education during war time. En-
rollment will continue up to and in-
cluding October 12.
Need Workers at Angell House Now
University women are urged to
spend spare moments in working on
the surgical dressings for the Red
Cross at the Angell house. The work
goes on every day except Saturday.
Hours are from 9 to 5 o'clock. No
arrangement has been made yet for
definite periods to be devoted to the
work. In the meantime girls are bad-
ly needed there.

f'

IC

ON
AVE.

CENTRAL P.OWERS FORM NEW PEACE
NOTE FOR ENTENTE ALLIES ACCEPTING
PRESIDENT WILSON'S 14 CONDITION

BUY BONDS TODAY!

it

Liberty Loan headquarters o!i
Main street and the students' of-
fice at Newberry hall will be kep t
open today to give everyone an
extra day to volunteer for bonds.
The campaign managers realized
that the past week was a busy
one for the faculty and students
especially, so this extra oppor-
tunity is given them to purchase
their bonds. Automobiles will be
allowed to run to take volunteers
to the offices. This will be the
last day for voluntary buying.

1

-1

I i

"Hat Frosh" Goes
Into Short Exile
"Hat, Frosh!"
Another relic has been added to the
already long list of "Befo' the Wah"
customs that used to prevail around
our institution in the days when Sun-
day flivvering was a virtue and sugar
was sold by the pound instead of by
the carat.
For the first time in years, the ush-
ering in of Michigan's football sea-
son was unaccomplished by the fam-
iliar cry which used to bare so many
yearling heads to the fall breezes.
Yesterday afternoon the freshmen
were unmarked by the pot, which,
from time immorial, has aroused the
ire of upperclassmen when worn in
front of the Ferry field bleachers.
The first year men walked proudly
along the runway yesterday, clad in
all kinds of civilized headgear, and
the "frosh pot" was, as a Michigan
institution, officially laid away in the
dusty closet where our time-honored
traditions are being preserved toward
a newer and happier day.
METHOD OF SHIPPING PARCELS
OVER THERE AT XMAS DECIDED
The Red Cross wishes to make
known the following statements in re-
gard to Christmas parcels. The war
department wishes each man to re-
ceive only one parcel of standard size
and weight. To carry out this plan,
army authorities are distributing
Christmas parcel labels to men abroad
who will mail them to relatives and
friends.
No parcel. will be accepted for mail-
ing by the postoffice without label re-
ceived from abroad. Cartons will be
received at county headquarters in
ample time. The cartons will not
be delivered unless label is presented
As soon as cartons are received it
will be announced through the daily
papers.
The Red Cross is at present using
Angell house for surgical dressing
but are unable to state how long this
will be retained.
Medic Rumor Denied by Commandant]
At 1 o'clock this morning Captain
Durkee denied any knowledge of the
rumor that is being circulated about
the campus to the effect that medical
students will be inducted into the ser-

NEW GERMAN CHANCELLOR ASKS
FOR IMMEDIATE END OF
WAR
AUSTRIA WILLING TO
GIVE BACK BELGIUM
Propose Making Alsace-Loraine an
Autonomy; Want Back German
Colony
BULLETIN
(By the Associated Press)
Amsterdam, Oct 6.-The immediate
suspension of hostilities has been pro.
posed by the imperial German ean-
cellor, Prince MaximIlian, in the
reichstag, according to a Berlin cor
respondent of the TIjd. The Allies are
to be asked to state their terms.
Amsterdam (By Reuter's), Oct. 6.-
The new peace note by Baron Bur-
ran, Austro-Hungarian foreign minis-
ter, will declare that all of President
Wilson's terms have been accepted,
according to a Vienna dispatch to the
Frankfort Zeitung, which is quoted in
the Dutch press. The note will be
published immediately.
(By the Associated Press)
Paris, Oct. 6.-The Austro-Hunga-
rian minister at Stockholm has been
charged to- request the Swedish gov-
ernment to transmit to President Wil-
son a proposal to conclude immedi-
ately with him and his Allies a gen-
eral armistice and to start without
delay negotiations for peace.
Austria Desires Peace
This announcement is made through
a Berne dispatch through the Havre
agency. The text of the proposal fol-
lows:
"The Austro-Hungarian monarchy,
which has made only defensive war-
fare, and has borne witness several
times to its desire to put an end to
the blood shed ,and conclude an hon-
orable peace, proposes by presentation
to President Wilson to conclude im-
mediately with him and his Allies a
general armistice on land, on sea, and
in the air, and start without delay
negotiations for peace.
"These negotiations will be based
on the 14 points in President Wilson's
message of July 8, and the four points
in his speech of Feb. 12 (Feb. 11),
1918,,and those equally of Sept. 22,
1918."
To Form League of Arbitration
The chancellor's proposals embrac-
ed also the dispatch of plenipotentar-
les $o a neutral point to discuss the
creation of a federal Austria, the
right of self determination for Rus-
sian frontier states, the restoration
and indemnification of Belgium, au-
tonomy for Alsace-Lorraine, and the
return of the German colonies.
The terms of the Allies will be
asked at the same time with the ob-
ject of forming a basis for the cn-
sideration of these important ques-
tions.
(By the Associated Press)
Stockholm, Oct. 6:-Prince Maximil-
lian of Baden, the new imperial Ger-
man chancellor, is willing to accept
President Wilson's 14 peace condi-
tions, according to reports received
from Berlin by circles closely cou-

The lecture engagement of Dr. Wal-
ter A. Jessup of Iowa University has
been cancelled because of the epidemic
of Spanish influenza that is sweeping
his school. Dr. Jessup was to have
opened a series of theological lec-
tures at the Methodist church this
evening, under the auspices of the
Wesleyan Guild. The S. A. T. C. at
Iowa is under quarantine with 250

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION

10:30-LEONARD A. BARRETT speaks
"THE SURRENDER OF BULGARIA"

STUDENTS INVITED

kuontLLnueaonrge neL ass rin Jz te taent LIooa I IIkcIZd IIL~t LU~I I. I _______________________________________ Ivice tomorrow morning. (Contnued on Pag
U U

;e six)

CHRISTIAN

FR

K

BELL,

C S.

SCIENCE
LECTURE

WHITNEY THEATRE
SUNDAY, OCT. 6
3 P. M.

PHILADELPHIA, PA.
MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF LECTURESHIP OF THE FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST IN BOSTON MASS.

i

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